Church Services resumed at the beginning of September. For more information click here.

Important Notice – 3rd November 2020.

Please note all services have been suspended until further notice and are unlikley to resume until Sunday 6th December.

Whether or not you are able to attend these services the ‘Online Service’ will continue to be published on this page.


LAST SUNDAY BEFORE ADVENT
22nd November 2020 – from The Rev’d David Hider

THANK YOU for joining our act of worship on this last Sunday of the Church’s year.

Let us bring to mind our continuing failures to love God, his people and his Creation:
                                            
Our Lord Jesus Christ said:
The first commandment is this:
‘Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God is the only Lord.
You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart,
with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength.’
The second is this: ‘Love your neighbour as yourself.’
There is no other commandment greater than these.
On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.  Amen.

[Pause]

Come, let us return to the Lord and say:
Lord our God, in our sin we have avoided your call.
Our love for you is like a morning cloud, like the dew that goes away early.
Have mercy on us; deliver us from judgement;
bind up our wounds and revive us; in Jesus Christ our Lord.

May almighty God have mercy on us,
forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

To which we respond, by saying:

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Glory to God in the highest.

Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Glory to God in the highest.

Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
Glory to God in the highest.

For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father.
Glory to God in the highest. Amen.

We pray the Collect for today

Eternal Father,
whose Son Jesus Christ ascended to the throne of heaven
that he might rule over all things as Lord and King:
keep the Church in the unity of the Spirit
and in the bond of peace,
and bring the whole created order to worship at his feet;
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the Letter of Paul to the Ephesians, chapter 1, verses 15 to 23

I have heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus and your love toward all the saints, and for this reason I do not cease to give thanks for you as I remember you in my prayers. I pray that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give you a spirit of wisdom and revelation as you come to know him, so that, with the eyes of your heart enlightened, you may know what is the hope to which he has called you, what are the riches of his glorious inheritance among the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of his power for us who believe, according to the working of his great power. God put this power to work in Christ when he raised him from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly places, far above all rule and authority and power and dominion, and above every name that is named, not only in this age but also in the age to come. And he has put all things under his feet and has made him the head over all things for the church, which is his body, the fullness of him who fills all in all.

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 25, verses 31 to 46

Jesus said to the disciples: “When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, then he will sit on the throne of his glory. All the nations will be gathered before him, and he will separate people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats, and he will put the sheep at his right hand and the goats at the left. Then the king will say to those at his right hand, ‘Come, you that are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you gave me clothing, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me.’ Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry and gave you food, or thirsty and gave you something to drink? And when was it that we saw you a stranger and welcomed you, or naked and gave you clothing? And when was it that we saw you sick or in prison and visited you?’ And the king will answer them, ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me.’ Then he will say to those at his left hand, ‘You that are accursed, depart from me into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels; for I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not give me clothing, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.’ Then they also will answer, ‘Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not take care of you?’ Then he will answer them, ‘Truly I tell you, just as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to me.’ And these will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.”

We reflect upon today’s Message

‘Stir up, O Lord, the wills of your faithful people…’ So begins the Post-Communion Collect set for today (the words are shown later). ‘Stir up, Sunday’, as some call the day, referring to the tradition of preparing Christmas puddings on this day. But, the actual words are: ‘Stir up the wills …’. Let’s do just that by shouting out loud – so loud to alert our elected politicians to the message that Christianity matters and worship in our Churches is not a just social gathering, but essential to the life and well-being of those who would regularly gather there (in other words, not just on Christmas Day!). So, let us shout the Creedal exclamation:   
Christ has died!
Christ is Risen!
Christ will come again!
‘Shout it’ could also take the form of an electronic communication** directly to Downing Street or to the local MP. Today, as we celebrate the festival of ‘Christ the King’, provides a good opportunity to make Christian voices heard.

We all know about elections as, living in a democratic country like ours, these are used to make decisions to choose people to serve our country and local communities. Our Gospel reading provides, yet another, “make-your-mind-up-time” – only, this time, we are not asked to choose between candidates as in election terms, but we are asked to declare our position in regards to Jesus who came as a servant to his people. So, the matter is more of a referendum than an election (and we all know about referendums, don’t we?). The question which we consider is, quite simply: “Are we for Jesus, or not?” Or, as our Gospel text puts it: “Are we to be placed with the sheep, or with the goats?” What follows is a bit technical (but, hopefully, not tedious!), as I try to provide a convincing argument to vote ‘for’ Jesus (which also might help others make up their minds!).

What does Jesus offer us? Let us look at a small part of his ‘manifesto’.
Why do we need Jesus?  It is Jesus who has brought us back into a relationship with God, our Creator:
– to bring meaning and purpose to our lives, as was intended. Jesus said “I am the bread of life” (John 6:35), showing that only he can satisfy our needs.
– to give us life beyond death. Jesus said “I am the resurrection and the life”     (John 11:25-26) and “I am the way, the truth and the life” (John 14:6) to remind us that only in him do we find eternal life.
– to provide for forgiveness, our deepest need (Mark 2:5). This was the whole purpose of the Cross.
Why should we bother with Jesus? Simply, because Christianity is true and of vital importance to every human being.
    – Christianity is based upon historical evidence. There is more concrete     evidence to support the Christian faith than any other historical event.
– Jesus is the Son of God, on an equal footing with God. Jesus said: “Welcome me – welcome God” (Mark 9:37) and “Receive me – receive God” (Matthew 10:40) to show that he was more than just a man or just a great religious teacher. He also said: “To have seen me is to have seen God” (John 14:9)
    – Jesus is the supreme example of a selfless life. No-one, before or since, has     ever shown such love and compassion to his fellow-beings.
    – Jesus’ teaching is the best ever to have been given. As an example, no-one,     since, has bettered the teaching of the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7).
    – The resurrection story is true as is seen by the transformation of the lives of     the disciples to such an extent that the Christian faith survives today on the     strength of their witness.
Why did Jesus come? To give his life to pay the price for our sins (Mark 10:45).  This was not just a physical death with its emotional pain – this was the spiritual anguish of being separated from God as he carried all our sins. Jesus died for – rather, instead of – us. He did this because he loved us and did not want us to pay the penalty for all the things that we had done wrong. He did it for you – he did it for me. He would have done it if you, or I, had been the only person in the world. The blood of Jesus was the ransom price to set us free.
– Free from the guilt, addiction and fear of our sins which cut us off from God eternally.
– Freed to know God, to love, to change through the presence of his Holy Spirit in our lives.

So, now we know the ‘manifesto’, what will we do? As with any election or referendum, our choices are limited to three options.

1) We can vote against! Our Christmas story tells how King Herod wanted the baby Jesus killed. Why? Because Herod saw Jesus as a threat to his reign. Or, we can join with the crowd of our Easter story and shout ‘Crucify him!’? And, so, the sort of people who would vote against are:
    – those who do not really believe,
    – those who feel that they do not need / want Jesus in their lives,
– those who just find that the whole subject requires too much hard thought and sacrifice.  
But, of course, if we choose to vote against Jesus, we must be prepared accept the consequences. In this case, we get placed with the opposition party – the goats! (Matthew 25:41).

2) We can do nothing! There are people who do not even bother to vote at elections. They make no effort to get involved. They see elections as a waste of their time – something which gets in the way of the busyness of their lives. The townsfolk of Bethlehem at that first Christmas were so wrapped up in their own concerns that they missed what God was doing when Jesus was born. At that first Easter, Pontius Pilate tried to wash his hands of making a decision about Jesus – yet, history says ‘Crucified under Pontius Pilate.’ You see, abstaining lets in the opposition – it is, in effect, a ‘No’ vote.  

And, likewise, so is hedging your bets, or trying to vote both ways. The Christmas story tells us that the inn-keeper let Mary, Joseph and the nearly-born Jesus in – but only to the cowshed. He did not commit himself truly to the needs of their situation. At Easter, we hear how Simon Peter tried to sit in both camps – one moment he was declaring his support to Jesus and, then, when challenged by others, he denies his connection. The fooling-around, laughing and dice-throwing soldiers (Matthew 27:39-44) sent Jesus to the Cross without compassion for the victim of their actions. Today, we are tempted to trivialise Christmas without thought for its significance for our lives. Opting out of our responsibilities lets in the opposition, too – it is, in effect, another ‘No’ vote. But, whatever we decide, whatever we do, we must remember that this “election” is on – the time to make our own decision is running out.

3) We can vote for – that is, give a ‘Yes’ vote! Then, we would be like Joseph who accepted Mary and her Son, despite the potential for scandal. Or, the Wise Men who travelled from afar just to honour the new King. These men voted “Yes” for Jesus. Or, we would be like the thief on the cross, who recognised his fellow-sufferer for who he truly was (Luke 23:42). Or, Joseph of Arimathea who, bravely, went to the Roman authorities to ask for Jesus’ body to bury (Luke 23:52). Whatever others said, the thief and Joseph were for Jesus, too. Are we? Who among us will give an unequivocal ‘Yes’ today?

So, there we have it. A ‘manifesto’ for Jesus, together with the options – and consequences – to vote as we see the matter. Sheep or goat? We all have a ‘voting slip’ – we should use it! And, as with all elections, the response is entirely and individually ours. Our answer, of course, being between us and God. Join me and vote ‘YES’ for Christ the King. If not, in the words of the great Irish comic, Dave Allen, ‘may YOUR god go with you’!

** Email addresses (which you might need to copy & paste into your browser):
No.10:    https://email.number10.gov.uk
Local MP:    gillian.keegan.mp@parliament.uk

A Christian Creed

Christ has died!
Christ is Risen!
Christ will come again!

Let us affirm our faith in Jesus Christ the Son of God.

Though he was divine,
he did not cling to equality with God,
but made himself nothing.
Taking the form of a slave,
he was born in human likeness.
He humbled himself
and was obedient to death,
even the death of the cross.
Therefore God has raised him on high,
and given him the name above every name:
that at the name of Jesus
every knee should bow,
and every voice proclaim that Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father. Amen.

A suggestion for your Prayers

Please also continue to pray for Moira and her family.

In peace, let us pray to Jesus our Lord, who ever lives to make intercession for us.

Saviour of the world,
be present in all places of suffering, violence and pain,
and bring hope even in the darkest night.
Inspire us to continue your work of reconciliation today.

Lord of the Church,
empower by your Spirit all Christian people,
especially Bishops Martin, Ruth and William, Moira and Readers, John and Jenny,
and the work of your Church in every land.
Give us grace to proclaim the gospel joyfully in word and deed

Shepherd and Guardian of our souls,
guide and enable all who lead and serve this country and our local community
and those on whom we depend for our daily needs.
Grant that we may seek the peace and welfare of this place.

Great Physician,
stretch out your hand to bring comfort, wholeness and peace
to all who suffer in body, mind, or spirit,
especially those suffering from Covid-19 or its consequences through lockdown.
Fill us with compassion, that we may be channels of your healing love.

Conqueror of death,
remember for good those whom we love but see no longer.
Help us to live this day in the sure and certain hope of your eternal victory.

Let us commend ourselves, and all for whom we pray,
to the mercy and protection of God.

So, we pray in the words that Jesus taught his first disciples:

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Stir up, O Lord,
the wills of your faithful people;
that they, plenteously bringing forth the fruit of good works,
may by you be plenteously rewarded;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Lord Jesus, foundation stone,
Lord and Saviour:
bless those who are foundation stones,
bearing the weight Of responsibility
and other people’s trust and vulnerability.
Bless those who are stones below our eye line,
those who do the little jobs, the unfashionable jobs,
but who keep the wall secure.
Bless those who are the capstones
sitting on the top for all to see,
the gifted ones, the ones that get the attention.
Bless the misshapen stones
that fit in between the others,
plugging the gaps, the ones that can get looked down on.
And bless those who pass by this spiritual house we are being built into,
as yet unaware of your love for them. Amen.

God the Father,
help us to hear the call of Christ the King
and to follow in his service,
whose kingdom has no end;
for he reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, one glory;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

And, finally!!!

In case you missed it last week! A Call to Prayer

The Archbishops have written to all the clergy in the Church of England stating that their conviction that the first and primary response of the Church at this time was prayer.

“Bearing in mind our primary vocation as the Church of Jesus Christ to pray and to serve we call upon the Church of England to make this month of lockdown a month of prayer. More than anything else, whatever the nation thinks, we know that we are in the faithful hands of the risen Christ who knows our weaknesses, tiredness and struggles and whose steadfast love endures for ever.
Above all we recall people to some of the fundamental spiritual disciplines that shape our Christian life. How we do this is up to each congregation and clergy person. We will publish resources to support you before the first day of lockdown. During the first lockdown we cheered for the NHS every Thursday. During this second lockdown we invite you to fast in a way appropriate to you as well as pray for our nation every Thursday, for its leaders, its health and essential services and all those who suffer.”

The Archbishops, in consultation with the House of Bishops, decided that this call would take the form of an invitation to every Christian and person of goodwill to pray at 6pm every day for the period of this present lock-down. This call is going far and wide – and the hope is that many of our ecumenical partners will join us.

The Archbishops promised some resources in the form of different styles of written prayers with a particular thematic focus for prayer each day. The weblink to the resources is here.  In addition, there is a link there to a simple printable prayer booklet – ‘Prayer Booklet’. This material is intended simply as one tool to enable participation – the hope is that individuals and worshipping communities make these times of prayer their own. There is no desire by the Archbishops to be directive in this – rather simply to encourage all to be united in Prayer for the Nation.

Church of England Advent campaign
The Church of England 2020 advent campaign, Comfort and Joy,  holds together the hope that Christmas will bring joy and celebration after a uniquely difficult year. Read more about this resource here.

Christmas will still happen …
Jennie Christie has supplies of Church Christmas cards (£4.00 for 10) and pens (£2.00 each) to sell. Contact: 01243 532642 or jennifer_christie_uk@hotmail.com

 

SECOND SUNDAY BEFORE ADVENT – 15th November 2020

THANK YOU for joining our regular weekly on-line act of worship.

Let us bring to mind our continuing failures to love God, his people and his Creation:
                                            [Pause]

Most merciful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
we confess that we have sinned in thought, word and deed.
We have not loved you with our whole heart.
We have not loved our neighbours as ourselves.
In your mercy forgive what we have been,
help us to amend what we are, and direct what we shall be;
that we may do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with you, our God. Amen.

May almighty God have mercy on us,
forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

To which we respond, by saying:

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

We pray the Collect for Today

Heavenly Father,
whose blessed Son was revealed
to destroy the works of the devil
and to make us the children of God and heirs of eternal life:
grant that we, having this hope,
may purify ourselves even as he is pure;
that when he shall appear in power and great glory
we may be made like him in his eternal and glorious kingdom;
where he is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the First Letter to the Thessalonians, chapter 5, verses 1 to 11

Concerning the times and the seasons, brothers and sisters, you do not need to have anything written to you. For you yourselves know very well that the day of the Lord will come like a thief in the night. When they say, “There is peace and security,” then sudden destruction will come upon them, as labour pains come upon a pregnant woman, and there will be no escape! But you, beloved, are not in darkness, for that day to surprise you like a thief; for you are all children of light and children of the day; we are not of the night or of darkness. So then let us not fall asleep as others do, but let us keep awake and be sober; for those who sleep sleep at night, and those who are drunk get drunk at night. But since we belong to the day, let us be sober, and put on the breastplate of faith and love, and for a helmet the hope of salvation. For God has destined us not for wrath but for obtaining salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ, who died for us, so that whether we are awake or asleep we may live with him. Therefore encourage one another and build up each other, as indeed you are doing.

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 25, verses 14 to 30

Jesus said to his disciples: “The Kingdom of heaven is as if a man, going on a journey, summoned his slaves and entrusted his property to them; to one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one, to each according to his ability. Then he went away. The one who had received the five talents went off at once and traded with them, and made five more talents. In the same way, the one who had the two talents made two more talents. But the one who had received the one talent went off and dug a hole in the ground and hid his master’s money. After a long time the master of those slaves came and settled accounts with them. Then the one who had received the five talents came forward, bringing five more talents, saying, ‘Master, you handed over to me five talents; see, I have made five more talents.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.’ And the one with the two talents also came forward, saying, ‘Master, you handed over to me two talents; see, I have made two more talents.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.’ Then the one who had received the one talent also came forward, saying, ‘Master, I knew that you were a harsh man, reaping where you did not sow, and gathering where you did not scatter seed; so I was afraid, and I went and hid your talent in the ground. Here you have what is yours.’ But his master replied, ‘You wicked and lazy slave! You knew, did you, that I reap where I did not sow, and gather where I did not scatter? Then you ought to have invested my money with the bankers, and on my return I would have received what was my own with interest. So take the talent from him, and give it to the one with the ten talents. For to all those who have, more will be given, and they will have an abundance; but from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away. As for this worthless slave, throw him into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’

We reflect upon today’s Message from Jenny Blamire

When I first started to read my Bible regularly I used to ask myself a series of questions about the passage. As I read the two readings for today one of the questions came to mind immediately. Is there a warning to heed or a promise to claim? These readings have both and have much to teach us about living our lives well in the knowledge that one day Jesus will return! How does God want us to live out our lives so that one day he might say to us, “Well done, good and trustworthy servant?

Jesus tells the parable of the talents when he was teaching about what the Bible calls the last days. It follows the parable about wise and foolish virgins, which we heard last week, about being ready for Jesus’ return or for the end of our lives.
What exactly was a talent worth? If you were a labourer in New Testament times and if you worked every day for 15 years, you might nearly have earned one talent. So when the landowner went on his journey, what he was entrusting to his servants was massive. It was a huge responsibility which all three servants must have felt, but their reactions to the task were different. The first two took their master’s task seriously. The third ignored the master, a case of out of sight, out of mind.
The servants had been told that one day the master would return and they would have to give an account of the money and tell the master what exactly they’d done with it. Jesus was telling his hearers, and us in our turn, that one day we will all be answerable to God as to how we’ve lived our lives. The servants were entrusted with the master’s property. How do we view what we’ve been given? How have we used our money, our possessions, our homes, time and our God given talents, in fact all that we have and all that we are? Do we view them as ours alone or are our lives entrusted to us by God? It’s something we need to think about and is part of how we prepare for our day of judgement. That’s quite a sobering thought!

Jesus told this story to make us aware that how we use our lives, our gifts, talents and abilities do matter because God loves us and wants us “to enter into his joy”. The reading from Thessalonians has a similar theme and it gives us some clues about how we are to live now. Live as children of the light, and there is that same warning to be ready for Jesus. We are to “put on the breastplate of faith and love, and for a helmet the hope of salvation”.

What does this mean in practice? In his nineties, Billy Graham wrote a book called “Nearing Home” about “Life, Faith and Finishing well”. His secret to being ready for that time when he passed away was to build his life on Jesus Christ, a sure foundation. He made a commitment to follow Jesus when he was young man and urges us to do the same. It’s never too late. That commitment is the beginning of our journey as a Christian.

St Paul encouraged the Thessalonian church to encourage one another and build each other up. The Thessalonians were living through a time of persecution and that encouragement really helped them to keep going. We are living through a second lockdown, different circumstances but we still need encouragement. I know I have really valued those phone calls I’ve received from friends and family who are just catching up and sharing their lives with me.

The gifts and talents we have been given are very varied but maybe we can use them to help us through this difficult time. With the time not spent on travelling to work each day one member of our family has enjoyed a return to painting, (on canvas not walls!) while another friend has started playing the piano again. It’s good to take care of our own wellbeing and then we’ll be able to look outwards and help and encourage each other.

In the sixteenth century St Teresa of Avila wrote a poem about doing this, called “Christ has no body”. It contains these words.  
“Christ has no body now but yours.
No hands, no feet on earth but yours.
Yours are the eyes through which he looks Compassion on this world.
Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good.
Yours are the hands with which he blesses all the world.”

We can serve our world and use what we have to bless others.
The warning to use our talents well is clear. What of God’s promises in these readings? Both readings assure us that what God wants for us both in this life and the next is for us to live with him. May we hear Jesus’ words and choose life.

A Christian Creed
Let us affirm our faith in Jesus Christ the Son of God.

Though he was divine,
he did not cling to equality with God,
but made himself nothing.
Taking the form of a slave,
he was born in human likeness.
He humbled himself
and was obedient to death,
even the death of the cross.
Therefore God has raised him on high,
and given him the name above every name:
that at the name of Jesus
every knee should bow,
and every voice proclaim that Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father. Amen.

A suggestion for your Prayers

Please continue to pray for Moira and her family, especially during this coming week which includes her mother’s funeral. Please pray for any known to you who are unwell or feeling the strains of the restrictions on life. And, please include the families of Mary Argiroy Westcombe and Norman Edward Gubbey as they prepare for respective Interment of Ashes and Funeral Services at Fishbourne Church.

We pray for strength to follow Jesus.

Jesus said: ‘Whoever wishes to be great among you must be your servant.’
Saviour, we hear your call. Help us to follow.

Jesus said: ‘Unless you change and become humble like little children,
you can never enter the Kingdom of heaven.’
Saviour, we hear your call. Help us to follow.

Jesus said: ‘Happy are the humble; they will receive what God has promised.’
Saviour, we hear your call. Help us to follow.

Jesus said: ‘Be merciful as your Father is merciful;
love your enemies and do good to them.’
Saviour, we hear your call. Help us to follow.

Jesus said: ‘Love one another, as I love you;
there is no greater love than this, to lay down your life for your friends.’
Saviour, we hear your call. Help us to follow.

Jesus said: ‘Go to people everywhere and make them my disciples,
and I will be with you always, to the end of time.’
Saviour, we hear your call. Help us to follow.

God of mercy,
you know us and love us and hear our prayer:
keep us in the eternal fellowship of Jesus Christ our Saviour.  Amen.

We pray in the words that Jesus taught his first disciples:

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Gracious Lord,
in this holy sacrament
you give substance to our hope:
bring us at the last
to that fullness of life for which we long;
through Jesus Christ our Saviour. Amen.

Heavenly Lord,
you long for the world’s salvation:
stir us from apathy,
restrain us from excess
and revive in us new hope
that all creation will one day be healed
in Jesus Christ our Lord;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

And, finally!!!

In case you missed it! A Call to Prayer

The Archbishops have written to all the clergy in the Church of England stating that their conviction that the first and primary response of the Church at this time was prayer.
“Bearing in mind our primary vocation as the Church of Jesus Christ to pray and to serve we call upon the Church of England to make this month of lockdown a month of prayer. More than anything else, whatever the nation thinks, we know that we are in the faithful hands of the risen Christ who knows our weaknesses, tiredness and struggles and whose steadfast love endures for ever.

Above all we recall people to some of the fundamental spiritual disciplines that shape our Christian life. How we do this is up to each congregation and clergy person. We will publish resources to support you before the first day of lockdown. During the first lockdown we cheered for the NHS every Thursday. During this second lockdown we invite you to fast in a way appropriate to you as well as pray for our nation every Thursday, for its leaders, its health and essential services and all those who suffer.”

The Archbishops, in consultation with the House of Bishops, decided that this call would take the form of an invitation to every Christian and person of goodwill to pray at 6pm every day for the period of this present lock-down. This call is going far and wide – and the hope is that many of our ecumenical partners will join us.

The Archbishops promised some resources in the form of different styles of written prayers with a particular thematic focus for prayer each day. The weblink to the resources is here.

In addition, there is a link there to a simple printable prayer booklet – ‘Prayer Booklet’. This material is intended simply as one tool to enable participation – the hope is that individuals and worshipping communities make these times of prayer their own. There is no desire by the Archbishops to be directive in this – rather simply to encourage all to be united in Prayer for the Nation.

Other Notices
Christmas will still happen …
Jennie Christie has supplies of Church Christmas cards (£4.00 for 10) and pens (£2.00 each) to sell. Contact: 01243 532642 or jennifer_christie_uk@hotmail.com

A notice from Jenny Blamire about Jenny Green’s retirement

CMS has sent the following, now slightly abridged, email to (our) Jenny which covers all that is needed to know:

“CMS are hosting a virtual Event of Thanksgiving for your church’s link Mission Partner Jenny Green on Thursday 3rd December from 6:30pm to 7:30pm and we’d love for you and your congregation to join us. Our aim is to gather together all of Jenny’s supporting churches and individuals to say a big thank you to her and pray for her together as she ends her service with CMS after so many years.

It will be run on Zoom, I imagine that a lot of your congregation are becoming increasingly comfortable using virtual platforms now. I’m hoping that the date and time won’t clash with any other church event you already have planned.

I’d be incredibly grateful if you could help me by advertising the event to your congregation and all those who have supported Jenny in her work over the years. You just need to get the Eventbrite link (below) out there. Use your email list, Facebook page, newsletter or however you communicate with your congregation at the moment. Once they sign up they will be given instructions on how to join the event.

The Eventbrite link for this event is here.

It will be a mixture of talks, questions and prayer, including a prayer from the Bishop of Bradford, so it should hopefully be an enjoyable experience for everyone.”

Of course, you’ll need to supply your own celebratory drink and cake!

To date, Allan and Jenny Blamire have signed up to attend.
 

An Act of Remembrance – 8th November 2020

The Lord is my shepherd;
 therefore can I lack nothing.

 He makes me lie down in green pastures
 and leads me beside still waters.
 He shall refresh my soul
 and guide me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.
 Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
 I will fear no evil;
 for you are with me;
 your rod and your staff, they comfort me.
 You spread a table before me
 in the presence of those who trouble me;
 you have anointed my head with oil
 and my cup shall be full.
 Surely goodness and loving mercy shall follow me
 all the days of my life,
 and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever.

They shall grow not old,
as we that are left grow old;
age shall not weary them,
nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun
and in the morning,
we will remember them.

Two minutes’ silence may be observed.
 
When you go home tell them of us and say,
for your tomorrow we gave our today.

O God of truth and justice,
we hold before you those people
who have died in active service.
As we honour their courage and cherish their memory,
may we put our faith in your future;
for you are the source of life, peace and hope,
now and for ever. Amen.

THANK YOU for joining our (slightly longer) weekly on-line act of worship.

Let us bring to mind our continuing failures to love God, his people and his Creation:
                                            [Pause]
Most merciful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
we confess that we have sinned in thought, word and deed.
We have not loved you with our whole heart.
We have not loved our neighbours as ourselves.
In your mercy
forgive what we have been,
help us to amend what we are,
and direct what we shall be;
that we may do justly, love mercy,
and walk humbly with you, our God. Amen.

May almighty God have mercy on us,
forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

To which we respond, by saying:
Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

We pray the Collect for Today

Almighty Father,
whose will is to restore all things in your beloved Son, the King of all:
govern the hearts and minds of those in authority,
and bring the families of the nations,
divided and torn apart by the ravages of sin,
to be subject to his just and gentle rule;
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the First Letter to the Thessalonians, chapter 4, verses 13 to 18

We do not want you to be uninformed, brothers and sisters, about those who have died, so that you may not grieve as others do who have no hope. For since we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so, through Jesus, God will bring with him those who have died. For this we declare to you by the word of the Lord, that we who are alive, who are left until the coming of the Lord, will by no means precede those who have died. For the Lord himself, with a cry of command, with the archangel’s call and with the sound of God’s trumpet, will descend from heaven, and the dead in Christ will rise first. Then we who are alive, who are left, will be caught up in the clouds together with them to meet the Lord in the air; and so we will be with the Lord forever. Therefore encourage one another with these words.

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 25, verses 1 to 13

Jesus spoke this parable to the disciples. “Then the kingdom of heaven will be like this. Ten bridesmaids took their lamps and went to meet the bridegroom. Five of them were foolish, and five were wise. When the foolish took their lamps, they took no oil with them; but the wise took flasks of oil with their lamps. As the bridegroom was delayed, all of them became drowsy and slept. But at midnight there was a shout, ‘Look! Here is the bridegroom! Come out to meet him.’ Then all those bridesmaids got up and trimmed their lamps. The foolish said to the wise, ‘Give us some of your oil, for our lamps are going out.’ But the wise replied, ‘No! there will not be enough for you and for us; you had better go to the dealers and buy some for yourselves.’ And while they went to buy it, the bridegroom came, and those who were ready went with him into the wedding banquet; and the door was shut. Later the other bridesmaids came also, saying, ‘Lord, lord, open to us.’ But he replied, ‘Truly I tell you, I do not know you.’ Keep awake therefore, for you know neither the day nor the hour.”

We reflect upon today’s Message

Being a (just!) post-war baby, one of the main forms of entertainment, when I was younger, was listening to the radio – The Archers, The Billy Cotton Bandshow, The Goon Show, Peter Brough and Archie Andrews, Hancock’s Half-Hour, The “Big” Bands, and the like. One of the comedians of my youth was Al Reid, who used to work into his comic routines the phrase: “enough was said at our Edie’s wedding”. It is a phrase that still occurs in today’s spoken language – particularly, among an older generation trying to protect family members or friends from embarrassing incidents. Well, it was an embarrassing incident at a village wedding that sparked Jesus on the occasion covered by this morning’s Gospel account.

For a moment, imagine the setting: a Jewish village (or small town), Jesus sitting surrounded by the usual group of disciples and by curious local folk who were pleased to hear all he said – and by a few serious men who were the experts in the Jewish law and religion, probably disagreeing with each other except on one subject which was that they were united in opposition to this new teacher.

Whether Jesus and the crowd around him observed the incident of the wedding happening in that village, or whether the incident had happened earlier or elsewhere and was common gossip, we will never know. However, the usual wedding procedure was for the bridegroom to visit his future father-in-law to agree the marriage contract. When this business was successfully completed, the bridegroom, now accompanied by his bride, would return to his own home for the wedding feast. The bridesmaids were expected to greet the couple as they came near to the house.

In the case of the incident recorded here, the negotiations obviously took longer than was expected. Night fell and, only after dark, did the couple return. Of course, all the bridesmaids were asleep. Embarrassingly, when they were woken up by the cries that the bridegroom was on his way, only some of them had oil in their lamps.

The point of Jesus’ story was very simple. He looked at the mixed crowd of people listening to him as he taught. Some heard his words eagerly and welcomed the new insights and freedom he brought – while others argued and disputed, rejecting his words and him. No doubt Jesus made the most of it, jokily comparing the long faced serious religious men with the ill-prepared, dizzy young bridesmaids. It is no wonder that ordinary people were glad to listen to him.

The parable teaches that none of us know the time when we must give account of ourselves, the time when we come face-to-face with Jesus. In one sense, it is every moment – in another, at death. We know neither the day, nor the hour. And, let us all be quite sure, with the end of a life comes the judgement of that person.

In these strange times, feedback on such articles such as our Sunday website messages are quite thin and, so, it is difficult to assess the health of Christianity and its spread amongst the community. This is understandable as we see each other rarely – and will do so even more over the next few weeks! However, the creators of these Sunday messages all hope and pray that readers try to remember both what is said and try to improve their own lives by putting into practice the Christian teaching. This, in turn, should also positively affect the lives of those around them. It is only if we can find ways to enlarge the spread of the Gospel message – to love neighbour, self (and God!) – that we can ever begin to hope to avoid creating the environment for further international, national and personal victims of human violence and mistreatment.

And, this brings me nicely to the humble poppy, the public symbol worn for both Remembrance Sunday and Armistice Day (Wednesday 11th). The letters that make up its name, P-O-P-P-Y, might be seen to help us with achieving this task of widening the appeal of the Good News of Jesus. It works like this:
   People of God who need to see
O    Ourselves as a people who are in need of God’s forgiveness because of our
   Personal desire to live according to his teaching, so that we might bring
P    Peace and reconciliation with neighbours and those around us by always saying
Y    Yes, to God’s way; no, to the ways of the world.
Tough words, but to exercise the bravery of following them through as individuals will help turn our own weaknesses into God’s wider opportunities.  In turn, this bring about the transformation needed to avoid future conflicts that bring risk of adding to the number of those whose sacrifice we remember on this Remembrance Sunday.

A Christian Creed
We say (or sing!) together in faith

We believe in God the Father,
God almighty, by whose plan
earth and heaven sprang to being,
all created things began.
We believe in Christ the Saviour,
Son of God in human frame,
virgin-born, the child of Mary
upon whom the Spirit came.

Christ, who on the cross forsaken,
like a lamb to slaughter led,
suffered under Pontius Pilate,
he descended to the dead.
We believe in Jesus risen,
heaven’s king to rule and reign,
to the Father’s side ascended
till as judge he comes again.

We believe in God the Spirit;
in one Church, below, above:
saints of God in one communion,
one in holiness and love.
So by faith, our sins forgiven,
Christ our Saviour, Lord and friend,
we shall rise with him in glory
to the life that knows no end.
(May be sung to any 87.87.
or 87.87D. – e.g. ‘Alleluia, Alleluia, hearts to heaven…’ – tune.)

A suggestion for your Prayers

On this day of Remembrance, let us pray for all who suffer as a result of conflict,
and ask that God may give us peace:

for the service men and women who have died in the violence of war,
each one remembered by and known to God;
May God give peace.

for those who love them in death as in life,  
offering the distress of our grief and the sadness of our loss;
May God give peace

for all members of the armed forces who are in danger this day,
remembering family, friends and all who pray for their safe return;
May God give peace

for civilian men, women and children whose lives are disfigured by war or terror,
calling to mind in penitence the anger and hatreds of humanity;
May God give peace

for peace-makers and peace-keepers, who seek to keep this world secure and free;
May God give peace

for all who bear
the burden and privilege of leadership, political, military and religious;
asking for gifts of wisdom and resolve in the search for reconciliation and peace.
May God give peace

O God of truth and justice, we hold before you those
whose memory we cherish and those whose names we will never know.
Help us to lift our eyes above the torment of this broken world,
and grant us the grace to pray for those who wish us harm.
As we honour the past, may we put our faith in your future;
for you are the source of life and hope, now and for ever.        Amen.

Please also continue to pray for Moira and her family. Her mother died on Wednesday.

God our Father, help Moira and her family to face life as it now is
with courage and hope, knowing that you are always with them.
Help them not to think of the darkness of death,
but the splendour of life everlasting in your presence.
Comfort and support them, strengthen and uphold them,
until they meet again those they have loved and lost;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

We pray in the words that Jesus taught his first disciples:
Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

God of peace,
whose Son Jesus Christ proclaimed the Kingdom
and restored the broken to wholeness of life:
look with compassion on the anguish of the world,
and by your healing power
make whole both people and nations;
through our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

God, our refuge and strength,
bring near the day when wars shall cease
and poverty and pain shall end,
that earth may know the peace of heaven
through Jesus Christ our Lord;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

And, finally!!!

Thanks to Simon Juggins for these ten quick facts about Remembrance Day

  • The armistice, which called for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front, was signed by the Allies of World War 1 and Germany at Compiègne, France at 05:45 a.m. on 11 November 1918, and took effect at 11:00 a.m. that very morning – the ‘eleventh hour, of the eleventh day, of the eleventh month’ of 1918.
  • Fighting continued up to 11 a.m. with 2,738 men dying on the last day of the war.
  • The armistice initially expired after a period of 36 days and had to be extended several times. A formal peace agreement was only reached when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on 28 June 1919, five years to the day after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand that had directly led to the war.
  • Armistice Day was first observed in 1919.
  • From 1921 to 1930, Armistice Day services were held on the Monday of the week in which 11 November fell.
  • In 1931 the UK House of Commons passed a bill that changed the name to ‘Remembrance Day’ and decreed that people should pause in a moment of silence to honour and remember the men and women who have served, and continue to serve their nations during times of war, conflict and peace.
  • Poppies are used to remember those who have given their lives in battle because the flower grew in abundance on the silent battlefields after World War One ended.
  • Some 54 countries now observe Remembrance Day on or about the 11 November, although the name of the day varies, including: ‘Veterans Day’ in the USA; ‘Independence Day’ in Poland; and the ‘Day of National Unity of the Armed Forces’ in Italy.
  • New Zealand’s national day of remembrance is ‘Anzac Day’, on 25 April. This came about because the paper poppies intended for the first Armistice Day arrived by ship too late for the first 11 November event, so it was decided to distribute them at the next commemoration date, which happened to be ‘Anzac Day’, and the date stuck.
  • The German National Day of mourning is the secular public holiday of Volkstrauertag, which since 1952 has been observed two Sundays before the first Sunday of Advent; in practice this is the Sunday closest to 16 November. The anniversary of the signing of the armistice itself is not observed in Germany. Each of the major German churches has its own festivals for commemorating the dead, observed in November: ‘All Souls Day’ in the case of the Roman Catholic Church, and ‘Ewigkeitssonntag’ or ‘Eternity Sunday’ in the case of the Lutheran church.

As the quote often used at this time of year goes: “If we are to maintain our peace and freedom, we must always remember.”

 

A Call to Prayer

The Archbishops have written to all the clergy in the Church of England stating that their conviction that the first and primary response of the Church at this time was prayer.
“Bearing in mind our primary vocation as the Church of Jesus Christ to pray and to serve we call upon the Church of England to make this month of lockdown a month of prayer. More than anything else, whatever the nation thinks, we know that we are in the faithful hands of the risen Christ who knows our weaknesses, tiredness and struggles and whose steadfast love endures for ever.

Above all we recall people to some of the fundamental spiritual disciplines that shape our Christian life. How we do this is up to each congregation and clergy person. We will publish resources to support you before the first day of lockdown. During the first lockdown we cheered for the NHS every Thursday. During this second lockdown we invite you to fast in a way appropriate to you as well as pray for our nation every Thursday, for its leaders, its health and essential services and all those who suffer.”

The Archbishops, in consultation with the House of Bishops, decided that this call would take the form of an invitation to every Christian and person of goodwill to pray at 6pm every day for the period of this present lock-down. This call is going far and wide – and the hope is that many of our ecumenical partners will join us.

The Archbishops promised some resources in the form of different styles of written prayers with a particular thematic focus for prayer each day. The weblink to the resources is https://www.churchofengland.org/more/media-centre/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-churches/call-prayer-nation. In addition, there is a link there to a simple printable prayer booklet – ‘Prayer Booklet’.

This material is intended simply as one tool to enable participation – the hope is that individuals and worshipping communities make these times of prayer their own. There is no desire by the Archbishops to be directive in this – rather simply to encourage all to be united in Prayer for the Nation.

Notices.

Christmas will still happen …
Jennie Christie has supplies of Church Christmas cards (£4.00 for 10) and pens (£2.00 each) to sell. Contact: 01243 532642 or jennifer_christie_uk@hotmail.com

Update by Jenny Blamire on Revd. Jenny Green’s Work in Bradford
Jenny’s last prayer letter was written in March 2020. In it she highlighted some of the events of the previous year which give us a flavour of her work.

Last Christmas was a very busy time for her with many carol services in local church schools, in the churches where she works and in a hotel where a group of newly arrived refugees had been given space. On Christmas Day itself, Jenny and children shared lunch with a few lonely folk from their community.

Jenny wrote that joint church and community-run events are very popular in her area of Bradford and help the church to build bridges with the local community. One such event was a Victorian celebration of 170 years of St Matthew’s Church, one of the churches Jenny is attached to. Many people came and enjoyed the food and Victorian dancing.

One sad happening for the church was when a burglar broke into the church and caused much destruction. He was caught by a passing police patrol car. Jenny describes him as typical of those whose lives are ruined by addiction.

Jenny has continued to work with community groups and a handful of individuals who are on the edge of discovering faith in Jesus.

To bring you up to date, the big news is that Jenny has recently retired. I have written a card to send Jenny our best wishes for the future. We have been contacted by CMS to ask if we would consider supporting another missionary link. CMS has given us some suggestions and the new PCC will consider them (in due course – Ed).

Update on Potter’s Village
Potter’s Village is a child crisis centre, set up by Jenny Green in 2007, in the very poor area of Kisoro in SW Uganda. The village provides a home for up to 18 babies and very young children. As well there is now a medical centre with a nutritional unit and an anti-natal clinic. A great addition to the work of Potter’s Village in the past year has been the setting up of a rehab centre for children with disabilities. It was the work of a volunteer physio from the UK, who had extensive experience in rehabilitation. She has been training a nurse and an assistant to run the programme. The centre is open on Mondays and Tuesdays and after their initial assessment children and parents attend monthly and are taught exercises to do at home. Parents are also taught about the importance of stimulating play and social interaction and where necessary about feeding techniques. Some children have been supplied with special chairs, standing frames or walkers which are made by local carpenters. In parts of Uganda there is a lot of superstition and stigma about disability but the word is spreading that this new and much needed service has started.

There was an appeal recently to help keep the medical centre open and be able to pay staff during the pandemic. The funds were raised and the number of patients treated in the medical centre have continued to increase.

PV is a wonderful place and a demonstration of Jesus’ love.

 
ALL SAINTS TODAY – 1st November 2020

A short Act of Worship for All Saints’ Day from The Rev’d David Hider

THANK YOU for joining our weekly on-line act of worship.

Let us bring to mind our repeated failures to love

God, his people and his Creation:
                                            [Pause]

Come, let us return to the Lord and say:
Lord our God,
in our sin we have avoided your call.
Our love for you is like a morning cloud,
like the dew that goes away early.
Have mercy on us;
deliver us from judgement;
bind up our wounds and revive us;
in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
[c.f. Hosea 6]

May the God of love and power forgive you and free you from your sins,
heal and strengthen you by his Spirit,
and raise you to new life in Christ our Lord. Amen.

To which we respond, by saying:
Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

We pray the Collect for All Saints’ Day
Almighty God,
you have knit together your elect
in one communion and fellowship
in the mystical body of your Son Christ our Lord:
grant us grace so to follow your blessed saints in all virtuous and godly living
that we may come to those inexpressible joys
that you have prepared for those who truly love you;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

The Collect for the Fourth Sunday before Advent and following days
Almighty and eternal God,
you have kindled the flame of love
in the hearts of the saints:
grant to us the same faith and power of love,
that, as we rejoice in their triumphs,
we may be sustained by their example and fellowship;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the First Letter of John, chapter 1, verses 1 to 3
See what love the Father has given us, that we should be called children of God; and that is what we are. The reason the world does not know us is that it did not know him. Beloved, we are God’s children now; what we will be has not yet been revealed. What we do know is this: when he is revealed, we will be like him, for we will see him as he is. And all who have this hope in him purify themselves, just as he is pure.

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 5, verses 1 to 12
When Jesus saw the crowds, he went up the mountain; and after he sat down, his disciples came to him. Then he began to speak, and taught them, saying:
“Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted.
Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth.
Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled.
Blessed are the merciful, for they will receive mercy.
Blessed are the pure in heart, for they will see God.
Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God.
Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are you when people revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you.”

We reflect upon today’s Message prepared by John Shepherd

I’ve always been fascinated by the world of aviation.  The way it developed historically, with various pioneers pushing flights faster and longer is a powerful example of human endeavour.  One milestone, the rush to travel faster than sound, was particularly challenging.  After many failed attempts, often resulting in terrible accidents, the team at the US Air Force claimed that once speed exceeded the magic 768 miles per hour, things start working in reverse so controls need to be managed opposite to how they work below that speed.  I think this is something of an apocryphal tale, but, true or not, Chuck Yeager of the US Air Force was the first to safely achieve supersonic flight on 14 October 1947.  

This story came to my mind when reading this week’s Gospel.  Chapters 5-7 of Matthew contain the much-quoted Sermon on the Mount and today’s reading is the start of this, often referred to as the Beatitudes. This is a set of pronouncements by Jesus, each one (in many translations) starting with the words blessed are the….  

So, counter-intuitive though it might be, Jesus is being really clear about the variety of people who are as one with God.  For example, those in a lowly situation (such as the meek), or those in need (such as those suffering mourning or persecution) are blessed and so can know they have found favour with God.  Perhaps this was news to his audience on that Mount who might have seen such people as difficult to deal with and a long way from God.  Their blessings are not just an ambition or a prediction, they are Gospel in black and white courtesy of Matthew. Good news, happening in the here and now!!  Like the controls of a supersonic plane, some of the ways we view the world are turned upside down by these inspiring verses and indeed some of the other quotes from Jesus we have read in recent weeks as we progress through “Ordinary Time”.  

Today, 1 November, marks All Saints Day, the end of Ordinary Time.  Its a day when we remember the 10,000 or so people who have achieved the status of sainthood in one way or another.  Many of these are great examples to us today.  Their influence is all around us and their names frequently crop up in our day to day lives. Not only are most of our churches named from them, but in Chichester, they provide names for our hospital, at least one of our schools, our Christian bookshop, many of the city’s streets…The list is long and hopefully this reminds us of the great things many of them achieved. Indeed our Gospel writer for today, Matthew, is among the most prominent of Saints.  Its important though, as Jesus reminds us through the writings of St Matthew, to remember finding favour with God is not confined to these people. They might be examples and sign posts to the way but in fact, anyone (not least us) can do it.  Just look at the many groups singled out for mention in the beatitudes.  Jesus’ words must have provided inspiration to many who had become marginalised by a society increasingly distant from God’s word.  
Perhaps once in a while (as many of us are doing in these weird and troubled times) we need to look at things anew or even upside down like those 1940’s aviators, determined to break the sound barrier!!  

I hope you find the words (which are printed above in this mail) inspiring, a reason to question traditional thinking and a reminder of the headline message of All Saints Day.  Its not some kind of exclusive club, the grace of God is open to all

Do keep safe and God Bless

A Christian Creed
We say together in faith

Holy, holy, holy is the Lord God almighty, who was, and is, and is to come.

We believe in God the Father, who created all things:
for by his will they were created and have their being.

We believe in God the Son, who was slain:
for with his blood, he purchased us for God,
from every tribe and language, from every people and nation.

We believe in God the Holy Spirit: the Spirit and the Bride say, ‘Come!’
Even so come, Lord Jesus! Amen.
[c.f. Revelation 4:8,11;5:9;22:17,20]

A suggestion for your Prayers

Please continue with your prayers for Moira, her family and any known to you.

United in the company of all the faithful and looking for the coming of the Kingdom,
let us offer our prayers to God, the source of all life and holiness.

Merciful Lord, strengthen all Christian people by your Holy Spirit,
that we may live as a royal priesthood and a holy nation
to the praise of Jesus Christ our Saviour.

Bless Martin, Ruth and William our bishops, Moira and all ministers of your Church,
that by faithful proclamation of your word
we may be built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets
into a holy temple in the Lord.

Empower us by the gift of your holy and life-giving Spirit,
that we may be transformed into the likeness of Christ from glory to glory.

Give to the world and its peoples the peace that comes from above,
that they may find Christ’s way of freedom and life.

Hold in your embrace all who witness to your love
in the service of the poor and needy; all those who minister to the sick and dying;
and all who bring light to those in darkness.

Touch and heal all those whose lives are scarred by sin or disfigured by pain,
that, raised from death to life in Christ, their sorrow may be turned to eternal joy.

Remember in your mercy all those gone before us,
who have been well-pleasing to you from eternity;
preserve in your faith your servants on earth,
guide us to your kingdom, and grant us your peace at all times.

Hasten the day when many will come from east and west, from north and south,
and sit at table in your Kingdom.

We give you thanks for the whole company of your saints in glory,
with whom in fellowship we join our prayers and praises;
by your grace may we, like them, be made perfect in your love.

Blessing and glory and wisdom, thanksgiving and honour and power,
be to our God for ever and ever. Amen.

We pray in the words that Jesus taught his first disciples:

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

God, the source of all holiness and giver of all good things:
may we who have shared at this spiritual table
as strangers and pilgrims here on earth
be welcomed with all your saints
to the heavenly feast on the day of your kingdom;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

God of holiness,
your glory is proclaimed in every age:
as we rejoice in the faith of your saints,
inspire us to follow their example
with boldness and joy;
through Jesus Christ our Lord;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

Notices!!!

The funeral for the late Geoff Holland has been set for next Thursday (November 5th), 11:45am at Chichester Crematorium. The Service will be taken by his next door neighbour, the Revd Sue Burnett. She has asked Gay Dent [jlgadent@gmail.com] to collect the names of any Church member who might want to attend. Because of the pandemic restrictions, numbers are limited. Thank you, Gay, for doing this.

 
We will remember 2020
This is a reprint of Moira’s midweek message:

“Dear all, despite all the restrictions that we are facing this year, we will remember once more all those who have given their lives for our freedom.
    To enable as many people as possible to attend a service this year we will hold two Remembrance services. The first will be on Sunday 8th November, at Apuldram church following the 8.00 a.m. service. The second will be on Sunday 15th November, 9.30 a.m.** at Fishbourne church.
    Although our churches can only hold a certain number of people we can all still remember. I know how artistic so many of you are, and so I invite you to create a poster, perhaps with a poppy or of an image you would like to use which depicts this important time, add the words, ‘we will Remember’. Then put the poster in your window as so many did with the Rainbow pictures. Let’s fill our communities’ windows with these. If you can’t make your own, perhaps you could ask one of our talented young people to paint you one.
    Another lovely idea, especially for those of you who love the beach, is to collect a stone, paint a poppy on it with the year 2020, and place your stone in one of our churchyards, in Apuldram by the war memorial, and in Fishbourne below the notice board with the plaque on it.
    Then lastly, on the 11th day, of the 11th month, at the 11th hour, let us all stop, stand at our front doors if we are able to, keep a minute’s silence and Remember.
    May it be, that,  From the going down of the sun, and in the morning, We will Remember them.”

[** The Act of Remembrance will take place within the Service of Holy Communion.]

Jennie Christie still has supplies of Church Christmas cards (£4.00 for 10) and pens (£2.00 each) to sell. Contact: 01243 532642 or jennifer_christie_uk@hotmail.com

LAST SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY – 25th October 2020
From Rev’d David Hider

THANK YOU for joining our weekly on-line a

ct of worship.
Today is also known as Bible Sunday (see the Collect below).
Let us bring to mind our repeated failures to love

God, his people and his Creation:
                                            [Pause]
God our Father,
long-suffering, full of grace and truth,
you create us from nothing and give us life.
You give your faithful people new life in the water of baptism.
You do not turn your face from us, nor cast us aside.
We confess that we have sinned against you and our neighbour.
We have wounded your love and marred your image in us.
Restore us for the sake of your Son, and bring us to heavenly joy,
in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

May the God of love and power forgive you and free you from your sins,
heal and strengthen you by his Spirit,
and raise you to new life in Christ our Lord. Amen.

To which we respond, by saying:
Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

We pray the Collect (this week’s Special Prayer)

Blessed Lord,
who caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning:
help us so to hear them,
to read, mark, learn and inwardly digest them
that, through patience, and the comfort of your holy word,
we may embrace and for ever hold fast the hope of everlasting life,
which you have given us in our Saviour Jesus Christ,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the First Letter of Paul to the Thessalonians, chapter 2, verses 1 to 8

You yourselves know, brothers and sisters, that our coming to you was not in vain, but though we had already suffered and been shamefully mistreated at Philippi, as you know, we had courage in our God to declare to you the gospel of God in spite of great opposition. For our appeal does not spring from deceit or impure motives or trickery, but just as we have been approved by God to be entrusted with the message of the gospel, even so we speak, not to please mortals, but to please God who tests our hearts. As you know and as God is our witness, we never came with words of flattery or with a pretext for greed; nor did we seek praise from mortals, whether from you or from others, though we might have made demands as apostles of Christ. But we were gentle among you, like a nurse tenderly caring for her own children. So deeply do we care for you that we are determined to share with you not only the gospel of God but also our own selves, because you have become very dear to us.

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 22, verses 34 to 46

When the Pharisees heard that he had silenced the Sadducees, they gathered together, and one of them, a lawyer, asked him a question to test him. ‘Teacher, which commandment in the law is the greatest?’ He said to him, ‘‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind.’ This is the greatest and first commandment. And a second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbour as yourself.’ On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.’

Now while the Pharisees were gathered together, Jesus asked them this question: ‘What do you think of the Messiah? Whose son is he?’ They said to him, ‘The son of David.’ He said to them, ‘How is it then that David by the Spirit calls him Lord, saying, ‘The Lord said to my Lord, ‘Sit at my right hand, until I put your enemies under your feet’’? If David thus calls him Lord, how can he be his son?’ No one was able to give him an answer, nor from that day did anyone dare to ask him any more questions.

We reflect upon today’s Message
According to today’s Gospel as it is presented, the Pharisee did not actually say a prayer. But, from the context, it does not take too much imagination to invent ‘the Pharisee’s prayer’. Given his attitude to Jesus, he might well have prayed, ‘Please, God, help me get the better of him’. Yes, there is malice in the Pharisee’s approach. And, as for Leviticus and the injunction ‘not to nurse hatred towards your brother’ (19:17), forget that!  Pharisees have to protect the Law and to trap any man who appears above the Law. Hence, the question: ‘Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law’?

We can get the impression that, whatever Jesus said in reply, it would not have mattered. The Pharisee’s mind was made up. Some people are like that, aren’t they? A genuine change of heart is impossible and a radical conversion is out of the question.

Sometimes editors – even Gospel editors – deploy this incident in the life of Jesus in a different way. For example, in Mark’s Gospel, the person who asks the question about ‘the greatest commandment’ is a Scribe. But, both his approach, and Jesus’ reply, is different. From Mark (chapter 12), we get the impression that the Scribe is favourably disposed to Jesus and, when the conversation ends, Jesus commends him saying: ‘You are not far from the Kingdom of God.’

As for Matthew’s Pharisee, he is a completely different kettle of fish. Continuing the encounter, Jesus asks his own question: ‘The Messiah: whose Son is he?’ The Pharisee answered: ‘The Son of David’. For him, the Messiah would trace his earthly paternity to David. This Pharisee saw things from a human perspective. Of course, some people are like him, aren’t they? As for the Scribe in Mark’s Gospel, the Messiah would trace his paternity to God – he saw things from a divine perspective. And, some people are like him, aren’t they? When they approach Jesus, they as good as pray: ‘Please God, help me to be like Him.’

‘Please God, help me get the better of him’. ‘Please God, help me be like Him.’  Depending on our standpoint, both are legitimate prayers. Now, some of the prayers we utter are significant – they change lives. Yet, at the same time, it is also true that many of the prayers that we utter are forgotten – they die a death.

It is no great secret that I struggled while training for ordained ministry. The academic nature of the learning with lots of texts and difficult-to-pronounce words (and their meaning) to overcome. Sometimes, I was belittled by tutors for my lack of apparent prowess with these studies. So, I can relate to the first of those prayers and, in some ways, I did ‘get the better’ of them – because I satisfied the examiners and was duly ordained. However, the second prayer is something that I struggled – and, if truth be told, still struggle – with. I would say it with a genuine attitude, but I still lacked the faith and prowess to carry the resultant demands. Talking these matters through with my Spiritual Director – a wise elderly priest – of those times, he spoke of three prayers that might help me and (if I remember correctly) gave them these names:
    first, ‘the shipwreck prayer’ – ‘Please God, get me out of this’;
    second, ‘the castaway’s prayer’ – ‘Please God, help me face up to life’s here and now’;
    third, ‘everyone’s prayer’ – ‘Please God, help me love my neighbour as myself’.

Some of the prayers that mark us for life are rooted in people. None more so than ‘the shipwreck prayer’ – a prayer that is a kind of ‘covenant’ that we make with God (e.g. ‘do this for me, God, and I’ll do something in return’). When God answers the prayer – even a little – as he always does (but not necessarily as we demand!), we must keep our word also.    

‘The castaway’s prayer’ is much more ‘matter of fact’ and helps us to realise that God is with us in our present realities to help us cope with our own ‘here and now’. Sometimes, he is carrying us through the mire of our situations.

The third prayer, ‘everyone’s prayer’, is one that that we dare not avoid. Two words in that prayer, ‘neighbour’ and ‘myself‘, remind us that, as John Donne wrote: ‘No man is an Island, entire of it self; every man is a piece of the Continent, a part of the main.’ (Devotions [1624]). All of us are inter-related, that what we do, near or far, affects another human being, or a whole community, or even the life of the planet itself.

In summary, it is ‘what we do about what we pray’ that reveals our true faith. The Pharisee’s prayer was a negative, selfish prayer which stopped him growing beyond the confines of his belief. These other three prayers – the shipwreck’s prayer, the castaway’s prayer and everyone’s prayer – can be positive and creative as each demands that we see ourselves, our circumstances and our neighbours in a new light. And, that light is the Gospel light of a Jesus who challenged the Pharisees – and who, most definitely, challenges each and every one of us, including me.

A Christian Creed
We say together in faith

Holy, holy, holy is the Lord God almighty, who was, and is, and is to come.

We believe in God the Father, who created all things:
for by his will they were created and have their being.

We believe in God the Son, who was slain:
for with his blood, he purchased us for God,
from every tribe and language, from every people and nation.

We believe in God the Holy Spirit: the Spirit and the Bride say, ‘Come!’
Even so come, Lord Jesus! Amen.
[c.f. Revelation 4:8,11;5:9;22:17,20]

A suggestion for your Prayers

Please continue with your prayers for Moira, her family and any known to you.

We pray for strength to follow Jesus.
Jesus said: ‘Whoever wishes to be great among you must be your servant.’
Saviour, we hear your call.

Jesus said: ‘Unless you change and become humble like little children,
you can never enter the kingdom of heaven.’
Saviour, we hear your call.

Jesus said: ‘Happy are the humble; they will receive what God has promised.’
Saviour, we hear your call.

Jesus said: ‘Be merciful as your Father is merciful;
love your enemies and do good to them.’
Saviour, we hear your call.

Jesus said: ‘Love one another, as I love you;
there is no greater love than this, to lay down your life for your friends.’
Saviour, we hear your call.

Jesus said: ‘Go to people everywhere and make them my disciples,
and I will be with you always, to the end of time.’
Saviour, we hear your call.

God of mercy,
you know us and love us and hear our prayer:
keep us in the eternal fellowship of Jesus Christ our Saviour. Amen.

We pray in the words that Jesus taught his first disciples:
Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Lord God, you have taught us to pray to you as ‘Our Father’:
help us to see the world through your eyes and to love your children with your love; and show us how we can share with them the knowledge of your Fatherhood
and an experience of your redeeming grace,
in your Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

God of all grace,
your Son Jesus Christ fed the hungry with the bread of his life
and the word of his Kingdom:
renew your people with your heavenly grace,
and in all our weakness sustain us by your true and living bread;
who is alive and reigns, now and for ever. Amen.

Merciful God,
teach us to be faithful in change and uncertainty,
that trusting in your word
and obeying your will
we may enter the unfailing joy of Jesus Christ our Lord;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

Notices!!!

Hopefully, you have remembered to put your clocks back one hour to mark the end of British Summer Time!

The funeral for the late Geoff Holland has been set for Thursday 5th November, 11:45am at Chichester Crematorium. The Service will be taken by his next door neighbour, the Revd Sue Burnett. She has asked Gay Dent [jlgadent@gmail.com] to collect the names of any Church member who might want to attend. Because of the pandemic restrictions, numbers are limited. Thank you, Gay, for doing this essential task.

Remembrance Sunday will be marked during Church Services at Apuldram on November 8th and Fishbourne on November 15th. Necessarily, these may not take the form of previous years, but will still be sensitive to the occasion.

Jennie Christie still has supplies of Church Christmas cards (£4.00 for 10) and pens (£2.00 each) to sell. Contact: 01243 532642 or jennifer_christie_uk@hotmail.com

 
TRINITY 19 – Sunday 18th October 2020
From Rev’d David Hider.

THANK YOU for joining our weekly on-line act of worship.

Let us bring to mind our repeated failures to love God, his people and his Creation:
                                            [Pause]
Lord God,
we have sinned against you;
we have done evil in your sight.
We are sorry and repent.
Have mercy on us according to your love.
Wash away our wrongdoing and cleanse us from our sin.
Renew a right spirit within us
and restore us to the joy of your salvation,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.                   

[c.f. Psalm 51]

May the Father of all mercies
cleanse us from our sins,
and restore us in his image

to the praise and glory of his name,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

To which we respond, by saying:
Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

We pray the Collect (this week’s Special Prayer)

O God, forasmuch as without you
we are not able to please you;
mercifully grant that your Holy Spirit
may in all things direct and rule our hearts;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the First Letter of Paul to the Thessalonians, chapter 1, verses 1 to 10

From Paul, Silvanus, and Timothy, To the church of the Thessalonians in God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ: Grace to you and peace.

We always give thanks to God for all of you and mention you in our prayers, constantly remembering before our God and Father your work of faith and labour of love and steadfastness of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ. For we know, brothers and sisters beloved by God, that he has chosen you, because our message of the gospel came to you not in word only, but also in power and in the Holy Spirit and with full conviction; just as you know what kind of persons we proved to be among you for your sake. And you became imitators of us and of the Lord, for in spite of persecution you received the word with joy inspired by the Holy Spirit, so that you became an example to all the believers in Macedonia and in Achaia. For the word of the Lord has sounded forth from you not only in Macedonia and Achaia, but in every place your faith in God has become known, so that we have no need to speak about it. For the people of those regions report about us what kind of welcome we had among you, and how you turned to God from idols, to serve a living and true God, and to wait for his Son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead – Jesus, who rescues us from the wrath that is coming.

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 22, verses 15 to 22

When the chief priests and Pharisees had heard the parables, they realised that Jesus was speaking about them. Then the Pharisees went and plotted to entrap him in what he said. So they sent their disciples to him, along with the Herodians, saying, “Teacher, we know that you are sincere, and teach the way of God in accordance with truth, and show deference to no one; for you do not regard people with partiality. Tell us, then, what you think. Is it lawful to pay taxes to the emperor, or not?” But Jesus, aware of their malice, said, “Why are you putting me to the test, you hypocrites? Show me the coin used for the tax.” And they brought him a denarius. Then he said to them, “Whose head is this, and whose title?” They answered, “The emperor’s.” Then he said to them, “Give therefore to the emperor the things that are the emperor’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” When they heard this, they were amazed; and they left him and went away.

We reflect upon today’s Message written by Jenny

As a child, when I heard this story from Matthew’s Gospel, I used to think how clever Jesus was to give such a good answer! But as a child I had no idea of the principles Jesus was teaching or what it might mean in real life situations for people. I hadn’t heard of Bonhoeffer for example, when he came into conflict with those in power in his country of Germany only a dozen years before and how it cost his life.

This question, “Is it lawful to pay taxes to the emperor, or not?” posed by the Pharisees, who usually opposed the Roman occupation, was not because they wanted Jesus’ teaching on church/state matters but rather they wanted him by his answer to provide evidence they could use to get Jesus condemned to death. Here they have even joined forces with their bitter enemies, the Herodians, a political party supporting the Romans.

The much hated tax the Pharisees were talking about was one that had been introduced when Judea became a Roman province in 6AD. Each person had to pay a head or poll tax, which could only be paid with a Roman coin. The image of the emperor and inscription on it was considered blasphemous by Jews. The money went straight into Caesar’s coffers and some of it was spent on pagan temples.

If we look at the question again, whichever way Jesus answered it he’d have been in dire trouble. In his answer, “Give therefore to the emperor the things that are the emperor’s, and to God the things that are God’s,” he lay down an important principle to follow, one that still applies today. We all belong to the country where we live. We share in the public services, in our country’s education system and its healthcare and so much more. In return we have to be good citizens.

As Christians we also belong to the kingdom of God. Similarly we’re to be good citizens of that kingdom and give to God the things that are God’s. As we think about our dual citizenship, we can see that what is God’s is of a completely different order to any earthly kingdom. From Psalm 96, “But the Lord made the heavens. Splendour and majesty are before him, strength and glory are in his sanctuary.” Jesus is saying belonging to God’s kingdom, if ever there were a clash with our earthly citizenship, should take priority.

We’re so blessed in our country to be able to practise our faith freely but thousands of our brothers and sisters in Christ are persecuted for theirs. How often do we remember to pray for them or take the trouble to find out about their lives? Following Jesus can bring very real danger. Persecuted Christians can be denied education and work opportunities, put on false charges and imprisoned, assaulted and abused. They may not be able to go to church freely. Some churches have been bombed. Nearly three thousand Christians died for their faith last year.

“Open Doors” is a charity supporting the persecuted church. Search “Open Doors World Watch List 2020” for much more information. I feel so humbled when I hear what suffering others go through and I wonder how strong my faith would be.

Give to God the things that are God’s. I can hear my Mum’s voice in my head. When I was growing up she used to say, “You can never out-give God.” What can we give God? May be there’s a clue in our first reading to the church at Thessalonica. Paul praised them for their faith, love and hope. (v3) Even these three things were a gift from God.

God calls us to respond to his love with faith and simply come to him and ask for his forgiveness when we’ve gone astray. In the words of the Christmas carol, “What can I give him? Give my heart.” God wants us to give him our hearts.

As we receive God’s love, God will give us a love for others, so we can reach out to those around us with kindness and share the good news about Jesus with them.

Hope is so needed in the circumstances we find the whole world in today and in the situations that affect us personally. But hope is one of the gifts God gives. The Thessalonians received the word of God with joy (v6) and that is where they found their hope. I have a much loved notebook. In it I write down some of the wonderful promises in the Bible. Looking through my last three entries I can see Psalm 33:20-22, Matthew 11:28-30 and Psalm 103:11-12. These words lift my heart.

We had a letter, a brown envelope, from a government department this morning. It was actually giving us back some road tax but had a warning on the envelope, “Tax it or lose it.” As citizens of our country we must obey its laws. As citizens of God’s kingdom we respond freely and His blessings are of a completely different order. What else keeps our brothers and sisters of the persecuted church faithful to Christ? Please remember to pray for them today.

A Christian Creed
Let us declare our faith in the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Christ died for our sins
in accordance with the Scriptures;
he was buried;
he was raised to life on the third day
in accordance with the Scriptures;
afterwards he appeared to his followers,
and to all the apostles:
this we have received,
and this we believe. Amen.

A suggestion for your Prayers

In the power of the Spirit and in union with Christ, let us pray to the Father.

For the peace of the whole world,
for the welfare of the Holy Church of God,
and for the unity of all;
let us pray to the Lord.

For Martin, Ruth and William our bishops,
for the leaders of our sister Churches,
and for all clergy, especially Moira, and people within their pastoral care;
let us pray to the Lord.

For Elizabeth our Queen,
for the leaders of the nations, including our own in these difficult times,
and for all in authority;
let us pray to the Lord.

For these communities of Fishbourne and Apuldram,
for every city, town and village,
and for all the people who live and work within them;
let us pray to the Lord.

For good weather, and for abundant harvests for all to share;
let us pray to the Lord.

For those who travel by land, air, or water,
for the sick and the suffering, including any known to us,
for prisoners and captives,
and for their safety, health and salvation;
for those who have recently died, including Geoff Holland;
for the dying and any who are bereft in grief;
let us pray to the Lord.

For our deliverance from all affliction, strife and need,
and for the absolution of our sins and offences;
let us pray to the Lord.

Remembering all who have gone before us in faith,
and in communion with all the saints,
we commit ourselves, one another, and our whole life to Christ our God;
to you, O Lord. Amen.

We pray in the words that Jesus taught his first disciples:
Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Holy and blessed God,
you have fed us spiritually with the body and blood of your Son
and filled us with your Holy Spirit:
may we honour you,
not only with our lips
but in lives dedicated to the service
of Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Faithful Lord,
whose steadfast love never ceases
and whose mercies never come to an end:
grant us the grace to trust you
and to receive the gifts of your love,
new every morning,
in Jesus Christ our Lord;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

Notices
(And what would an act of worship be without this item!)

Please see last Tuesday’s electronic communication for details about:
a forthcoming Church cleaning event on Thursday 22nd October at 10am;
the sale of Church Christmas cards (£4.00 for 10 cards) and pens (£2.00 each).
Contact for both the above is Jennie Christie: Telephone: 01243 532642 or email jennifer_christie_uk@hotmail.com

Plus, there is a response from Gillian Ellis following her recent well deserved legal appointment.

You can read this newsletter here.

 
TRINITY 18.

11th October 2020

A short act of worship from Rev’d David HiderTHANK YOU for joining our weekly on-line act of worship.

Let us bring to mind our repeated failures to love God, his people and his Creation:
                                            [Pause]

Almighty God,
long-suffering and of great goodness:
we confess with our whole hearts
our neglect and forgetfulness of your commandments,
our wrong doing, thinking, and speaking;
the hurts we have done to others,
and the good we have left undone.
O God, forgive us, for we have sinned against you;
and raise us to newness of life;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

May the God of love and power forgive us and free us from our sins,
heal and strengthen us by his Spirit, and raise us to new life in Christ our Lord. Amen.

To which we respond, by saying:

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

We pray the Collect (this week’s Special Prayer)

Almighty and everlasting God,
increase in us your gift of faith
that, forsaking what lies behind
and reaching out to that which is before,
we may run the way of your commandments
and win the crown of everlasting joy;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the Letter of Paul to the Philippians, chapter 4, verses 1 to 9

My brothers and sisters, whom I love and long for, my joy and crown, stand firm in the Lord in this way, my beloved.

I urge Euodia and I urge Syntyche to be of the same mind in the Lord. Yes, and I ask you also, my loyal companion, help these women, for they have struggled beside me in the work of the gospel, together with Clement and the rest of my co-workers, whose names are in the book of life.

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honourable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing the things that you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, and the God of peace will be with you.

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 22, verses 1 to 14

Once more Jesus spoke to them in parables, saying: “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who gave a wedding banquet for his son. He sent his slaves to call those who had been invited to the wedding banquet, but they would not come. Again he sent other slaves, saying, ‘Tell those who have been invited: Look, I have prepared my dinner, my oxen and my fat calves have been slaughtered, and everything is ready; come to the wedding banquet.’ But they made light of it and went away, one to his farm, another to his business, while the rest seized his slaves, mistreated them, and killed them. The king was enraged. He sent his troops, destroyed those murderers, and burned their city. Then he said to his slaves, ‘The wedding is ready, but those invited were not worthy. Go therefore into the main streets, and invite everyone you find to the wedding banquet.’ Those slaves went out into the streets and gathered all whom they found, both good and bad; so the wedding hall was filled with guests.

“But when the king came in to see the guests, he noticed a man there who was not wearing a wedding robe, and he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you get in here without a wedding robe?’ And he was speechless. Then the king said to the attendants, ‘Bind him hand and foot, and throw him into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’ For many are called, but few are chosen.”

We reflect upon today’s Message

Thankfully, even at this distance of time from their writing, the Gospel still knows the tremendous pressures of our daily life – and, especially, at this time of having to deal with the on-going effects on our lives of coronavirus. It knows exactly what pulls us this way and that. It knows precisely that we live by necessity as well as by choice. It knows absolutely all the vital and important things we must do. But, it also asks, even amid all this and more, whether we respond with promptness, enthusiasm and joy to this final and decisive invitation of Jesus to the wedding banquet? And, let us all be sure to remember that our decision could make all the difference in the world to our eternal future!

I wonder whether you noticed that, at the end of the parable forming today’s Gospel text, there was introduced a character who attended the wedding banquet without a wedding garment – the man who arrived at the feast without dressing up for it, the clown who showed up at the party in his old clothes? Did you notice the rough treatment that this character received from the host? Yes, this joker actually wanted to come to God’s party, but did not want to change his wardrobe – or, put another way, did not want to make the effort to change his spiritual clothing.

In today’s text, Matthew is saying this:
    the most crucial choice that we make is what kind of world we are choosing to live in;
    how we are going to treat others in it;
    and, how much we understand ourselves to be in solidarity with all of humankind, especially with those who get the short end of the stick.
 
Let us not be mistaken, commitment to the kind of community that God wants in this world entails – for each one and everyone of us:
    a change of attitude;
    a change of values;
    a change of goals;
    a different set of loyalties;
    a different way of apportioning time, abilities and money;
    a different scale of values and attention to relationships;
    and, a different set of priorities towards people and property.

For some, it may also involve:
    a change of vocation or career;
    a reassessment of lifestyle;
    or, whatever God may ask us to do.

And, if it does not involve some – or all – of these things, then, our professions of faith, our vows of discipleship, our positive RSVPs to the banquet may be empty, fraudulent and worth no more than a niche in hell!

When times were normal and we were able to hold proper Services in Church (do you remember those days?), there were times when I looked out at some of you with a feeling of great sadness. The glazed eyes; the internal clock on which you are relying to tell that my sermon-time was nearly up; the mental switch-off which said “here he goes again”! Sure, I have never claimed to be the best preacher in the world – or, now, the best author of these messages. But, I do try, at every opportunity, with whatever fragment of talent God has given to me, to bring to your attention the detail of the Christian faith. Or, in other words, the things which you ought consider for your spiritual health, both this side of death and beyond. My heart aches and pleads that you do just this! As Jesus said: “You never know the hour …!” (e.g. Matthew 25:13) Yet, as has been often said at the Church door following a Service: “It’s all a matter of faith, Vicar!” Or, sadly, for some, blind faith.

You might remember this little story. Two nuns were crossing the desert in their hired four-wheel-drive Range Rover when it ran out of petrol. Remembering that they had passed a petrol station only a mile or so back, the nuns searched the back of their vehicle for a container. All they could find was a child’s potty. Being better than nothing, they took the potty, walked back to the petrol station, explained their predicament to the owner, filled their unusual container and returned to their vehicle. As they were carefully pouring the liquid into the filler-tube of the vehicle, a magnificent gold-coloured, stretched limousine drew up. As the darkened, rear electric-window slowly slid down, a man put his head out and – watching the nuns pouring the contents of the potty into the petrol-tank – said:  “I might not share your religion, but I do admire your faith!” For him, a sure case of blind faith!

So, have we got it? Have we understood this crucial choice that faces us? We must treat our Lord’s invitation with the urgency that it deserves. And, for the sake of what God wants for human life on this earth – just as we would for a royal banquet – we should be prepared:
    to accept the invitation;
    to honour our host;
    and, for this high and joyous occasion, redesign our (spiritual) wardrobes.

As Jesus said: ‘For many are called, but few are chosen.’ Thankfully, St Paul encourages: ‘Keep on doing the things that you have learned and received and heard and seen, and the God of peace will be with you.’

A Christian Creed
We believe in God the Father,
from whom every family in heaven and on earth is named.

We believe in God the Son,
who lives in our hearts through faith, and fills us with his love.

We believe in God the Holy Spirit, who strengthens us with power from on high.

We believe in one God; Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Amen.

A suggestion for your Prayers
We pray for strength to follow Jesus. Saviour, we hear your call. Help us to follow.

Jesus said: ‘Whoever wishes to be great among you must be your servant.’

Jesus said: ‘Unless you change and become humble like little children,
you can never enter the kingdom of heaven.’

Jesus said: ‘Happy are the humble; they will receive what God has promised.’

Jesus said: ‘Be merciful as your Father is merciful;
love your enemies and do good to them.’

Jesus said: ‘Love one another, as I love you; there is no greater love than this,
to lay down your life for your friends.’

Jesus said: ‘Go to people everywhere and make them my disciples,
and I will be with you always, to the end of time.’

God of mercy, you know us and love us and hear our prayer:
keep us in the eternal fellowship of Jesus Christ our Saviour. Amen.

We pray in the words that Jesus taught his first disciples:
Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

We praise and thank you, O Christ, for this sacred feast:
for here we receive you,
here the memory of your passion is renewed,
here our minds are filled with grace,
and here a pledge of future glory is given,
when we shall feast at that table where you reign with all your saints for ever. Amen.

Lord, we have but one life to live,
the life you have given to us, the life you have redeemed.
Help us to make the best use of it and not to waste it or fritter is away.
Show us your plan and purpose for our life,
and let it be our joy to do your will and serve you all our days.
Lord, let us not live to be useless, for Jesus Christ’s sake. Amen.

God, our Judge and Saviour,
teach us to be open to your truth
and to trust in your love,
that we may live each day
with confidence in the salvation which is given
through Jesus Christ our Lord;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

 
 

TRINITY 17. 4th October 2020Good morning everyone, I trust that you are all well. Thank you for joining us once again.

The Lord be with you.

Almighty God, to whom all hearts are open, all desires known, and from whom no secrets are hidden;
Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit,
That we may perfectly love you, and worthily magnify your Holy Name; through Christ our Lord. Amen.

We say sorry for those times we have taken for granted the many Blessings God has poured into our lives.

Most merciful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we confess that we have sinned in thought, word and deed.
We have not loved you with our whole heart. We have not loved our neighbours as ourselves.
In your mercy forgive what we have been, help us to amend what we are, and direct what we shall be, that we may do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with you, our God. Amen.

Almighty God, who forgives all who truly repent, have mercy upon you, pardon and deliver you from all your sins, confirm and strengthen you in all goodness, and keep you in life eternal; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

The Gloria.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to His people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
We worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.

Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the world: have mercy upon us,
You are seated at the right hand of the Father, receive our prayer.

For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
You alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
In the glory of God, the Father. Amen

The Collect Prayer. (The special weekly prayer)

Almighty God, you have made us for yourself and our hearts are restful till they find their rest in you: pour your love into our hearts and draw us to yourself, and so bring us at last to your heavenly city where we shall see you face to face; through Jesus Christ, your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.

Today’s Readings.

Philippians 3: v.4b-14

Matthew 21: 33-46

Sermon for Fishbourne.

One effect of lockdown appears to have been an increase in interest in gardening and horticulture.  Like millions of others, I try to keep awake on Fridays for Gardeners World!!  Allotments have received more attention than usual and perhaps provide a way of enjoying some safe social contact in these strange days.  Many of my friends enjoy tending allotments and see the rent they have to pay as real value for money when you weigh up the friendliness, produce and exercise that allotments provide.

Something similar happened back in biblical days.  People with money to invest would buy up land, set it up to produce various crops and then let it out to tenants who would care for it and share the produce with the owner as a form of payment.    

This weeks Gospel Reading is often called the parable of the wicked tenants. Coming after the Palm Sunday entry into Jerusalem, it’s a story told by Jesus in the last few days before the crucifixion, when his relationship with the authorities was very strained.

It tells of a man who set up some of his land as a vineyard, complete with some of the equipment needed to make wine.  Being security conscious, he was also careful to fence it securely and built a watchtower to enable early warning of anyone intending to trespass.  

He then let out the vineyard and, as was traditional at harvest time, he sent his servants to collect his share of the produce.  Unfortunately, the tenants wouldn’t give anything and they dealt severely with the servants, including killing one of them.

Needing to find a way to apply more pressure, the landowner sends his son to collect his dues.  He couldn’t believe they wouldn’t respect a family member and acquiesce where before they had played hardball.  Again, they refused to part with any produce and went as far as to kill the son, hoping, by dint of the law at that time, to inherit the property.  

 If you put Israel in place of the vineyard, God as the landowner, the son as Jesus, the prophets as the servants and God’s grace as the produce, Jesus’ meaning becomes clear.  Gods people unable to share Gods grace and rejecting those God sends, both prophets and, indeed, his only son.  Unsurprisingly this story went down very badly with Jewish authorities. They would have arrested him then and there, had it not been for a large enthusiastic and highly supportive audience.  

As we make our way through the twenty first century, being reminded of this story is no bad thing.  As well as increasing our interest in horticulture, perhaps Covid will heighten our awareness of each other and make us more open to God’s word and his efforts to communicate them to us.   Lets take the wicked tenants as clear examples of how not to behave!!
   
Do keep safe and God Bless

This week we pray for:

Our churches and all who work so hard to care for our buildings.
Those who work in our local shops.
Those who are worried about losing their jobs or homes.
Our families, friends and neighbours.
Those who are unwell either at home or in hospital.
Young students as they face such uncertainty at the beginning of this term.
Those who have recently died, their families and those who face their dying in the coming weeks.
Almighty God, you have promised to hear the prayers of those who ask in your Son’s name; we pray that what we have asked faithfully we may obtain effectively; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

The Peace of the Lord be always with you.

In our hearts let us send a message of peace to our friends and neighbours.

Notices.

Please do note the change of time for Fishbourne’s APCM, although you may join the meeting by zoom, you may also attend by coming into the hall, Moira will host the meeting from there.
As Covid numbers continue to rise, please do keep safe, let us all play our part in keeping others safe, let us never forget, we are in this together.
If you book a place to attend a service, but then find that you are unable to come, please can you un-book your seat so that someone else can come.
I will be heading back up to Scotland on the 12th October, to be with my Mum and help care for her. She has now been told she has just a few weeks left to live. Be assured, services will continue in one form or another, at the same times and places.

Let us pray:

Lord, we pray that your grace may always precede and follow us, and make us continually to be given to all good works; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The Blessing.

May the road rise up to meet you,
The wind be always at your back.
The sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall softly on your fields,
And, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand.

The blessing of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit be upon us, this day and always. Amen.

And so be at peace, with God, with yourself and with those around you.

Have a great week and don’t forget to keep an eye on your neighbours to make sure they are still doing ok especially do be on the alert for any families that have to isolate as they await the results of Covid tests.

Love and prayers to you all, Moira

 
TRINITY 16 – HARVEST

27th September 2020

Good morning everyone, I trust that you are all well. Thank you for joining us once again.

The Land has yielded its harvest, God has blessed us. Psalm 85 v.12

If you wish you might like to sing: We plough the fields and scatter.

The Lord be with you.

Almighty God, to whom all hearts are open, all desires known, and from whom no secrets are hidden;
Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit,
That we may perfectly love you, and worthily magnify your Holy Name; through Christ our Lord. Amen.

We say sorry for those times we have forgotten how much God loves us.

Most merciful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we confess that we have sinned in thought, word and deed.
We have not loved you with our whole heart. We have not loved our neighbours as ourselves.
In your mercy forgive what we have been, help us to amend what we are, and direct what we shall be, that we may do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with you, our God. Amen.

Almighty God, who forgives all who truly repent, have mercy upon you, pardon and deliver you from all your sins, confirm and strengthen you in all goodness, and keep you in life eternal; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

The Gloria.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to His people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
We worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.

Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the world: have mercy upon us,
You are seated at the right hand of the Father, receive our prayer.

For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
You alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
In the glory of God, the Father. Amen

The Collect Prayer. (The special weekly prayer)

Almighty and everlasting God, we offer you our hearty thanks for your fatherly goodness and care in giving us the fruits of the earth in their seasons. Give us grace to use them rightly, to your glory, for our own wellbeing, and for the relief of those in need. Through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Today’s Readings.

Gen. 1 v. 1-3 and v. 24-31a

John 6 v. 27-35

And God saw all that He had made, and indeed it was very good.

We reflect upon today’s message

Today, with churches up and down the country we give thanks to God for Harvest time, for those who provide our food and for those who work on the land and sea. We also pause to appreciate the created world around us.

Normally we would have had a big celebration in our churches with many people bringing gifts of food stuff to share with others. Due to Covid, this year it is different, numbers at services have to be restricted and great care has to be taken when passing items from one person to another, but that does not mean we cannot celebrate or give.

We just need to do it in a different way. This year I encourage you to fill a small box with goodies, (do wipe them over first), then take the box to a neighbour who perhaps lives alone, or a person you know who is in need. This is perhaps an old-fashioned way to celebrate harvest, many of us can still remember taking boxes of food to people in our communities, just a small gift, but none the less a lovely thing to do.

It is a positive way in which we can share what we have and make a difference to another person’s life, without expecting anything in return.

As the days get shorter, the nights draw in, and the rules about the virus keep changing, many people may be feeling more anxious, alone, or a little bit afraid, all very normal during these unprecedented times. Our nation, and indeed countries across the world face great uncertainties with constant changes to deal with.
We may not be able to plan very far into the future, we may not even know what next week will bring. But the one thing we can be absolutely certain about is, that God does not change, His care for all of us never wavers.

So, let us all share an extra bit of kindness with those around us as we make this Harvest as special as those in years gone by. Let us pass it on as the saying goes.
Now some of you may wish to take your box to the local Foodbank or Stone pillow, and that is fantastic but you may just need to check how these places would like your gift delivered.

When I read the account of creation in Genesis and get to the word’s, ‘and God saw all that he had made was very good’, I often wonder how he must feel now about what people are doing to His earth.

We don’t have to look very far, or read very much to know that there are so many tragic events happening, there are floods, fires and earthquakes. Much of humanity seems to care little about other people’s lives or the created world about them, those in power don’t seem to be able to say anything good about those in the other party, and we can all feel very helpless wondering ‘what on earth can I do’ to make a difference.

Today’s readings teach us, that we are not expected to do huge enormous things, we are not expected to change the world on our own. Rather they encourage us to understand that we can all do multiple small things well, and if we continue to work together, celebrating one another’s gifts, we will, make the world a better place.

This Covid virus can make people feel sad or depressed about all the things they cannot do, let us, with churches across the world help others celebrate all the many wonderful things that we can do. For God still cares for the world just as he did when he created all things, He stills thinks, despite all the awful things, that it is still very good. May we always see the beauty and wonder around us. Amen

Let us now ponder on the wonder of the created world, do take a look out of your window to see how amazing the smallest blade of grass really is.

This week we pray for:

Those who work on the land and sea, and all who provide our food.
Our local shops and all who work in them.
Those who are worried about losing their jobs or homes.
Our families, friends and neighbours.
Those who are unwell either at home or in hospital.
Let us now sit for another moment of stillness and quiet as we acknowledge all the blessings we receive from God.

Almighty God, you have promised to hear the prayers of those who ask in your Son’s name; we pray that what we have asked faithfully we may obtain effectively; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

The Peace of the Lord be always with you.
In our hearts let us send a message of peace to our friends and neighbours.

Notices.

Please do note the change of time for Fishbourne’s APCM, and the notice for parents who would like a church support form, sent out in the newsletter.
As Covid numbers continue to rise, please do keep safe, let us all play our part in keeping others safe, we are in this together.
I will be heading back up to Scotland to be with my Mum who has now been told she has just a few weeks to live, hopefully in the next couple of weeks or so. Be assured, services will continue in one form or another.

Let us pray:

O Lord, we thank you for the created world, help us all to really look after it, to make the right choices in all that we do so that together we can continue to make it all very good once more. The world is a glorious place, give us the grace to appreciate our food, our homes, our friends, the sunshine and the rain, and the gifts you have given to each one of us. We ask this in Jesus name. Amen.

The Blessing.

May the road rise up to meet you,
The wind be always at your back.
The sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall softly on your fields,
And, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand.

The blessing of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit be upon us, this day and always. Amen.

And so be at peace, with God, with yourself and with those around you.

Have a great week and don’t forget to keep an eye on your neighbours to make sure they are still doing ok especially as we move in to another uncertain time.

Love and prayers to you all, Moira

 
TRINITY 15

from Rev’d Canon Moira Wickens

20th September 2020

Good morning everyone, I trust that you are all well. Thank you for joining us once again.

The Lord be with you.

Almighty God, to whom all hearts are open, all desires known, and from whom no secrets are hidden;
Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit,
That we may perfectly love you, and worthily magnify your Holy Name; through Christ our Lord. Amen.

God so loved the world, that He gave His only Son Jesus Christ to save us from our sins, to be our advocate in heaven, and to bring us to eternal life.

We say sorry for those times we have forgotten how much God loves us.

Most merciful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we confess that we have sinned in thought, word and deed.
We have not loved you with our

whole heart. We have not loved our neighbours as ourselves.
In your mercy forgive what we have been, help us to amend what we are, and direct what we shall be, that we may do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with you, our God. Amen.

Almighty God, who forgives all who truly repent, have mercy upon you, pardon and deliver you from all your sins, confirm and strengthen you in all goodness, and keep you in life eternal; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

The Gloria.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to His people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
We worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.

Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the world: have mercy upon us,
You are seated at the right hand of the Father, receive our prayer.

For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
You alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
In the glory of God, the Father. Amen

The Collect Prayer. (The special weekly prayer)

Almighty God, who in generous mercy sent the Holy Spirit upon your church in the burning fire of your love, grant that your people may be fervent in the fellowship of the gospel that, always abiding in you, they may be found steadfast in faith and active in service. Through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.

Today’s Readings.

Philippians 1:21-30   (NRSV)

For to me, living is Christ and dying is gain. If I am to live in the flesh, that means fruitful labour for me; and I do not know which I prefer. I am hard pressed between the two: my desire is to depart and be with Christ, for that is far better; but to remain in the flesh is more necessary for you. Since I am convinced of this, I know that I will remain and continue with all of you for your progress and joy in faith, so that I may share abundantly in your boasting in Christ Jesus when I come to you again.
Only, live your life in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ, so that, whether I come and see you or am absent and hear about you, I will know that you are standing firm in one spirit, striving side by side with one mind for the faith of the gospel, and are in no way intimidated by your opponents. For them this is evidence of their destruction, but of your salvation. And this is God’s doing. For he has graciously granted you the privilege not only of believing in Christ, but of suffering for him as well— since you are having the same struggle that you saw I had and now hear that I still have.

Matthew 20:1-16 (NRSV)

“For the kingdom of heaven is like a landowner who went out early in the morning to hire labourers for his vineyard. After agreeing with the labourers for the usual daily wage, he sent them into his vineyard. When he went out about nine o’clock, he saw others standing idle in the marketplace; and he said to them, ‘You also go into the vineyard, and I will pay you whatever is right.’ So they went. When he went out again about noon and about three o’clock, he did the same. And about five o’clock he went out and found others standing around; and he said to them, ‘Why are you standing here idle all day?’ They said to him, ‘Because no one has hired us.’ He said to them, ‘You also go into the vineyard.’ 8 When evening came, the owner of the vineyard said to his manager, ‘Call the labourers and give them their pay, beginning with the last and then going to the first.’ When those hired about five o’clock came, each of them received the usual daily wage. Now when the first came, they thought they would receive more; but each of them also received the usual daily wage. And when they received it, they grumbled against the landowner, saying, ‘These last worked only one hour, and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the day and the scorching heat.’ But he replied to one of them, ‘Friend, I am doing you no wrong; did you not agree with me for the usual daily wage? Take what belongs to you and go; I choose to give to this last the same as I give to you. Am I not allowed to do what I choose with what belongs to me? Or are you envious because I am generous?’ So the last will be first, and the first will be last.”

Reflection for Sunday 20th September, by Jenny
                                         
What changes might Jesus want you to make to your way of thinking? That was the question posed in my daily Bible reading notes earlier this year. It seemed to me to be such a relevant question when we read Jesus’ parable about the workers in the vineyard.

We are living at a time of awakening. The “Black Lives Matter” protests challenge our thinking and ask us about our hidden prejudices. What other issues spoil our society that we never give a thought to? What changes might Jesus want us to make to our way of thinking about others inside the church and more widely?

To the people of Jesus’ day finding work would have been a familiar situation.  They lived a hand to mouth existence and life was tough. Getting work meant being able to feed your family. On this occasion it was work in a vineyard on offer. It was strenuous physical labour, made even harder as the heat of the day intensified. Think of that very hot spell we had for a few days this August. I know we felt like doing nothing except going to the beach to cool down.

In the parable the landowner went down early, probably about six o’clock, to the market place to get the labour he needed and he agreed to pay them the going rate, usually one denarius a day for a manual worker. The vineyard owner made four more trips to the marketplace, at nine, twelve, three in the afternoon and surprisingly at five, only one hour before finishing time, each time employing more workers and agreeing to pay them what was right. At the end of the day he asked his manager to pay the labourers beginning with those who’d worked for the shortest time first, the next shortest and so on. Those who had toiled the longest heard what each group were paid.

Well those who’d worked for only one hour were delighted to find their pay packet contained the rate they’d have expected for twelve hours. Can’t you feel the expectations of those who’d worked all day and through the heat of the midday sun growing? It was going to be good today! Everyone was surprised when they were paid the same amount. Those who were exhausted having worked all day were shocked and made their feelings felt. It wasn’t fair! It certainly challenges conventional values. What would trade union leaders of today make of it? When Jesus told this story, he knew we would get to this point and our sense of justice or injustice would kick in.

Remember our question, “What changes might Jesus want you to make to your way of thinking?” How does Jesus want us to live when we are members of the kingdom of God? Paul is talking about kingdom living in our first reading. He says, “Live your life in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ, so …. I will know that you are standing firm in one spirit, striving side by side with one mind for the faith of the gospel.” The changes Jesus calls us to make are to help us live in this way.
What changes in attitude was Jesus calling those who had worked the hardest and longest to make? In this context we understand the landowner to be God, himself. The first workers grumbled. Looking back in the Bible we can see how destructive grumbling was to the Israelites after God had rescued them from slavery in Egypt. It led them to wander for 40 years in the desert on their way to the Promised Land.

Jesus explained through this parable what God is like. He is incredibly generous to us. His gifts are forgiveness and life and salvation, leading to eternal life, which He offers to all who believe. These are gifts that however hard we work, we cannot earn. They are priceless gifts. We call them God’s grace. They are freely given but they cost Jesus his life.

The vineyard workers who had laboured all day were resentful and felt they should receive more. This parable is saying we are all equal in God’s sight. Moira often tells us we are all equal round the communion table. Whatever we’ve done, however we feel about ourselves, however long or short we’ve been members of the church, we are all equal and all precious. God has given us different gifts to use in his church and these too are equally valued. Some gifts are seen while others are done quietly. Some people are welcomers, some can clean well, some have green fingers, others musical fingers, others can bake – but we are all equal. You may be the newest, youngest, oldest, feel strange in church, don’t know the services, but we are all equal, no one better than another and we are all in need of God’s grace.
I
remember hearing a talk given by a prison chaplain. He spoke of his sadness when prisoners who’d given their lives to Christ were released and having gone to their local church weren’t welcomed. What would our attitude be?

Our attitudes will all be different to a range of issues in the world today – colour, refugees, homelessness, climate change…  We need to remember that God’s love is for each person we encounter or see on our television screens. Jesus died for those we understand and those we don’t.
What changes might Jesus want us to make to our way of thinking about others? This will be different for each one of us. Let us allow the Holy Spirit to challenge our attitudes to others. In the church let’s encourage each other to stand firm in our faith, let’s share each other’s joys and sorrows so we can build one another up.

May we always remember to praise God for his mercy and generosity to us and like Paul may we be able to say, “For to me, living is Christ.”

This week we pray for:

Our wardens, members of the PCC, and our treasurers as they prepare for the Annual Church Meetings.
Revd. David Hider and our Readers Jenny and John.
Our Local communities especially for families who may be struggling.
Those who are worried about losing their jobs or homes.
Our families, friends and neighbours.
Those who are unwell either at home or in hospital.
This week we offer a special prayer for Jose and Graham Pound.
Let us sit for a moment of stillness and quiet.

Almighty God, you have promised to hear the prayers of those who ask in your Son’s name; we pray that what we have asked faithfully we may obtain effectively; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

The Peace of the Lord be always with you.

Please do take a few moments now to silently give thanks for those who are able to attend our church service, do remember that they represent you all, and we hold you in our hearts as we gather together.

Notices.

Many of you will have read about the terrible house fire in Apuldram. It was Jose and Graham Pound’s home, thankfully they are both okay, and we thank God for that, but there has been horrific, widespread damage to their house. Please do keep them in your prayers as they sort out somewhere else to live, it has as you can imagine been an enormous shock to them and to their family. If they had not had a smoke alarm, which woke them at 5.00 a.m., the outcome of this fire would have been very different indeed. So please do check that yours is working.

Finally, please do note the dates and times for our Annual Church Meetings.

30th September 10.00 for Apuldram. Held in Apuldram Church.
 
4th October. 11.00 a.m. for Fishbourne, this will be held by Zoom, the link to this will be sent out soon.

In due course all reports for these meetings will be published on the websites.

Let us pray:

Keep, O Lord, your church, with your perpetual mercy; and because without you our human frailty cannot but fall, keep us ever by your help from all things hurtful, and lead us to all things profitable to our salvation, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The Blessing.

May the road rise up to meet you,
The wind be always at your back.
The sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall softly on your fields,
And, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand.

The blessing of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit be upon us, this day and always. Amen.

And so be at peace, with God, with yourself and with those around you.

Have a great week and don’t forget to keep an eye on your neighbours to make sure they are still doing ok.

 
 
TRINITY 14
from the Rev’d David Hider
 
THANK YOU for joining our weekly on-line act of worship.Let us bring to mind our personal failures to love God, his people and his Creation:
                                            [Pause]
Lord God,
we have sinned against you;
we have done evil in your sight.
We are sorry and repent.
Have mercy on us according to your love.
Wash away our wrongdoing and cleanse us from our sin.
Renew a right spirit within us
and restore us to the joy of your salvation,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.May almighty God have mercy on us,
forgive us our sins and bring us to everlasting life,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
We praise you, we sing hymns to you, we bless you, we glorify you,
we worship you by your great High Priest, alone as the true God,
the One Unbegotten, the only inaccessible Being, for your great glory,
O Lord and heavenly King, almighty God and Father.
O Lord God, the Father of Christ the immaculate Lamb,
who takes away the sin of the world, receive our prayer.
You are seated above the cherubim.
For you alone are the holy One, you alone are the Lord, Jesus Christ,
God of all created nature, our King,
to whom belongs glory, honour, and worship. Amen.
        [Source: Prayers of the Early Church, edited by J. Manning Potts, 1953]We pray the Collect (this week’s Special Prayer)Almighty God,
whose only Son has opened for us
a new and living way into your presence:
give us pure hearts and steadfast wills
to worship you in spirit and in truth;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.A Reading from the Letter of Paul to the Romans, chapter 14, verses 1 to 12Welcome those who are weak in faith, but not for the purpose of quarrelling over opinions. Some believe in eating anything, while the weak eat only vegetables. Those who eat must not despise those who abstain, and those who abstain must not pass judgment on those who eat; for God has welcomed them. Who are you to pass judgment on servants of another? It is before their own lord that they stand or fall. And they will be upheld, for the Lord is able to make them stand.Some judge one day to be better than another, while others judge all days to be alike. Let all be fully convinced in their own minds. Those who observe the day, observe it in honour of the Lord. Also those who eat, eat in honour of the Lord, since they give thanks to God; while those who abstain, abstain in honour of the Lord and give thanks to God.We do not live to ourselves, and we do not die to ourselves. If we live, we live to the Lord, and if we die, we die to the Lord; so then, whether we live or whether we die, we are the Lord’s. For to this end Christ died and lived again, so that he might be Lord of both the dead and the living.Why do you pass judgment on your brother or sister? Or you, why do you despise your brother or sister? For we will all stand before the judgment seat of God. For it is written,
“As I live, says the Lord, every knee shall bow to me,
and every tongue shall give praise to God.”
So then, each of us will be accountable to God.The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 18, verses 21 to 35Then Peter came and said to Jesus, “Lord, if another member of the church sins against me, how often should I forgive? As many as seven times?” Jesus said to him, “Not seven times, but, I tell you, seventy-seven times.For this reason the kingdom of heaven may be compared to a king who wished to settle accounts with his slaves. When he began the reckoning, one who owed him ten thousand talents was brought to him; and, as he could not pay, his lord ordered him to be sold, together with his wife and children and all his possessions, and payment to be made. So the slave fell on his knees before him, saying, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you everything.’ And out of pity for him, the lord of that slave released him and forgave him the debt. But that same slave, as he went out, came upon one of his fellow slaves who owed him a hundred denarii; and seizing him by the throat, he said, ‘Pay what you owe.’ Then his fellow slave fell down and pleaded with him, ‘Have patience with me, and I will pay you.’ But he refused; then he went and threw him into prison until he would pay the debt. When his fellow slaves saw what had happened, they were greatly distressed, and they went and reported to their lord all that had taken place. Then his lord summoned him and said to him, ‘You wicked slave! I forgave you all that debt because you pleaded with me. Should you not have had mercy on your fellow slave, as I had mercy on you?’ And in anger his lord handed him over to be tortured until he would pay his entire debt. So my heavenly Father will also do to every one of you, if you do not forgive your brother or sister from your heart.”We reflect upon today’s MessageWhen Peter raised his hypothetical question about forgiveness, he got more than he had bargained for. The short answer that Jesus gave was far from sweet – and the parable that he told to press home the point, was even less palatable. In suggesting, in theory, that he would be prepared to forgive up to seven times in the case of a brother who persisted in sinning against him, Peter was offering to do more than twice what the, then, current law required of him.So, did he really expect to be praised for his magnanimity? Just imagine how deflated he must have felt when Jesus replied that seventy-times-seven would be a more acceptable target at which to aim. The clear implication of this hyperbole was that forgiveness should be unlimited. And, if this unexpected arithmetic was not enough to challenge the smugness and self-congratulation that lay behind Peter’s question, the story of the Unforgiving Servant must surely have convinced him that his calculations were not only superficial, but entirely out of keeping with what God requires.

How, like Peter, might we be in our approach to forgiveness? Do we make it a matter of simple arithmetic, calculating how much we are prepared to take – and feel quite pleased with ourselves should we consider the possibility of going a little farther? But, when our theories are put to the test, do we all have a sticking-point beyond which we are unwilling or unable to go? In theory, we recognise that the unforgiving servant, who had been let off such a massive debt, should have found it in his heart to write off the relatively minuscule amount owed to him. But, in practice, we know that we are very much like him. We judge other people’s behaviour by far harsher standards than we apply to ourselves. We defend our own faults and failings with excuses which we would not be prepared to accept from someone else. In both theory and practice, in truth, we tend to set limits on our forgiveness of others.

A theology of forgiveness, which does not take seriously the devastating consequences of such evil behaviour of murder, rape, terrorism and the like, is clearly inadequate. Today’s Biblical texts do not avoid the question of judgement – but, they do remind us that God is the final arbiter in such matters. God’s ability to make right judgements – God’s capacity to forgive – cannot be contained or conformed within our fallible notion of what is right or fair. All of us, whether we consider our sins to be great or small, will be required to give an account to God at the end of our lives. Pleading that others have done far worse than we have done will not let us off the hook. And, the way in which we have judged others will be taken into the reckoning.  As Jesus said: “This is how my heavenly Father will also do to every one of you, if you do not forgive your brother or sister from your heart.” Although Peter’s question was broader than family issues, we all know that it is in the context of our closest relationships that our capacity to offer unlimited forgiveness is put to its greatest test. Could we forgive one of our parents, or our spouse, if we found out that they had been having an affair? What if our brothers or sisters were jealous of us and had plotted to do away with us – would we be able to forgive them, particularly if the tables were turned and we had it in our power to take revenge?

Our humanity shows that we only confess our little faults (sins) to persuade people that we have no big ones. And, likewise, it also says that forgiveness is a lovely idea until we have something to forgive. So, then, how far should forgiveness go? Perhaps, at least, we should consider the following:  
    Beyond false comparisons, which can delude us into thinking that we deserve better because others have committed worse sins than our own.   
    Beyond stubborn self-pride, that prevents us from making the first move even when we know that there are faults on both sides.  
    Beyond pious theory to painful practice.  
    Beyond the simple arithmetic of calculating how much we are prepared to give or take, to a humble and honest acceptance of the sum total of all that we have received from God.  “As far as the east is from the west, so far does he remove our sins from us.” (Psalm 103:12)

So, when it comes to real forgiveness, only God knows how far each one of us has to go. But, Jesus calls us to keep on going. He tells us of the danger of an unforgiving heart. He points us in the right direction however many times we wander astray and he walks with us every step of the way. So, we would do well to remember that forgiving is a natural result of loving and, therefore, it is not an option for us, but a command. And, to remind us, we pray in the Lord’s Prayer : ‘Forgive us …. as we forgive.’

A Christian Creed

Let us affirm our faith in Jesus Christ, the Son of God.        [Pause]

Though he was divine,
he did not cling to equality with God, but made himself nothing.
Taking the form of a slave, he was born in human likeness.
He humbled himself and was obedient to death, even the death of the cross.
Therefore God has raised him on high, and given him the name above every name:
that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow,
and every voice proclaim that Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father. Amen.                 [c.f. Philippians 2.6-11]

A suggestion for your Prayers
Gracious God, fountain of all wisdom, we pray for all Christian people;
for our Bishops, Martin, Ruth and William,
for all Christian leaders especially our Rector, Moira, and the Churchwardens,
and for those who teach and guard the faith, including our Readers, John and Jenny.
May the word of Christ dwell richly in our hearts,
and knit us together in the bond of your love.

We pray for the leaders of the nations, including those within the United Kingdom,
and for those in authority under them,
especially any dealing with the many issues following the coronavirus pandemic.
Give them the gift of your wisdom and a right discernment in all things.

We pray for the villages of Fishbourne and Apuldram and their communities;
for those who live and work in them, and for those who visit these places.
Speak your word of peace in our midst,
and help us to serve one another as Christ has served us.

We pray for those who do not believe,
and yet who long to know you, the very Word of life.
Open their ears to hear your voice,
and open their hearts to the knowledge of your love in Christ.

We pray for those bowed down with grief, fear, sickness or the failure to forgive.
We pray for all who are struggling with the ever-changing restrictions of Covid-19, especially young folk who are finding the return to school difficult or worrying.
May your living Word bring comfort and healing to all in need.

We give thanks for all those who have died in the faith of Christ
and we rejoice with all your saints, trusting in the promise of your Word fulfilled.

Lord of life, hear our prayer, and make us one in heart and mind
to serve you with joy for ever. Amen.

We pray in the words that Jesus taught his first disciples:

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

God of all grace,
we pray that as we daily seek and receive your full and free forgiveness of our sins,
so may we as fully and freely forgive those who do us wrong;
and may we offer our forgiveness, even as you grant us yours,
for the sake of Jesus Christ our Saviour. Amen.

Lord God, the source of truth and love,
keep us faithful to the apostles’ teaching and fellowship,
united in prayer and the breaking of bread,
and one in joy and simplicity of heart,
in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Merciful God,
your Son came to save us
and bore our sins on the cross:
may we trust in your mercy
and know your love,
rejoicing in the righteousness
that is ours through Jesus Christ our Lord;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

 
TRINITY 13.

6th September 2020

Good morning everyone, I trust that you are all well. Thank you for joining us once again.

The Lord be with you.

Almighty God, to whom all hearts are open, all desires known, and from whom no secrets are hidden;
Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit,
That we may perfectly love you, and worthily magnify your Holy Name; through Christ our Lord. Amen.

God so loved the world, that He gave His only Son Jesus Christ to save us from our sins, to be our advocate in heaven, and to bring us to eternal life.

We say sorry for those times we have forgotten how much God loves us.

Most merciful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we confess that we have sinned in thought, word and deed.

We have not loved you with our whole heart. We have not loved our neighbours as ourselves.
In your mercy forgive what we have been, help us to amend what we are, and direct what we shall be, that we may do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with you, our God. Amen.

Almighty God, who forgives all who truly repent, have mercy upon you, pardon and deliver you from all your sins, confirm and strengthen you in all goodness, and keep you in life eternal; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

The Gloria.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to His people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
We worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.

Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the world: have mercy upon us,
You are seated at the right hand of the Father, receive our prayer.

For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
You alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
In the glory of God, the Father. Amen

The Collect Prayer. (The special weekly prayer)

Almighty God, who called your church to bear witness that you were in Christ reconciling the world to yourself, help us to proclaim the Good News of your love, that all who hear it may be drawn to you; through him who was lifted up on the cross, and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.

Romans 13, 8-End
Matthew 18, 15-20

Reflection for Sunday 6th September

For Several weeks now, since Trinity, we have been delving into Matthew for our Gospel Reading.  Among other things, Matthew presents Jesus as a great teacher, having the authority to interpret the law of God and who teaches persuasively and repeatedly about God’s kingdom.  This week we reach chapter 18, which concentrates on the meaning of discipleship and our personal relationships with other individuals.  It’s important to remember his contemporary readers were expecting a majestic messiah who would be able to free them from Roman domination so what he says on this subject would have been particularly important (and perhaps a bit disappointing!!).  Adjusting people’s view of what God incarnate would seek to achieve was paramount to Matthew.  It definitely was not about solving short term issues like land occupation and brutal regimes, which were perhaps the problems uppermost in the minds of his audience. In difficult times like ours people often ask why God let’s all this happen.  Perhaps the messages about how different Gods priorities are from ours, are very relevant.   

So, back to our gospel, Jesus piles right in.  God’s kingdom operates by totally different standards from the worlds.  Status seeking is out and so is any thought of “weakest to the wall”.  On the contrary, humility is important and the weak are the responsibility of their stronger neighbours.  When people do wrong every effort must be made to set the defaulter right.  Unlimited forgiveness is to be expected.  

In our reading from Romans, Paul deals with a related theme.   He talks of the commandments with which his contemporaries would be familiar as they are from Exodus 20.  He sums them all up in the familiar request, Love they neighbour as thyself.    Doing this means all the other commandments are covered and one can have confidence in one’s relationship with God.

If all of this is a bit daunting then perhaps ending with the conclusion to the gospel reading is appropriate.  Verse 20 contains the familiar statement, “when two or three come together in my name, I am there with them.”  A reassuring and clear statement from Jesus, to be kept in mind as our thoughts turn to the “new normal” congregational worship both our churches are starting this week.

Keep safe and God Bless, from John

This week we pray for:

Our wardens, members of the PCC, and our treasurers.
For those who will be married this month.
For all teachers, young people and parents who may feel anxious at this time.
Our Local communities especially for families who may be struggling.
Those who are worried about losing their jobs or homes.
Our families, friends and neighbours.
Those who are unwell either at home or in hospital.
The families of Myrra Melling and Betty Stevens as they prepare for their funerals which will be held in the next two weeks.
Let us sit for a moment of stillness and quiet.

Almighty God, you have promised to hear the prayers of those who ask in your Son’s name; we pray that what we have asked faithfully we may obtain effectively; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

The Blessing.

May the road rise up to meet you,
The wind be always at your back.
The sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall softly on your fields,
And, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand.

The blessing of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit be upon us, this day and always. Amen.

And so be at peace, with God, with yourself and with those around you.

Have a great week and don’t forget to keep an eye on your neighbours to make sure they are still doing ok.
 

TRINITY 12

From Rev’d Canon Moira Wickens

Good morning everyone, I trust that you are all well. Thank you for joining us once again.The Lord be with you.

Almighty God, to whom all hearts are open, all desires known, and from whom no secrets are hidden;
Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit,
That we may perfectly love you, and worthily magnify your Holy Name; through Christ our Lord. Amen.

God so loved the world, that He gave His only Son Jesus Christ to save us from our sins, to be our advocate in heaven, and to bring us to eternal life.

We say sorry for those times we have forgotten how much God loves us.

Most merciful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we confess that we have sinned in thought, word and deed.

We have not loved you with our whole heart. We have not loved our neighbours as ourselves.
In your mercy forgive what we have been, help us to amend what we are, and direct what we shall be, that we may do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with you, our God. Amen.

Almighty God, who forgives all who truly repent, have mercy upon you, pardon and deliver you from all your sins, confirm and strengthen you in all goodness, and keep you in life eternal; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

The Gloria.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to His people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
We worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.

Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the world: have mercy upon us,
You are seated at the right hand of the Father, receive our prayer.

For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
You alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
In the glory of God, the Father. Amen

The Collect Prayer.

Almighty and everlasting God, you are always more ready to hear than we to pray and to give more than either we desire or deserve. Pour down upon us the abundance of your mercy, forgiving us those things of which our conscience is afraid, and giving us those good things which we are not worthy to ask, but through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ, your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.

Today’s Readings

Romans 12. V9-end
Matthew 16. V21-end

Reflection for Sunday 30th August

Jesus asked, ‘who do you say I am, Peter as we know answered correctly and was told he would be the rock on which the church would be built.
A short time later, Jesus explained that he would suffer death on a cross.
Peter jumped in with the response, ‘oh no, I won’t let that happen.

Oh dear, how could one man get things so right one moment, and then so terribly wrong the next. This week’s gospel reading follows on from last weeks when we heard how Peter was told he would be the ROCK on which Jesus would build his church. A position given because it had been Peter who proclaimed that Jesus was the Messiah, the Son of God. But this week we read of him getting a right telling off for getting things so wrong.

When Jesus told his disciples that he was to suffer death on the cross, there is no doubt that they would have been very shocked and upset by this thought. After all, he was their friend, so why would God send someone to save the world just let that person die such an undignified death, that can’t be right. Surely things could be sorted out in a different way, on the battlefield, with Jesus leading the troops. We can imagine the disciple’s confusion and upset, so it is understandable that Peter would not want it to be as Jesus said. For he obviously took seriously the role Jesus had given him, he was to be the rock, the protector,  therefore he believed that he had a responsibility to make sure that Jesus’ ministry was successful by his way of thinking, surely it was, wasn’t it, his duty to put Jesus in his place.

And it is here that we discover a deep aspect of human nature, a way of thinking that we all do at times. For  we too respond to people and situations in exactly the same way as Peter did to what Jesus told them, we simple do not want our friends to suffer any more than Peter wanted Jesus to.
Ultimately, Peter’s mistake, and ours when we do the same, was to allow his own desires, his own assumptions and interests to direct his thinking.
But Jesus wasted no time in setting him straight, reminding him that he was to follow behind, not try to be in front, we may even feel sorry for Peter at the way Jesus spoke to Him. It sounds pretty cruel. But actually, all he was doing was to remind Peter, not to be led by the way of the world, not to allow his own hopes to direct his thinking, but to put Christ first, to follow, not to try to do things his way, but to remember to do things God’s way.

And that my dear friends is without doubt a very tough way to live. How easy it is for us all to try to make things better for those around us, none of us wants to see another person go through a tough time.  

We too want to make life easier for those we know and love, but in doing so we so often make exactly the same mistake as Peter did all those years ago.

To take up our cross daily and to follow Christ, and to enable others to do the same, means that bit by bit we have to let go of ourselves, time and time again, it is not a once only act, but takes a life time.

As David said last week, ‘it is not enough to know about Jesus, we need to have an ever-developing relationship with Him’.  This relationship grows through prayer, through the reading of scripture and even by those moments when we realise, we got it wrong.

We take up our cross every time we suffer in some way for identifying with Jesus and respond to His call on our lives. Now this does not necessarily mean that our lives will be full of infliction or persecution, it simply means denying what we deeply desire in order to do the will of God, and when we get it right, we position ourselves for great blessing.

In our little corner of the world, our persecutions may not be too severe, it may simply be in the form of being rejected or laughed at by friends or family when we say we believe in God. There are in fact many people who are afraid to admit to that, for fear of what others might say or do. Afterall, it may affect their work lives, their friendships and close relationships, but we must always strive to have the courage to take up our cross and follow Christ.

For that is the only way that leads to freedom and Life. Let us be assured that we will never carry our cross on our own, we are not asked to do that, all we are asked to do is to take it up, every moment of every day, Christ will help us carry it.

The world needs the challenge of the cross as much today as in the time of Peter, If only world leaders, politicians and all those who hold a position of authority over others, would let go of their own wants and desires, their own way of thinking of how things should be, and let God direct their thinking and the decisions they make.

And perhaps, during this time of lockdown, we have all been able to reflect on what is really important in life, and what we truly need rather than what we want.

Peter’s story reminds us all, that it is not one incident, one moment of getting it right alone that makes a life, and it is ok to make mistakes.

Though we might fall again and again, it is actually the getting back up that marks us as true children of God.

Ultimately, Peter reveals to us, what it is to be human, and how a relationship with Jesus takes time, in fact it takes a lifetime and even then we will not understand completely the amazing works of God. Amen.

This week we pray for:

Our local schools as they prepare for the start of the new term.
Especially those who are starting for the very first time.
For all teachers, young people and parents who may feel anxious at this time.
Our Local communities.
Those who are worried about losing their jobs or homes.
Our families, friends and neighbours.
Those who are unwell.
The family of Joan Scrivens as they prepare for her funeral on Wednesday.

Almighty God, you have promised to hear the prayers of those who ask in your Son’s name; we pray that what we have asked faithfully we may obtain effectively; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

Notices:

We gave Alan Frost a little gift on behalf of us all, just to say thank you for all the work he has done during these last months, to keep us in touch with one another, and to enable us to continue with our worship albeit in a different way. Please do share your news on the website by sending it through to him, it is lovely to see and hear what you are getting up to.

The Blessing.

May the road rise up to meet you,
The wind be always at your back.
The sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall softly on your fields,
And, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand.

The blessing of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit be upon us, this day and always. Amen.

And so be at peace, with God, with yourself and with those around you.

Trinity 11
From the Rev’d David Hider.

Although, for some, return to attending a Service in Church restarts today; for others, this may not be possible yet. Please pray for Moira and the churchwardens who have the responsibility for ensuring the safety of those attending the Services in a world where ‘the rules’ are ever-changing.
Our weekly on-line act of worship will continue for the time being. Thank you for joining us here.

Let us bring to mind our personal failures to love God, his people and his Creation:

Almighty God, long-suffering and of great goodness:
We confess with whole hearts
our neglect and forgetfulness of your commandments,
our wrong doing, thinking, and speaking;
the hurts we have done to others,
and the good we have left undone.
O God, forgive us, for we have sinned against you;
and raise us to newness of life;

through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

May almighty God have mercy on us,
forgive us our sins and bring us to everlasting life,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

We pray the Collect (this week’s Special Prayer)
O God, you declare your almighty power
most chiefly in showing mercy and pity:
mercifully grant to us such a measure of your grace,
that we, running the way of your commandments,
may receive your gracious promises,
and be made partakers of your heavenly treasure;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the Letter of Paul to the Romans, chapter 12, verses 1 to 8
I appeal to you therefore, brothers and sisters, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship. Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your minds, so that you may discern what is the will of God – what is good and acceptable and perfect.

For by the grace given to me I say to everyone among you not to think of yourself more highly than you ought to think, but to think with sober judgment, each according to the measure of faith that God has assigned. For as in one body we have many members, and not all the members have the same function, so we, who are many, are one body in Christ, and individually we are members one of another. We have gifts that differ according to the grace given to us: prophecy, in proportion to faith; ministry, in ministering; the teacher, in teaching; the exhorter, in exhortation; the giver, in generosity; the leader, in diligence; the compassionate, in cheerfulness.

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 16, verses 13 to 20
Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, but others Elijah, and still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.” And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.” Then he sternly ordered the disciples not to tell anyone that he was the Messiah.

We reflect upon today’s Message
“Who do you say that I am?” is a question that still sends shivers down my spine. It revives memories of a particular school bully who would thrust his face into mine (and others) and snarl those very words. Give him an answer that did not pander to his sense of self-importance would mean a thrashing from him and his cohorts who were always present in the background. It was usually painful. I can still feel myself recoiling. Moving on to today, that question also reflects one of the issues that afflicts many a man or woman in this modern age. “Who do you say that I am?” Or, as it is usually expressed: “How do you/others see me?” Our media channels are stuffed with person after person trying to project the right image for himself/herself in order to pursue a career in the public domain. And, I suspect that there are times for many of us when we feel that we just have to project a particular image of ourselves in order to gain attention. In simple terms, to get the image right can bring success; to get it wrong can mean disaster and that can be painful.   

So, it is interesting to find, in our first-century Gospel text, Jesus asking how people perceive him: “Who do you say that I am?” A number of answers come. Elijah, John the Baptist, Jeremiah, or another of the prophets. All these, like Jesus, were people who came to bring a message. They each provided a turning point in the Jewish nation’s understanding of themselves and their God. The reactions to them were various – suspicion, hope, threat, bewilderment – and all of these are a real parallel to Jesus. But, is Jesus more than this? ‘But who do you say I am?’ he asks. Peter replies: ‘You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God?’ It is not enough to know about Jesus, we need to know him; to have a relationship with him.

Peter sees more than just a projection of personality. Jesus is the saving presence of God himself. This is not just an announcement and a message. It is a redeeming and re-creating power. And, as we know with the benefit of hindsight, Peter is going to find this hard to hold on to. When Jesus says that his declaration will mean suffering and death, Peter loses it again. Later, when the shame of Jesus’ death – and the fear of his own – comes, he denies, not just his insight, but also his relationship with Jesus. But, Peter’s intuitive grasp of the truth does prevail in the end – and he does become what Jesus promised, a Rock. The Rock was that he saw that God had come into the world and he could witness to the transformation that became possible as a result. Yet, there were others who could see the same Jesus, who could endure the same experiences, but could hear only a message, a report. But, Peter would say: “Here is the loving salvation of God himself.”

So, we turn to the text from St Paul’s Letter to the Roman Church. It is mainly urging the fellowship to have the highest aims and standards in their personal lives and in their life together as a Church. A quick reading of it might suggest that Paul has put aside all he had said earlier about being unable to reach a good and acceptable life by our own efforts. It can be read as a piece of moralising. But, there is one crucial sentence which suggests that this is not so: “Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your minds.” In other words, our feelings, our actions, our judgements and our perceptions are not to be moulded by what our present culture says. They are all to be transformed, changed. All that St Paul has written about Christ means that we can be changed.

Yes, we can see things differently. And, what we can be and what we can do is a gift. It is not something to become puffed up about. We know that Peter saw that Jesus was more than someone who gave a message from God, however powerful and significant that message might be. Peter knew that Jesus was God bringing salvation and life. In the same way, St Paul sees Jesus as so much more than an example, or a pointer to how we should live. Jesus was the power to transform us, to lift us out of the mind-set of the world in which we live and to make us saints (small ‘s’, at this stage).

Thankfully, our path to goodness and joy is not a lifelong grind in our own strength. It is a gift for us to see, and to accept, and to trust. It remains there through all hardships and disappointments. It is still there when we fail and when we stray.  It comes to us as a gift from the rock from which are hewn. It is from the quarry from which we were dug.

So, what of ourselves? How do we see ourselves? Perhaps we have glimpsed the truth, like Peter, and lost it again. But, it remains there for us. It remains there for us in the truth of our origins, in the presence with us of a suffering and saving God, and in the possibility of reaching beyond the earth-bound perceptions of our age to see the truth with transformed minds. And, so it is that Jesus says to each one of us, again, this morning: “But, YOU – who do YOU say that I am?” The question provides a choice which, in turn, provides our answer: Do we see just another prophet with a message? Or, do we see God-in-Jesus bringing salvation and life? The Christian faith is not so much about belief, but about a living relationship with Jesus.

A suggestion for your Prayers

In a world where there are an ever-growing number of acts of injustice and failing, please bring before God the personal petitions that are in your mind and on your heart, asking him to guide your response before saying the following:

Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.
Where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
where there is sadness, joy.

O Divine Master,
grant that I may not so much seek
to be consoled as to console,
to be understood as to understand,
to be loved as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive,
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned,
and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life. Amen.

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Lord of all mercy,
we your faithful people have celebrated that one true sacrifice
which takes away our sins and brings pardon and peace:
by our communion keep us firm on the foundation of the gospel
and preserve us from all sin; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

God of glory,
the end of our searching,
help us to lay aside all that prevents us from seeking your kingdom,
and to give all that we have to gain the pearl beyond all price,
through our Saviour Jesus Christ;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

CONGRATULATIONS!
To all who have received their examination grades over these past few days. Whatever these were, we hope that your next step in life is both productive and happy.

 

TRINITY 10

From Rev’d Canon Moira Wickens (16th August 2020).

Good morning everyone, thank you so much for joining us. I trust that you are all keeping well and safe.

The Lord be with you.
Almighty God, to whom all hearts be open, all desires known, and from whom no secrets are hidden; cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspirations of your Holy Spirit, that we may perfectly love you, and worthily magnify your Holy name; through Christ our Lord, Amen.

We say sorry to God, for those times when we have failed to see His presence with us.

Most merciful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we confess that we have sinned in thought, in word and in deed. We have not loved You with our whole heart, we have not loved our neighbours as ourselves. In your mercy forgive what we have been, help us to amend what we are, and direct what we shall be, that we may do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with you, our God. Amen.

Almighty God, who forgives all who truly repent, have mercy upon us, pardon and deliver us from all our sins, confirm and strengthen us in all goodness, and keep us in life eternal, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The Gloria.  (shortened version).
Glory to God in the highest, and peace to His people on earth,
Lord God heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
We worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.

The collect Prayer.
Almighty God, who looked upon the lowliness of the Blessed Virgin Mary and chose her to be the mother of your only Son: grant that we who are redeemed by His blood may share with her in the glory of your eternal kingdom; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.

Today’s readings.

Galatians 4:4-7     (NRSV)
But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, in order to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as children. And because you are children, God has sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, “Abba! Father!” So you are no longer a slave but a child, and if a child then also an heir, through God.

Luke 1:46-55   (NRSV)
Mary’s Song of Praise
And Mary said,
“My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Saviour, 48 for he has looked with favour on the lowliness of his servant. Surely, from now on all generations will call me blessed; 49 for the Mighty One has done great things for me, and holy is his name. His mercy is for those who fear him from generation to generation. He has shown strength with his arm; he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts. He has brought down the powerful from their thrones, and lifted up the lowly; he has filled the hungry with good things, and sent the rich away empty. He has helped his servant Israel, in remembrance of his mercy, 55 according to the promise he made to our ancestors, to Abraham and to his descendants forever.”

Reflection written by Jenny

August 15th is the day in the church’s year when Christians celebrate the life and work of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Our readings for today help us to understand why she is one very special lady.

Our Gospel reading is known as Mary’s song and also as the Magnificat. Whereabouts in Luke’s birth narrative does Mary’s song come?

Mary had been visited by the angel Gabriel. Gabriel had brought the astounding news that Mary would give birth to a son, not Joseph’s child, but the Son of God. When Mary had asked how could this impossible thing happen, the angel had told her about her cousin Elizabeth, who although past child bearing age was also going to have a baby. Two miracles of immense significance. Mary made that journey to the hill country to visit Elizabeth and find out more.

Elizabeth was Mary’s cousin. She was married to a priest, Zechariah. They had longed for a child but Elizabeth was well past child bearing age. It had been Zechariah’s turn to offer incense out of sight in an inner court of the Temple and there the angel Gabriel appeared to him and told him that he and Elizabeth would have a child who would prepare the way for the Lord’s coming. This was the one we know as John the Baptist who played his part in the fulfilling of God’s promises in the Old Testament.

All the excitement and joy of the moment Mary arrives at Elizabeth’s house is captured in the Bible. They were just overjoyed to see each other, so different in age but their unexpected pregnancies bringing them even closer together. When Mary called out to say she had arrived, the Scriptures say Elizabeth felt the baby leap in her womb. Elizabeth herself was filled with the Holy Spirit and prayed a blessing on Mary. Mary responded with our reading.
What can we learn from Mary and this beautiful song?
Mary put God first in her life. She knew the joy of being obedient. God had called her to be the mother of the Lord Jesus and she said yes to God. Do we make time to listen to God so we can hear what he might be asking us to do? For Mary it would also bring great pain and sadness, but she was so willing to be his servant. God has a purpose for each one of us. What God wants us to do often comes to us as a thought that prompts us to action. May we each day be those who by what we do and say bring God’s love to our families, neighbours and friends.
Mary’s song glorified God for what he was going to do for the world through the birth of her Son. Mary gave praise to God. Do we praise God? Do we say thank you to him for all the blessings in our lives? I find there are many things I want to talk to God about but I don’t always remember to praise him, especially if life is full of problems and worries! Where did Mary find the inspiration for her song of praise? Mary’ song is an echo of Hannah’s prayer in 1 Samuel 2:1-10 whose story would have been well known to Mary. We too can use the Scriptures to help us express our praise. There we can find inspiration. Reading a psalm of praise is a lovely way of beginning a time of prayer with God. Psalm 103 has been a favourite of mine in the last few months.
Almost all the words and ideas in Mary’s song are from the Old Testament scriptures. Mary and Elizabeth came from devout Jewish families. They looked forward to the day when God would send the Messiah He had promised. Mary trusted that God would one day do what he had said. The Magnificat has been called the most revolutionary document in the world. Jesus came to turn the world’s values upside down and fill the spiritually hungry. Mary realised that at that moment in history God was doing something new and radical.
St Paul, in our first reading, put it like this,  “But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman,……  in order to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as children.”

Although Paul wrote those words two thousand years ago God still calls us to trust Him as His children. God still sends his Holy Spirit into our lives. Mary welcomed the Spirit into her life. We too need to allow God to fill us with the Holy Spirit, to inspire us, to help us to understand the Scriptures, to help us praise and thank Him and like Mary to put our whole trust in Him.

This week, let us pray for.

All those young people who have received their exam results, and for those who await theirs. Especially we pray for those who feel enormous disappointment, but let us also rejoice with those who have done really well.
We pray for their parents.
For all schools as they prepare to reopen in September.
Those who are facing redundancy.
Those who are unwell, lonely or afraid.
And those who have recently died.
Finally, let us each give thanks to God for His amazing blessings on our lives.

Almighty God,  you have promised to hear the prayers of those who ask in your son’s name, we pray that what we have asked faithfully, we may obtain effectively, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Notices:

Don’t forget, our trial Sunday services on the 23rd and 30th August, 9.30 at Fishbourne. Numbers will be limited so please book on line if you are able to, there will be a few places reserved for those who cannot do this. All the details are now on the website including a list of all fortchcoming services for both Fishbourne and Apuldram. You will be required to wear a mask, so let’s see how many different designs there are around. If any of you are free on Wednesday at 6.30 p.m. please do come to the church, armed with a duster and polish so that we can make sure the spiders have not taken over.

Update on my Mum: Thank you for your thoughts and prayers for my Mum and Dad, my Mum’s cancer is very advanced, but she is in good spirits. We have managed to sort out all the practical things and ensure that she has a great support network around her. I have to say it has been a good learning curve for me to be on the other side of organising a funeral, so I hope I have learnt something more. It may be that I will have to go back to Scotland at short notice, so please do be patient with me.

The Blessing.

May the road rise up to meet you, the wind be always at your back.
The sun shine warm upon your face, the rains fall softly on your fields,
And, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand.
And the blessing of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit be upon us this day and always. Amen.

Be at peace with God, with yourself, and with those around you.

TRINITY 9

from Rev’d David Hider (Sunday 9th August)

We trust that you are keeping well and expectantly awaiting our return to Church life.
We thank you, in the meantime, for joining with us in this short on-line act of worship.

Let us first pause to admit to God the sin which always confronts us, before saying:

Lord our God, in our sin we have avoided your call.
Our love for you is like a morning cloud, like the dew that goes away early.
Have mercy on us; deliver us from judgement; bind up our wounds and revive us;
in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

May the Father of all mercies cleanse us from our sins, and restore us in his image
to the praise and glory of his name, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

[You might like to sing the following version of the Gloria to the tune ‘Jesus is Lord!’]
Glory to God and peace for all his people;
we worship you, give thanks so true, honour and praise.
Glory to God in Jesus, Son and Saviour:
you take away our sin and for mercy we pray.
Glory to God! Glory to God!
Peace from the highest heaven: sing glory to God!

Glory to God whose majesty and mercy
seen in the Son, love’s holy one, Jesus the Lord.
Glory to God for Jesus Christ our Saviour
who with the Holy Spirit and Father is one.
Glory to God! Glory to God!
Peace from the highest heaven: sing glory to God!

Glory to God the hope of every people;
Give us that light in human sight, Spirit and truth.
Glory to God whose love in Jesus risen
takes every life and moment to heaven above!
Glory to God! Glory to God!
Peace from the highest heaven: sing glory to God!

We pray the Collect (this week’s Special Prayer)
Almighty God, who sent your Holy Spirit to be the life and light of your Church:
open our hearts to the riches of your grace,
that we may bring forth the fruit of the Spirit in love and joy and peace;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the Letter of Paul to the Romans, chapter 10, verses 5 to 15
Moses writes concerning the righteousness that comes from the law, that “the person who does these things will live by them.” But the righteousness that comes from faith says, “Do not say in your heart, ‘Who will ascend into heaven?’” (that is, to bring Christ down) “or ‘Who will descend into the abyss?’” (that is, to bring Christ up from the dead). But what does it say?
“The word is near you, on your lips and in your heart”
(that is, the word of faith that we proclaim); because if you confess with your lips that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved. For one believes with the heart and so is justified, and one confesses with the mouth and so is saved. The scripture says, “No one who believes in him will be put to shame.” For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all and is generous to all who call on him. For, “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

But how are they to call on one in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in one of whom they have never heard? And how are they to hear without someone to proclaim him? And how are they to proclaim him unless they are sent? As it is written, “How beautiful are the feet of those who bring good news!”

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 14, verses 22 to 33
Immediately after feeding the crowd with the five loaves and two fish, Jesus made the disciples get into the boat and go on ahead to the other side, while he dismissed the crowds. And after he had dismissed the crowds, he went up the mountain by himself to pray. When evening came, he was there alone, but by this time the boat, battered by the waves, was far from the land, for the wind was against them. And early in the morning he came walking toward them on the sea. But when the disciples saw him walking on the sea, they were terrified, saying, “It is a ghost!” And they cried out in fear. But immediately Jesus spoke to them and said, “Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid.”

Peter answered him, “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.” He said, “Come.” So Peter got out of the boat, started walking on the water, and came toward Jesus. But when he noticed the strong wind, he became frightened, and beginning to sink, he cried out, “Lord, save me!” Jesus immediately reached out his hand and caught him, saying to him, “You of little faith, why did you doubt?” When they got into the boat, the wind ceased. And those in the boat worshiped him, saying, “Truly you are the Son of God.”

We reflect upon today’s Message
Surely, there can be no mistaking it! The story of Jesus walking on the water is presented in Matthew’s Gospel as a clear sign that Jesus is the Son of God. In Hebrew thought, it was God, alone, who had destroyed the chaos monster and kept the deep in check. It was God, alone, who controlled the wind and the weather. Hence, any person, who could subdue wind and wave – and also walk on water – must have a special relationship to God. Indeed, he can only be the Son of God! Yet, for many people today, this same story is a difficult one, as our superior education gives us scientific explanations about weather conditions and wind. Plus, we are even more sceptical of stories of people walking on water for which we would want to find some logical explanation about under-sea sandbanks or rocky ridges. Yet, to take this route is probably a mistaken approach. The point of this story lies, not in the miraculous occurrence, but in the deep meaning of the sign and the underlying rich imagery that it portrays.

In Matthew’s Gospel, the setting of the story follows the miracle of the feeding of the five thousand – a story of meeting physical need which also pointed, in a deep way, to the Eucharist, the eternal heavenly banquet and the point of life for all people. Those who were fed were thrilled by having their physical needs met and, at the time, probably thought little of the spiritual significance. Jesus was troubled by this and went off to pray – having, first, sent his disciples away in a boat to go back to the other side of the lake. As the disciples went, a huge storm blew up and their boat was battered by wind and wave. Jesus came to them and told them not to be afraid.

As ever, Peter, the impetuous, got out of the boat to walk to him – but, as soon as he noticed the strong wind, he lost his nerve and began to sink. This reminds me of an old, old story (and told in an ‘And, finally,…’ some years ago!).
“A bishop, a priest, and a reader were fishing from a rowing boat in the middle of a lake. All morning they had been there and not one of them had caught anything. Then, the priest stands up and says that he needs to go to the toilet. So, he climbs out of the side of the boat and ‘walks on the water’ to shore. He comes back, ten minutes later, the same way. Then, the reader decides that he, too, needs to go to the toilet. So, he climbs out of the same side of the boat and ‘walks on the water’ to shore. He, also, comes back the same way, ten minutes later. The bishop looks at both of them and decides that his faith is just as strong as his fishing buddies and that he can also walk on water. So, he stands up, excuses himself and, as he steps out over the rear of the boat, makes a big splash and sinks down into the water. The priest looks at the reader and says: ‘I suppose we should have told him that the poles across the lake, which he was whinging about as spoiling its appearance, were actually marking where the stepping-stones were!’” [Pause for tittering!]

Anyway, back to the story where we find Peter being suddenly overwhelmed by the sense of his vulnerability – as it dawned on him that he is out in the middle of a huge stretch of dark and angry water, buffeted by the violent wind, and with nothing under his feet except fathoms of dark, cold water. It would be hard to imagine a less secure environment! So, how had he got into this precarious and vulnerable place? Simply, by responding to Jesus’ calling. How vividly this matches the experience of many Christians – responding in joy and enthusiasm to the call of Jesus to trust him and come to him, only to be thrown completely at the realisation of where this places them. So, in this situation, what do we do? Well, one thing we could do is to stop looking inwards – to stop thinking about money, wealth and self well-being – and, instead, hold on to our faith by looking outwards.  
    We must hold on to our basic belief in Jesus, crucified with his crown of thorns, risen from the dead and raised to heaven.
    We must declare our faith in Jesus, both in the way we live our lives and through our words – so that the sound may continue to go out to the ends of the earth and all people of all nations may come to the joy of the Gospel.
    We must try to stop sinking in the waves of our fears and our insecurities and cling on to our whatever we remember of God’s love for us.  
    We must look outwards to those who may claim that they do not need God but, maybe, have a secret longing for him.  
These are not just fine phrases and pious platitudes. These are the very heart of our Christian calling. As he did to Peter and the early Church long ago so, Jesus still calls out to us today: ‘You of little faith, why do you doubt? Take heart, it is I; do not be afraid.’

Now, it is all very well, you might say, that, like Peter, we need only to fix our gaze and concentration on Jesus for everything to be fine. But, the truth that we are shown in today’s reading is that there will be moments when we are made desperately aware of our vulnerability. The moment that we take the decision to climb out of our neatly-constructed lives and follow Jesus, we open ourselves up to an environment where Christ is our only – and total – security. The truth of our existence is that we are out on deep water without a boat – and, it is only at the moment of this realisation that we begin to learn what faith is all about. But, thankfully, Jesus is always there to grasp us firmly in our lack of faith – to hold onto our outstretched hands, if you like – and to bring us back to where we feel safe. It is a lifetime learning process – and, we progress at a pace that God knows we can manage. If we compare Peter’s performance here with the Peter who, later, boldly proclaims the Gospel in spite of being insulted and thrown into prison (Acts 12), we can see his dramatic growth in faith. So, let us be encouraged.  

For us, today, the environment in which we live, work and play is no less stormy or insecure than it was for Peter in the incident reported in this morning’s Gospel text. Covid-19 has had – and is continuing to have – an effect on us all, irrespective of whether we caught it or not! But, thankfully, the experience is matched by the working knowledge that same total dependence on the faithful God is all the security that we ever need. ‘Take heart, it is I,’ says Jesus, ‘do not be afraid.’ I hope for you all that is a positive message to carry forward into the week!

Please consider using these suggestions in your Prayers
Let us by prayer and intercession with thanksgiving make our requests to God.

Gracious God,
we pray for peace, justice and reconciliation throughout the world.
We pray for the honouring of human rights, and for the relief of the oppressed.
We give thanks for all that is gracious in the lives of men, women and children.

We pray for the renewal of the Church in faith, love and service.
We pray for Bishop Martin, for Moira and for the life of these parishes.
We give thanks for the gift of your word, the grace of the sacraments
and the fellowship of your people.

We pray for our Government, for wisdom and clarity of communication.
We pray for businesses, transport systems and shops as they begin to reopen fully.
We give thanks for the key workers in all areas that support our lives.
We pray for all workers whose employment has gone or is no longer guaranteed.

We pray for this local community and for all people in their daily life and work.
We pray for the young and the elderly, for families, and all who are alone.
We pray for our local schools preparing to welcome back young folk soon.
We give thanks for human skill and creativity and all that reveals your loveliness.

We pray for those who are in need; for the sick, sorrowful and bereaved.
We pray for the residents and staff of local Care Homes.
We pray for all who bring comfort, care and healing, especially within the NHS.
We give thanks for those working to develop a vaccine for Covid-19.
We pray for the people of Beirut in their distress.
We give thanks for human love and friendship and for all that enriches our daily lives.

We pray for all who have gone before us in faith
and for those whose faith is known to you alone.
We pray for the bereaved and those who support them.

Let us commend ourselves, and all for whom we pray,
to the mercy and protection of God.

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Holy Father,
who gathered us here around the table of your Son
to share this meal with the whole household of God:
in that new world where you reveal the fullness of your peace,
gather people of every race and language
to share in the eternal banquet of Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Gracious Father,
revive your Church in our day,
and make her holy, strong and faithful,
for your glory’s sake
in Jesus Christ our Lord;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

NOTICES
Below is reprinted part of a text published by Moira a short while back.
“When will we begin?
We will resume services in September. On the 1st and 3rd Sunday of the month the service will be at Fishbourne, 9.30 a.m. And at Apuldram on the 2nd and 4th Sunday of the month at 8.00 a.m.
Please do note that there will be two trial services on the 23rd and 30th August at Fishbourne Church, 9.30 a.m.
Sorry, but to begin with there will not be any coffee afterwards, again we will review this as time goes by.
At the moment, the Sunday service will be the only one taking place, this is to allow the building to self-clean…”
An online booking system is being set up for the website and as soon as this goes live you will be advised in a future newsletter. More information will follow very soon.

 

TRINITY 8

from The Rev’d David Hider (2nd August 2020)

Welcome! We trust that you are keeping well.
Thank you for joining with us in this on-line act of worship.

Let us first pause to admit to God the sin which always confronts us, before saying:

Almighty God, our heavenly Father,
we have sinned against you and against our neighbour
in thought and word and deed, through negligence, through weakness,        
through our own deliberate fault.        
We are truly sorry and repent of all our sins.        
For the sake of your Son Jesus Christ, who died for us,
forgive us all that is past and grant that we may serve you in newness of life        
to the glory of your name. Amen.

Almighty God, who forgives all who truly repent, have mercy upon us,        
pardon and deliver us from all your sins, confirm and strengthen us in all goodness, and keep us in life eternal; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.        
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,        
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.        
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,        
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;        
you are seated at the right hand of the Father:     receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One,    you alone are the Lord,        
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,        
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.  

We pray today’s Collect (Special Prayer)
Almighty Lord and everlasting God,
we beseech you to direct, sanctify and govern both our hearts and bodies
in the ways of your laws and the works of your commandments;
that through your most mighty protection, both here and ever,
we may be preserved in body and soul;
through our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ,
who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the Letter of Paul to the Romans, chapter 9, verses 1 to 5
I am speaking the truth in Christ. I am not lying; my conscience confirms it by the Holy Spirit. I have great sorrow and unceasing anguish in my heart. For I could wish that I myself were accursed and cut off from Christ for the sake of my own people, my kindred according to the flesh. They are Israelites, and to them belong the adoption, the glory, the covenants, the giving of the law, the worship, and the promises; to them belong the patriarchs, and from them, according to the flesh, comes the Messiah, who is over all, God blessed forever. Amen.

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 14, verses 13 to 21
When Jesus heard that Herod had beheaded John the Baptist, he withdrew from there in a boat to a deserted place by himself. But when the crowds heard it, they followed him on foot from the towns. When he went ashore, he saw a great crowd; and he had compassion for them and cured their sick. When it was evening, the disciples came to him and said, “This is a deserted place, and the hour is now late; send the crowds away so that they may go into the villages and buy food for themselves.” Jesus said to them, “They need not go away; you give them something to eat.” They replied, “We have nothing here but five loaves and two fish.” And he said, “Bring them here to me.” Then he ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass. Taking the five loaves and the two fish, he looked up to heaven, and blessed and broke the loaves, and gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the crowds. And all ate and were filled; and they took up what was left over of the broken pieces, twelve baskets full. And those who ate were about five thousand men, besides women and children.

We reflect upon today’s Message (composed by John Sheppard)
Today’s Gospel reading must be one of the best known stories in the New Testament.  The miracle of the feeding of the five thousand.  Who doesn’t know this wonderful story narrated so beautifully by Matthew?  Perhaps our current circumstances prompt a slightly different look at this familiar passage.

Imagine something disturbing had happened to you.  Perhaps a lost job, a burglary or even the fear of Covid-19 for yourself and those around you.  In situations like this, many people’s instinct is to seek peace and solitude for a while.  A bit of space away from everyone.  In your efforts, you go on a favourite walk alone but the hillside is crowded with other walkers.  You walk along the shore to absorb the sound of the sea but its full of excited swimmers or you visit a local church to think and pray in peace but it turns out to be full of guests for a wedding (maybe one day!!).  Getting away for that bit of tranquillity isn’t always easy.  

This is the kind of experience Jesus was having in this story.  In the verses before our reading, the imprisoned John the Baptist is brutally murdered as a result of politics around Herod and his rather self-centred family.  Jesus has lost a cousin and a colleague and perhaps been reminded of what lies ahead for the rest of his, by now very limited, time on Earth.  Jesus’ teaching had become legendary by this time so, when he understandably goes off in a boat to seek solitude, crowds discover his whereabouts and throng all around him.  

Jesus avoids any frustration or anger and instead shows the crowd understanding and compassion.  Knowing they seek the messages he has become famous for, he translates any anger he may have felt into love for those around him.  The disciples follow his example and try to see things from the crowds’ point of view.  They are hungry; let us send them for some food, they suggest.  Jesus takes this admirable empathy and magnifies it to the point of the miraculous, telling the disciples to give them something to eat rather than send them away to get their own supper.  Using all they had, a meagre five loaves and two fish to feed thousands, with lots left over, remains one of the most dramatic of biblical miracles.

A couple of messages stand out from this story.  Trying to use the energy we get from upset, anger and frustration positively and with love might be one.  Another is that once we have managed this and put love uppermost, and decided how we might show it, God might suggest another, altogether more stretching approach.  Just like Jesus did when the disciples suggested sending people to find something to eat.  Sometimes God’s way might be more difficult and perhaps apparently impossible compared with our ideas.  Perplexed though they might have been, the disciples went along with Jesus’ suggestion and the rest is, as they say, history.  

What a wonderful story this is.  Within its simplicity lie all kinds of relevant messages.  I’m sure if I keep preaching for another century, there will still be unexplored angles of this outstanding piece of Gospel.  

Please consider using these suggestions in your Prayers
Let us by prayer and intercession with thanksgiving make our requests to God.

Gracious God,
We pray for peace, justice and reconciliation for all peoples throughout the world.
We pray for the honouring of human rights for all and for the relief of the oppressed.
We give thanks for all that is gracious in the lives of men, women and children.

We pray for the renewal of the Church in faith, love, humility and service.
We pray for our bishops, for Moira, the Readers, churchwardens and PCC members.
We pray for the life and work of these parishes as they move forward into the future.
We give thanks for the gift of your Word, the grace of the sacraments
and the fellowship of your people wherever they may be.

We pray for this local community and for all people in their daily life and work.
We pray for the young and the elderly, for families and any who are alone.
We pray for all who are continuing to struggle as a result of the Covid-19 lockdown.
We give thanks for human skill and creativity and all that reveals your loveliness.

We pray for those who are in need, especially any facing sudden financial difficulties.
We pray for the sick, sorrowful, fearful and bereaved.
We pray for all who bring comfort, care and healing.
We pray for scientists working to develop treatments to illnesses and injuries.
We give thanks for human love and friendship and for all that enriches our daily lives.

Let us commend ourselves and all for whom we pray,
to the mercy and protection of God.
Merciful Father, accept these prayers for the sake of your Son,
our Saviour Jesus Christ.     Amen.

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Strengthen for service, Lord, the hands that have taken holy things;
may the ears which have heard your word be deaf to clamour and dispute;
may the tongues which have sung your praise be free from deceit;
may the eyes which have seen the tokens of your love shine with the light of hope;
and may the bodies which have been fed with your body
be refreshed with the fullness of your life; glory to you for ever. Amen.

Lord God,
your Son left the riches of heaven and became poor for our sake:
when we prosper save us from pride,
when we are needy save us from despair,
that we may trust in you alone;
and the blessing of God Almighty,
the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit,
be with you and your loved ones,
this day and for evermore. Amen.

Notices
Moira is away up until August 6th (inclusive) and, please, should not be contacted, even by e-mail. Please pray for her as she visits her parents in very difficult and sensitive circumstances.
While she is away, Moira has asked that I cover for her and contact may be made either by telephone on 01243 377636 or by e-mail at revd_d_hider@msn.com, please.

Below is reprinted part of a text published by Moira a few days ago.
“When will we begin?
We will resume services in September. On the 1st and 3rd Sunday of the month the service will be at Fishbourne, 9.30 a.m. And at Apuldram on the 2nd and 4th Sunday of the month at 8.00 a.m.
Please do note that there will be two trial services on the 23rd and 30th August at Fishbourne Church, 9.30 a.m.
Sorry, but to begin with there will not be any coffee afterwards, again we will review this as time goes by.
At the moment, the Sunday service will be the only one taking place, this is to allow the building to self-clean…”

An online booking system is being set up for the website and as soon as this goes live you will be advised in a future newsletter. More information will follow very soon.

 

TRINITY 7
from The Rev’d David Hider (26th July 2020)

We thank you for joining with us in this short on-line act of worship, while we all wait patiently for our safe return to Church life.
We trust that you and those dear to you are finding ways back into living in the new world that faces us and are keeping well.

Let us first pause to admit to God the sin which always confronts us, before saying:

Lord our God, in our sin we have avoided your call.
Our love for you is like a morning cloud, like the dew that goes away early.
Have mercy on us; deliver us from judgement; bind up our wounds and revive us;
in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

May God who loved the world so much that he sent his Son to be our Saviour forgive us our sins and make us holy to serve him in the world, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

[If you want to sing along to the Gloria below, the tune is Ode to Joy]
Glory be to God in heaven,
peace to those who love him well;
on the earth let all his people
speak his grace, his wonders tell:
Lord, we praise you for your glory,
mighty Father, heaven’s king;
hear our joyful adoration
and accept the thanks we bring.

Only Son of God the Father,
Lamb who takes our sin away,
now with God in triumph seated
for your mercy, Lord, we pray:
Jesus Christ, most high and holy,
Saviour, you are God alone
in the glory of the Father
with the Spirit: Three-in-One!

We pray today’s Collect (Special Prayer)
Lord of all power and might, the author and giver of all good things:
graft in our hearts the love of your name, increase in us true religion,
nourish us with all goodness, and of your great mercy keep us in the same;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Today’s readings
A Reading from the Letter of Paul to the Romans, chapter 8, verses 26 to 39
The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 13, verses 31 to 33, 44 to 52

We reflect upon today’s Message
How are you finding life in the ‘new normal’? I hope that you are faring better than me in the interpretation of the new ‘freedoms’ of the post-lockdown era. It seems all very confusing to change from what we have been recently able to do to now having to do something different. And, the logic …? It escapes me. Added to this, we have heard from several ‘experts’ in these past days speaking ominous words about ‘second waves’, ‘multiple waves’, ‘having to live with the virus for ever’, ‘mutating virus trends which may negate any vaccine being readied’, ‘having to stay with restricted lives for some considerable period of time to come’ – to name but a few comments. And, all claimed to be based on ‘the science’! Is it no wonder that so many people are still fearful and in need of some good, positive news? Thankfully, our Gospel text gives us not one, but five, descriptions of the Kingdom of heaven, our ultimate goal in life. All very exciting and all very unambiguous. In the interests of space (and your time to read this!), I have focussed on only two of these descriptions.

Are you, like me, always pleased to read of some amateur detectorist who, by using a hobbyist metal detector in a farmer’s field, turns up a piece of our history in the form (usually) of a precious metal object? And, although not into archaeology myself, do you share my gratitude that many people have dedicated themselves to digs and, in so doing, have turned up gems like Skara Brae in Orkney, revealing an idea of what life was like thousands of years ago (even before Stonehenge!)? ‘The kingdom of heaven is like treasure hidden in a field,’ says Jesus. The person, who comes across the treasure by accident in the daily round of life and work, sells everything else he has and goes and buys the field. Once it is discovered, everything else is worth less. The things that used to be so important no longer are. The values which drive daily life become changed. Power, wealth and sex cease to be the gods which drive our life and they find their proper place in the order of things. They become our servants, rather than lords over us. These things are no longer the obsessions which cause us to strive after them in order to find satisfaction for ourselves – they become, instead, the means by which we can make life have meaning for others.

‘The Kingdom of heaven is like a pearl of great price, says Jesus. The pearl is not always found by accident. Because of a continuing and persistent ‘rumour’ amongst the people of the earth that God is a living God, there are those whose life is about making a search to establish the truth of the rumour. They pray. They read the Scriptures. They listen to the stories that others tell of their journeys of faith. They keep quiet times. They make pilgrimages, both actual and imaginary. They wonder at what has been done by saints in the past. They rejoice when they see men, women and children allowing their faith make a difference now. They delight when good is done. They rejoice in the truth. They laugh at pomposity and reject all false religion. They are like merchants dealing in pearls until they find the one worth more than all the others put together. The Kingdom of heaven is like this. The search is worth making – the journey is part of the fun.

The difference between these two analogies of the Kingdom of heaven is that the treasure was stumbled upon, but the pearl was sought after. Today, we are still treasure hunting, either hoping to accidentally come upon, or deliberately find, the key to the Kingdom. And, thankfully, we are still being shown clues and insights by God, to lead us to that treasure of the Kingdom. It is not like earthly treasure which can be hoarded (only for a time) – heaven’s treasure grows with the sharing because it has been made with eternity in view. It means we can be generous with the knowledge that we are given – because shared knowledge of God has never yet impoverished anyone.

But, the Kingdom of heaven comes with a price. In today’s parable, Jesus is saying: ‘If you want to be a part of the Kingdom, you need to give up other things. Jettison everything for God, and you will receive more than you have parted with.’ There is the challenge – and each of us will meet it in a different way. For some, it will mean, literally, parting physically with a fortune. For others, they will use what they have as dedicated to God. Yet others may feel they already have nothing material to give – and, they will need to pray for God to show them talents, gifts and graces as yet unrealised, which they can indeed contribute to the advancement of his Kingdom. We all have, or can do, something – and invariably our ‘something’ includes and involves someone else. But, as we are told in Psalm 118, verse 6, (‘With the Lord on my side I do not fear.’), God is on our side. He is looking to the advancement of his Kingdom. And his plans will succeed.

Let us note that there is the blessed implication in Jesus’ words that the Kingdom of heaven is attainable when we have ‘sold’ what we have. If we invest everything that God has given us – from material things to the fruits of his Spirit (Galatians 5:22,23) – we can obtain the Kingdom. It may be priceless in earthly terms, but it is affordable in spiritual, heavenly currency. So, let us make sure we are dealing in the right market. Note, too, that the man in Jesus’ parable took joy in parting with everything in order to gain the best. God is not after folk who will wear a martyr’s robe while still years away from the heavenly plinth. He does not want us to part unwillingly with anything. The Kingdom of heaven is not for stubborn people, yearning always for the heady life they have forfeited (or believe they have forfeited). God is offering more than we can give – and, we are not called to part with anything that can compare with what we stand to gain. Indeed, when we think about it, it is a magnificently, divinely unfair bargain. It is attainable and just the good news for our current time. The question is: ‘Deal – or no deal?’

Please consider using these suggestions in your Prayers
Father God, we lift to you in prayer:

front-line staff within the NHS and all who support their work;
the residents and staff of our Care Homes;
any who are suffering from illness or who have been bereaved;
the key workers in all areas that support our lives;
those working to develop a vaccine and using science to defeat coronavirus;
our Government, national and local, for wisdom and clarity of communication;
our schools, businesses, transport systems, shops as they begin to reopen fully;
for those pondering the requirement to return to work or send children to school;
for those who have found that their previous employment is no longer guaranteed;
for any known to us who, for any reason, need our prayers at this time,
for those who, through fear, are finding the release from restrictions difficult;
for Moira, churchwardens and others with responsibility for reopening our churches.

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Lord God, whose Son is the true vine and the source of life,
ever giving himself that the world may live:
may we so receive within ourselves
the power of his death and passion
that, in his saving cup,
we may share his glory and be made perfect in his love;
for he is alive and reigns, now and for ever. Amen.

Lord God, you have taught us to pray at you as ‘our Father’.
Help us to see the world through your eyes and to love your children with your love.
Show us how we can share with them the knowledge of your Fatherhood
and an experience of your redeeming grace in your Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Generous God,
you give us gifts and make them grow:
though our faith is small as mustard seed,
make it grow to your glory
and the flourishing of your Kingdom;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

Notices (and it has become a tradition for an act of worship to include Notices!)

Firstly, Moira is now away up until and including August 6th and, please, should not be contacted, even by e-mail. Please pray for her as she visits her parents in very difficult and sensitive circumstances.

While she is away, Moira has asked that I cover for her and contact may be made either by telephone on 01243 377636 or by e-mail at revd_d_hider@msn.com, please.

Secondly, a reminder to re-read the electronic notice sent out last Wednesday with the invitation to a Garden Tea with John and Caroline Sheppard on August 2nd as a fundraiser for the Church. Must be pre-booked by July 31st. For more details click here.

TRINITY 6

(From The Rev’d Canon Moira Wickens – 19th July 2020)

Good morning everyone, I trust you are all well. Thank you for joining us once again.

The Lord be with you.

Almighty God, to whom all hearts are open, all desires known, and from whom no secrets are hidden;
Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit,
That we may perfectly love you, and worthily magnify your Holy Name; through Christ our Lord. Amen.

God so loved the world, that He gave His only Son Jesus Christ to save us from our sins, to be our advocate in heaven, and to bring us to eternal life.

We say sorry for those times we have forgotten how much God loves us.
Most merciful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we confess that we have sinned in thought, word and deed.

We have not loved you with our whole heart. We have not loved our neighbours as ourselves.

In your mercy forgive what we have been, help us to amend what we are, and direct what we shall be, that we may do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with you, our God. Amen.

Almighty God, who forgives all who truly repent, have mercy upon you, pardon and deliver you from all your sins, confirm and strengthen you in all goodness, and keep you in life eternal; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

The Gloria.
Glory to God in the highest, and peace to His people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
We worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the world: have mercy upon us,
You are seated at the right hand of the Father, receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
You alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit, In the glory of God, the Father. Amen

The Collect Prayer

Merciful God, you have prepared for those who love you such good things as pass our understanding: pour into our hearts such love toward you that we, loving you in all things and above all things, may obtain your promises, which exceed all we can desire; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit; one God, now and forever. Amen.

Readings.
Romans 8. V.12-25
Matthew 13. V.24-30 &36-43

This week’s reflection is from Jenny

Reflection for Sunday 19th July

I guess when we think about the parable and its explanation in the Gospel reading we all remember the words “weeping and gnashing of teeth”. They’re so descriptive and very scary, BUT if we focus only on this we’re missing out on what it teaches us about the character of God. We need to bring to this parable all we know of God’s unconditional love for us.

God is patient but we find waiting so difficult. Just now we want our lives to get back to normal quickly. We want to see our friends again, have a haircut, hug our loved ones and not have to avoid people. The farmer in the story watched patiently, restraining his servants from pulling up the weeds in case they damaged the good wheat.

God has his own timetable. We so often ask him to act straight away and it’s hard to understand why he sometimes seems inactive. But if we think back to the Old Testament and how the Israelites waited and waited for the Messiah to come, we can see that God didn’t let the people down. St Paul put it like this in Romans 5:6, “For while we were still weak, at the right time Christ died for the ungodly. 

God still has a plan and one day at the right time Jesus will come again. This parable tells us that then he will deal with the evil that spoils the world. We live in the waiting time between Christ’s death on the cross and his resurrection and the end of the age.

A first century Palestinian audience would have known what these weeds were like. They were a farmer’s nightmare because wheat and weeds looked so alike in the early stages of growth that weeding was an impossible task. Later when the difference could easily be seen the weeds’ roots had so interwoven with the wheat’s roots that if you pulled out the weeds some good wheat would come out as well. The farmer wasn’t going to let this happen but it meant being patient until harvest time.

This parable speaks to us of the balance between God’s justice and the need to deal with evil and his merciful loving kindness and care. We see God’s love and his mercy, exemplified all through the Gospel stories in the life of Jesus.

It’s the same Jesus, the Son of Man, who will come again to be our judge. Jesus, who loves us so much he died for us so that we can find forgiveness and have eternal life. We are all wrongdoers and need to come to God and say sorry but we could not have a more loving and merciful judge than the Lord Jesus.

In the reading from Romans, St Paul is certain that we are safe in God’s hands and there are some wonderful promises here for those who have put their trust in God and look to him for direction rather than pleasing themselves and going their our way.

St Paul also refers to the waiting time. He likens it to the pain of childbirth, “the whole creation has been groaning in labour pains” but one day this will change. This is what God’s word says to us and this is our hope.

How do we live our lives in the light of our readings today? Paul urges us to walk in the Spirit, to be led by the Holy Spirit. Matthew’s Gospel has highlighted God’s justice, yes, but also Jesus’ loving kindness, mercy and his patience with us. May we, following Jesus’ example, act with love and patience to our families and friends, to each other and every-one we meet.  

My love and best wishes to you all. Jenny

This week we pray for:

Our local schools as they prepare for the summer holidays.
Our local communities.
The new bishops of Horsham and Lewis
Those who are worried about their jobs or homes.
Our families, friends and neighbours.
Those who are unwell.
The family of Jean Jackson as they prepare for her funeral on Tuesday.

Almighty God, you have promised to hear the prayers of those who ask in your Son’s name; we pray that what we have asked faithfully we may obtain effectively; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

Notices.

An enormous thank you from Mrs Day and the year 6 pupils at Fishbourne School for the bibles which were presented to them last week. Although they were not able to have the usual leavers assembly, they did have a very special service, and I was able to wish them well and give them a Blessing. The wonders of modern technology.

Resuming Services. A detailed update about where we are up to and how things will be done, will be with you very soon. But to keep you in the picture. Because I am not actually allowed to be out and about much until August, due to being in the high-risk group, and then I need to visit my Mum, who as you know is nearing the end of her life. The PCC’s pf both our churches proposed and agreed to continue as we are until the beginning of September, when we will resume services. I thank them for their care, support and understanding at this very difficult time. The Bishop has also given us his permission and blessing. And I thank you all for your prayers and patience.

The Blessing.
May the road rise up to meet you,
The wind be always at your back.
The sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall softly on your fields,
And, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand.The blessing of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit be upon us, this day and always. Amen.
And so be at peace, with God, with yourself and with those around you.

TRINITY 5

(From Rev’d David Hider – 12th July 2020)

While we all wait patiently for our safe return to Church life,
we thank you for joining with us in this short on-line act of worship.
We trust that you and those dear to you are keeping well.

Let us first pause to admit to God the sin which always confronts us, before saying:

Lord God,
we have sinned against you;
we have done evil in your sight.
We are sorry and repent.
Have mercy on us according to your love.
Wash away our wrongdoing and cleanse us from our sin.
Renew a right spirit within us
and restore us to the joy of your salvation,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

May the God of love bring us back to himself,
forgive us our sins, and assure us of his eternal love in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

We pray today’s Collect (Special Prayer)
Almighty and everlasting God,
by whose Spirit the whole body of the Church
is governed and sanctified: hear our prayer
which we offer for all your faithful people,
that in their vocation and ministry
they may serve you in holiness and truth
to the glory of your name;
through our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the Letter to the Romans, chapter 8, verses 1 to 11
There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has set you free from the law of sin and of death. For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do: by sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and to deal with sin, he condemned sin in the flesh, so that the just requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit. For those who live according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the Spirit set their minds on the things of the Spirit. To set the mind on the flesh is death, but to set the mind on the Spirit is life and peace. For this reason the mind that is set on the flesh is hostile to God; it does not submit to God’s law – indeed it cannot, and those who are in the flesh cannot please God. But you are not in the flesh; you are in the Spirit, since the Spirit of God dwells in you. Anyone who does not have the Spirit of Christ does not belong to him. But if Christ is in you, though the body is dead because of sin, the Spirit is life because of righteousness. If the Spirit of him who raised Jesus from the dead dwells in you, he who raised Christ from the dead will give life to your mortal bodies also through his Spirit that dwells in you.

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 13, verses 1 to 9, 18 to 23
That same day Jesus went out of the house and sat beside the sea. Such great crowds gathered around him that he got into a boat and sat there, while the whole crowd stood on the beach. And he told them many things in parables, saying: “Listen! A sower went out to sow. And as he sowed, some seeds fell on the path, and the birds came and ate them up. Other seeds fell on rocky ground, where they did not have much soil, and they sprang up quickly, since they had no depth of soil. But when the sun rose, they were scorched; and since they had no root, they withered away. Other seeds fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked them. Other seeds fell on good soil and brought forth grain, some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty. Let anyone with ears listen! …

Hear then the parable of the sower. When anyone hears the word of the kingdom and does not understand it, the evil one comes and snatches away what is sown in the heart; this is what was sown on the path. As for what was sown on rocky ground, this is the one who hears the word and immediately receives it with joy; yet such a person has no root, but endures only for a while, and when trouble or persecution arises on account of the word, that person immediately falls away. As for what was sown among thorns, this is the one who hears the word, but the cares of the world and the lure of wealth choke the word, and it yields nothing. But as for what was sown on good soil, this is the one who hears the word and understands it, who indeed bears fruit and yields, in one case a hundredfold, in another sixty, and in another thirty.”

We reflect upon today’s Message
As Christians, we share part of the Bible – the Old Testament – with the Jewish people. The incomparable riches in the stories, imageries and teaching that we find in this part of the Bible, we owe to them. And, yet, Judaism and Christianity, though both are rooted in these Scriptures, are two separate faiths. We also share Jesus – after all, he was a Jew. But, we do not share one Lord. The Jews do not recognise their own son as Lord, as do Christians. Sadly, though, it is also true that Christians have created more than one Church in the name of Jesus. For me, it is always difficult to sing the hymn, ‘Thy hand, O Lord, has guided’, which ends with the words: ‘one Church, one Faith, one Lord’ – except in the prayerful hope that, one day, this may be true (but, sadly, I am not expecting this to happen in my lifetime!). The ridiculous fact is that there is no one ‘Christian Church’.  There are, however, many different denominations and traditions, each with its own history and its own tarnished past and present – and, often engaged in activities of which Jesus could never have approved. From its earliest days to the present time, witch-hunts, endless wars, unholy confrontations and divisions in the name of Christianity, have appalled the world and marred the witness of the followers of Jesus. Even in current times, the Church of England manages to offend the very Scriptures which underpin the Church’s teaching of the Christian faith with some of its more recent popularist leanings and, yet, has not found time to debate some of the more appalling breaches to the rights to life, safeguarding of some of the more vulnerable in society both here and abroad, equal opportunity for all and freedom to choose within the sanctity of God. It is no wonder that, at times, it seems Christians have hardly begun to understand what Jesus’ mission and message was about. Yes, it would seem that much of the seed – the truth of the Parable of the Sower that Jesus preached – has fallen on the path, among the stones or the weeds and not into the good ground. But, the challenge remains. As for what was sown on the good soil, this is he or she who hears the word and understands it. And, thankfully, over the centuries and today, there have plenty who fall into this category!

So, how good are we at hearing? Have you ever played the game Chinese Whispers? Preaching on today’s text many years ago at the Church at Peacehaven, we did just that. To the first person on one side of the Church, using also visual actions as a clue, I whispered the saying: ‘God gave us two ears and one mouth so that we could listen twice as much as we speak’ and asked that person to whisper the saying to the person alongside them and so on. It was clear that, within a very few people, all was not going well. We persevered until everyone had participated and it was the job of the last person to be passed the message to whisper it back to me. Not one word of the original text was returned! Not one! But, it was a lot of fun – especially since some of the so-called ‘whispers’ could be heard half way round the church – as everyone, young and old, had entered into the spirit of the exercise. Had we been in Church today, I would have liked to try the experiment again!

So, just how good are we at hearing? To get some sort of answer, we only have to look at the current ‘new normal’ of our lives with its government-led guidance and restrictions. Perhaps, it is because of the apparent complexity of what we are being told, my observations would seem to suggest that people are ‘hearing’ many versions of the same instructions, especially if one judges by the varied actions that they are taking as interpretation of what they are hearing. Not all can be right. But, my guess is that, if questioned, every person could ‘justify’ their actions against what they would claim to have heard. Of course, what is needed for the virus to be quelled is for everyone to hear and understand the guidance in a very similar way and, then, to act accordingly. The ‘Chinese Whispers’ version that seems so prevalent will not get the results needed. This is the time that we all need to learn to become ‘good soil’.

And, that is the core of that message within what we call ‘the Parable of the Sower’. The parables of Jesus are the parables of the Kingdom – that is, the reign of God in every human heart and mind, in every family, in every Church and community and, ultimately, in every land and nation. That reign began in Jesus, ‘the Word made flesh’. He was the good soil into which God sowed the seed of his Kingdom here on earth. He heard and understood what God wanted him to say, to do and to be. The reign of God was established in his words, his work, his life, his death and his resurrection – and, he calls us to love as he loved and to understand as he understood.

So, in what state – what type of soil – are we to respond to his call?  
Are we hardened by the experiences of life?
Are we shallow by our casual approach to life’s challenges?
Are we contaminated by distracting worries that surround our life?
Are we receptive and ready to respond, no matter what?  
Be honest with the answer. Just how has God’s Word taken root in our lives? If we could have anything and everything we could want, but forfeited eternal life with God, would such things be so desirable? So, what kind of soil are we? Our life – eternal life – depends upon our answer! Perhaps, to help with our quest to become good (better?) soil, this would be a good time to remember that God gave us two ears and one mouth so that we could listen twice as much as we speak.

Please consider using these suggestions in your Prayers
Father God, we lift to you in prayer:
front-line staff within the NHS and all who support their work;
the residents and staff of our Care Homes;
any who are suffering from illness or who have been bereaved;
the key workers in all areas that support our lives;
those working to develop a vaccine and using science to defeat coronavirus;
our Government, national and local, for wisdom and clarity of communication;
our schools, businesses, transport systems, shops as they begin to reopen fully;
for those pondering the requirement to return to work or send children to school;
for those who have found that their previous employment is no longer guaranteed;
for any known to us who, for any reason, need our prayers at this time,
for those who, through fear, are finding the release from restrictions difficult;
for Moira, churchwardens and others with responsibility for reopening our churches.

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Grant, O Lord, we beseech you,
that the course of this world may be so peaceably ordered by your governance,
that your Church may joyfully serve you in all godly quietness;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

Heavenly Father, we thank you for calling us to be your servants.
Help us gladly to hear and respond to your call and to obey your will.
Make us ready for every demand you make on our lives,
that we may serve you faithfully and show your love to the world;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Grant us, O Lord our God,
to you, a heart of flame;
to our brothers and sisters, a heart of love;
to ourselves, a heart of steel.
We ask it in Christ’s name. Amen.

Almighty God, send down upon your Church the riches of your Spirit,
and kindle in all who minister the Gospel your countless gifts of grace;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore.

 

 

TRINITY 4.

(From Rev’d Canon Moira Wickens – 5th July 2020)

Good morning everyone, I trust that you are all well. Thank you for joining us once again.

The Lord be with you.

Almighty God, to whom all hearts are open, all desires known, and from whom no secrets are hidden;
Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit,
That we may perfectly love you, and worthily magnify your Holy Name; through Christ our Lord. Amen.

God so loved the world, that He gave His only Son Jesus Christ to save us from our sins, to be our advocate in heaven, and to bring us to eternal life.

We say sorry for those times we have forgotten how much God loves us.

Most merciful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we confess that we have sinned in thought, word and deed.
We have not loved you with our whole heart. We have not loved our neighbours as ourselves.

In your mercy forgive what we have been, help us to amend what we are, and direct what we shall be, that we may do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with you, our God. Amen.

Almighty God, who forgives all who truly repent, have mercy upon you, pardon and deliver you from all your sins, confirm and strengthen you in all goodness, and keep you in life eternal; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

The Gloria.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to His people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
We worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.

Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the world: have mercy upon us,
You are seated at the right hand of the Father, receive our prayer.

For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
You alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit, In the glory of God, the Father. Amen

The Collect Prayer.

O God, the protector of all who trust in you, without whom nothing is strong, nothing is Holy.
Increase and multiply upon us your mercy, that with you as our ruler and guide, we may so pass through things temporal that we lose not our hold on things eternal.

Grant this, heavenly Father, for Jesus Christ’s sake, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.

Romans 7, 11-25
Matthew 11, 16-19, 25-End

This week’s reflection is from John.

In more normal times, although I would rarely ask, people sometimes feel the need to explain to me why I don’t see them at Church on Sunday mornings. Children’s activities, DIY, lying in with a lovely breakfast and gardening (at least at this time of the year), top the list of reasons. It always sounds like making time for worship can be deprioritised. The idea of it being on offer at all seems to make a crowded week even more full of choices and decisions, increasing life’s burdens.

Although a world away from current conditions, this seems a pity. In our Gospel reading for the day, Matthew quotes Jesus talking about the theme of the Sabbath. One quote “Come to me, all of you who are tired from carrying heavy loads and I will give you rest” (11,28) particularly resonates. The beginning of chapter 12 develops this; it talks about Jesus doing healing on a Sabbath and satisfying his disciples hunger by picking grain for them to eat. Both of these acts were against practice of the time; strict rules applied to what could and could not be done on the day of rest and Jesus appeared to break them.

So two points come through here. First, Jesus feels he has authority over the Sabbath using the time constructively to help people where he could, even if this was against earthly rules, which he often questioned. Second, the Sabbath was instated to give people refreshment, rather than add still further to their burdens. A time to pause, rest and unashamedly have some “me and God” time.

Turning to our Epistle, at times I’m with David on St Paul. As he said last month, his writing can be difficult and this week we are treated to no less than 15 of his verses to the Romans. I’m sure those of you who have read this will agree that its difficult to interpret and, given Pauls background as a pious Jew,

its not obvious how it applies to him, but the top-level message is clear. Sin in its widest sense is something human nature finds difficult if not impossible to avoid unaided. Paul says that whoever we are, the best of intentions to do good, without help, will eventually be tripped up by sin. The Christians in Rome could be forgiven for thinking that they were rather on their own and if they were to live a real Christian life, given their human nature, they needed help. Verse 25 is thus very important. In it, Paul highlights that none of us is left on our own. We all have help available from God, through Jesus, if we choose to accept it. A message as true for us as it was for first century Romans.

Through lock-down I’ve heard lots of people (shouting from 2m away) re- evaluating their priorities and planning a different approach once we all emerge. Hopefully for some, this might involve taking time to accept the help Paul refers to. Maybe Sundays can become the gift Jesus meant them to be rather than just yet another of the burdens of modern life!!

Keep safe and God Bless

This week we pray for:

Our PCC members who will meet this coming week.
Our Church Wardens.
Our Treasurers, who have kept the church accounts up to date.
Those who are worried about their jobs.
Our families, friends and neighbours.
Those who are unwell.
All those who this week return to work, and for those who cannot take this step yet.

Almighty God, you have promised to hear the prayers of those who ask in your Son’s name; we pray that what we have asked faithfully we may obtain effectively; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

Notices:

Once again, thank you to all those who were able to come to the church car park to give thanks for Marjorie’s life.

And an enormous thanks once again for your amazing generosity. We have purchased the bibles for this year’s school leavers, the cost of which has almost been met by you. I delivered them to the school on Friday, and they will be given out on our behalf before the end of term. A bible is the greatest gift that we can give to a young person as they continue their journey through life. For a year group who have missed out on so much this year, it is lovely that the church has been able maintain the tradition. So, thank you.

The PCC’s will meet this coming week so as to work out how our services can be resumed while keeping everyone safe. Your wellbeing is my ultimate priority and so we will continue with on-line services until I am absolutely confident that everything is in place.

The Blessing.

May the road rise up to meet you,
The wind be always at your back.
The sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall softly on your fields,
And, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of His hand.

The blessing of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit be upon us, this day and always. Amen.

And so be at peace, with God, with yourself and with those around you.

 

Trintiy 3

(From Rev’d David Hider – Sunday 28th June 2020).

THANK YOU for joining with us in this act of on-line worship. We trust that you and those dear to you are keeping well.

We begin by considering our failures. So, come, let us return to the Lord and say:
Lord God, our maker and our redeemer,
this is your world and we are your people: come among us and save us.

We have wilfully misused your gifts of creation; Lord, be merciful: forgive us our sin.

We have seen the ill-treatment of others and have not gone to their aid; Lord, be merciful: forgive us our sin.

We have condoned evil and dishonesty and failed to strive for justice; Lord, be merciful: forgive us our sin.

We have heard the good news of Christ, but have failed to share it with others; Lord, be merciful: forgive us our sin.

We have not loved you with all our heart, nor our neighbours as ourselves; Lord, be merciful: forgive us our sin.

May the God of love bring us back to himself,
forgive us our sins, and assure us of his eternal love in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us; you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

We pray today’s Collect (Special Prayer)

Almighty God, you have broken the tyranny of sin
and have sent the Spirit of your Son into our hearts whereby we call you Father:
give us grace to dedicate our freedom to your service,
that we and all creation may be brought to the glorious liberty of the children of God; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen

A Reading from the Letter to the Romans, chapter 6, verses 12 to 23

Therefore, do not let sin exercise dominion in your mortal bodies, to make you obey their passions. No longer present your members to sin as instruments of wickedness, but present yourselves to God as those who have been brought from death to life, and present your members to God as instruments of righteousness. For sin will have no dominion over you, since you are not under law but under grace.

What then? Should we sin because we are not under law but under grace? By no means! Do you not know that if you present yourselves to anyone as obedient slaves, you are slaves of the one whom you obey, either of sin, which leads to death, or of obedience, which leads to righteousness? But thanks be to God that you, having once been slaves of sin, have become obedient from the heart to the form of teaching to which you were entrusted, and that you, having been set free from sin, have become slaves of righteousness. I am speaking in human terms because of your natural limitations. For just as you once presented your members as slaves to impurity and to greater and greater iniquity, so now present your members as slaves to righteousness for sanctification.

When you were slaves of sin, you were free in regard to righteousness. So what advantage did you then get from the things of which you now are ashamed? The end of those things is death. But now that you have been freed from sin and enslaved to God, the advantage you get is sanctification. The end is eternal life. For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

The Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to Matthew, chapter 10, verses 40 to 42

[Jesus said to the twelve:] “Whoever welcomes you welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes the one who sent me. Whoever welcomes a prophet in the name of a prophet will receive a prophet’s reward; and whoever welcomes a righteous person in the name of a righteous person will receive the reward of the righteous; and whoever gives even a cup of cold water to one of these little ones in the name of a disciple – truly I tell you, none of these will lose their reward.”

We reflect upon today’s Message

Getting into lockdown was sooooo simple. The government said ‘do it, or else!’ and we did – because the ‘or else’ was defined as a risk of dying from the virus if we didn’t, or causing someone else to. However, getting out of lockdown … So many rules! So many combinations! So many confusions! For someone like me, it is difficult to my head around. And, of course, it’s all multiplied by four different ‘governmental’ interpretations – all within the UK! – very relevant when you have a daughter in one of them. Then, of course, there is the public reaction to the latest relaxations – every grading from ‘I want to stay in lockdown mode forever’ to ‘Let’s get back to the old normal – and now!’ And, just how are we to know in which category people are when we come across them? I have to admit to be baffled and somewhat worried as to how I am expected to act towards others. I am sure things will sort themselves out in time, but I find such sentiment of little comfort in the here and now. What we need is some good news that we can easily understand.

And we have it, today, in spades! St Paul ends his teaching for us with a wonderful message: ‘Eternal life is a free gift from God.’ No ifs, no buts, no conditions! It is not something that we can earn. It is not something that must be paid back. It does not come because of something of our own doing. It is a gift; a gift that cannot be purchased; a gift given out of love. It is a gift that God has freely offered to each one of us and a gift that we should accept with thanksgiving. Eternal life is Christ’s currency – that is, new life with God that begins on earth and continues for ever with God. And, to emphasise the point, this gift is offered to each one of us. What a joyful start to release us from our current struggles! And, surely, being so good and so unlimited, it is something that we would want to share with others to also help them become free. Or, as our Gospel text puts it, how much we love God in our response to his offering us this gift can be measured by how well we treat others in the sharing of it. The use of the picture of giving a cup of cold water to a thirsty child shows the model that we ought to follow. Unselfish service. And, in doing so, we need to remind ourselves that God notices every good deed that we do – or don’t do – as if he were the one receiving it!

But, let’s do the technical background bit first. The Gospel text sets out the four links in the chain of salvation.
(i) There is God (‘the one who sent’ Jesus) out of whose love the whole process of salvation began.

(ii)  There is Jesus (the orator of the text) who brought that message to people.

(iii)  There is the human messenger, the prophet who speaks, the good person who is an example, the disciple who learns – who, in turn, all pass on to others the good news which they themselves have received.

(iv) There is the believer who welcomes God’s people and God’s message and who, as a result, finds life to his/her soul. As a result, in today’s reading, there is something very lovely for every humble soul.

Thankfully, to make it clear, not all human messengers are called to be prophets, to preach and proclaim the word of God. I am sure that many of you will be relieved to hear this! However, we are told that the person who gives God’s messenger the simple gift of hospitality will receive no less a reward than the prophet himself. And, hospitality is, surely, within the realm of everyone. We will know that, throughout the ages: there is many a person who has been a great public figure (think Nelson Mandela); there is many a person whose voice has kindled the hearts of thousands of people (think Malala Yousafzai); there is many a person who has carried an almost intolerable burden of public service and public responsibility (think Tracy Daszkiewicz, Wiltshire’s Director of Public Health at the time of the Novichok poisonings in Salisbury; think NHS front-line staff during the current pandemic crisis).

Yet, the vast majority of such people would gladly bear witness that they could never have survived the effort and the demands of their task, were it not for the love and the care and the sympathy and the service of someone ‘at home’ who was never in the public eye at all. When true greatness is measured up in the sight of God, it will be seen, again and again, that the person who greatly moved the world was entirely dependent on someone who, as far as the world is concerned, remained unknown. Even the New Testament prophet must get his breakfast and have his clothes attended to! Let those who have the often thankless task of making a home, cooking meals, washing clothes, shopping for household necessities, caring for children or other dependents, and so on, never think of it as a dreary and weary round. It is one of God’s greatest tasks – and they will be far more likely to receive the prophet’s reward than those whose days are filled with duties, committees, tasks – and, yet, whose homes are comfortless and lives loveless. To give a personal example, my own ministry, however it is (and has been) perceived by others, would not have been possible without the support and sacrifice of Janet, my long-suffering wife – and my hope and prayer is that this will be recognised and rewarded at the last, because, sadly and badly, many a time, I have failed to recognise it in situ.

Secondly, thank goodness, we are not all expected to be shining examples of goodness. Simply, we cannot all stand out in the world’s eye as righteous. But, the one who helps a good person to be good receives a good person’s reward – and, surely, we can all try to do that.

Thirdly, we cannot all teach the child – but there is a real sense in which we can all serve the child. We may not have either the knowledge or the technique to teach (as many have found out while home-schooling of children during the current lockdown!) – but, there are simple duties to be done without which the child cannot live. It may be that, in this Bible text, it is not so much children-in-age of whom Jesus is thinking as children-in-the-faith, as it seems very likely what the Rabbis called their disciples was ‘the little ones’. However, for us, it may be that, in the technical, academic sense, we cannot teach – but, there is a teaching by life and example which even the least academic of people can give to another.

The great beauty of today’s Gospel text is its stress on simple, achievable-by-all things. This should be an encouragement to every single one of us which ought to help bring a joy and freedom to our faithful living. It is still true that the Church and

Christ will always need their great orators, their great shining examples of sainthood, their great teachers and academics – those whose names become household words. But, the Church and Christ will also always need those in whose homes there is hospitality, on whose hands there is all the service which makes a home, and in whose hearts there is the caring which is Christian love. This is also how we best share God’s love. This is how we best witness to him. Serving one another – ‘giving a cup of cold water to someone who is thirsty.’ In saying this, the words of another well-known saying creep into my mind: ‘All service ranks the same with God.’ (PS I had to look up who had said it! Robert Browning). There are no restrictions to such an achievable-by-all approach to Christian service originating from hospitality. And, the good news is that it brings closer the chance of the free gift of eternal life for both giver and receiver.

Please use these suggestions in your Prayers

Father God, we lift to you in prayer:
front-line staff within the NHS and all who support their work;
the residents and staff of our Care Homes;
any who are suffering from illness or who have been bereaved;
the people who bring food and essential supplies to our stores or doors;
the key workers in all areas that support our lives;
those working to develop a vaccine and using science to defeat coronavirus;
our Government, national and local, for wisdom and clarity of communication; those determining a way out of lockdown to take balanced risks;
the armed forces redeployed to various tasks within the nation;
our schools, businesses, transport systems, shops as they prepare to reopen fully; for those pondering the challenges of returning to work or sending children to school;
for any known to us who, for any reason, need our prayers at this time,

including the family and friends of Marjorie Stevens (whose funeral is on July 1st)

and Moira and her family;
for those who, through fear, are finding the release from restrictions difficult;
for Moira, churchwardens and others with responsibility for reopening our churches.

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread. Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

O God, whose beauty is beyond our imagining
and whose power we cannot comprehend:
show us your glory as far as we can grasp it,
and shield us from knowing more than we can bear until we may look upon you without fear;
through Jesus Christ our Saviour. Amen.

Lord God, whose we are and whom we serve: we place our lives afresh in your hands.
Take us as we are, and make us what you would have us to be;
and so fill us with your Holy Spirit that we may be strong for your service
and used wholly for your glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Support us, O Lord, all the day long of this troublous life,
until the shadows lengthen and the evening comes,
the busy world is hushed, the fever of life is over and our work is done.
Then, Lord, in your mercy grant us a safe lodging, a holy rest, and peace at the last; through Christ our Lord. Amen.

God our Saviour,
look on this wounded world
in pity and in power;
hold us fast to your promises of peace won for us by your Son,
our Saviour Jesus Christ;
and the blessing of God Almighty,
the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit be with you and your loved ones,
this day and for evermore. Amen.

And, finally, a personal note.
At the time of preparing the above writing, the Government has just announced that Churches can reopen for Services starting from July 5th. There has not yet been issued any guidance as to the conditions of such reopening (NB The Diocesan Bishop promises to send it in the next few days.) However, we can be sure that it will not be to the same ways that Services were offered before lockdown. Social distancing; sanitisation stations; limited numbers; registration of attendees; controlled routes around the building; no books to be used; no hymns to be sung; ministers in PPE; a thorough cleansing of the building after each act of worship – the list is endless. What is not mentioned among these important, practical requirements is consideration for the health and well-being of the clergy. Readers will know ‘our’ Moira is in the ‘at high risk group’ re Covid-19. This will not change with the easing of restrictions. She will have to continue to follow her consultant’s advice. Therefore she needs to be looked after! This will limit her ability to fully function during the immediate period of release into our ‘new normal’ of Church worship and activity. No ifs, no buts, about this! And, on a personal note, July 5th was meant to be a key date for me as, being a few days after the thirtieth anniversary of my ordination as a priest, it was the day that I had thought would be a good point to take a step back from regular ministry. However, in the light of the current situation, I have promised Moira that I will continue to support her in this immediate period of ‘new normal’ to help in any way needed. But, there are aspects which also place me in ‘the needing to take care’ category, so I shall also have to be wary about what I do. So, yes, Churches might, legally, be able to reopen for worship from July 5th – but, sadly, it is not as straightforward as that. Please pray for all those who are trying to find a way through all the new requirements to get ‘live’ Services back on stream. Thank you.

 

The Second Sunday after Trinity. (From Rev’d Canon Moira Wickens – Sunday 21st June 2020)

Good morning everyone, thank you for joining in with this short act of worship.

Before we begin, it is with great sadness that I announce that Marjorie Stevens died on Tuesday 17th June. Marjorie had been a much-loved, faithful member of our church for many years, before going into a nursing home a while ago. Her funeral will take place in Fishbourne church, on Wednesday 1st July at 11.00 a.m. Unfortunately, due to the restrictions that have to be adhered to, only her immediate family will attend. But, so that we can all pay our respects, and give thanks for everything that Marjorie gave to, and did for our church, I invite you to come to the church, towards the end of the service, line the car park, keeping a distance from one another. And then as Marjorie is driven off to the cemetery, ‘Let us clap for Marjorie’. It would be such a support to the family if as many of you as possible were able to come, even if you didn’t know her, she was part of us. I hope you can make it.

Let’s just pause for a moment of quiet, as we give our own personal thanks for Marjorie’s gentle peaceful soul. May she rest in peace.

The Lord be with you.

We say sorry to God.

In the wilderness we find your grace, you love us with an everlasting love.
Lord have mercy.
There is none but you to uphold our cause.
Christ have mercy.
Heal us, O Lord, and we shall be healed, restore us and we shall know your joy.
Lord have mercy.
May Almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life. Amen.

The Gloria, tune: Ode to joy.
Glory be to God in Heaven,
Peace to those who love Him well,
On the earth let all His people
Speak His grace, His wonders tell:
Lord, we praise you for your glory,
Mighty Father, heaven’s king,
Hear our joyful adoration
And accept the thanks we bring.

The Collect Prayer.

Lord, you have taught us that all our doings without love are nothing worth;
Send your Holy Spirit and pour into our hearts that most excellent gift of love,
The true bond of peace and of all virtues,
Without which whoever lives is counted dead before you.
Grant this for your only Son Jesus Christ’s sake,
Who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever, Amen.

Readings for today: Rom. 6. V. 1b-11 and Matt. 10. V. 24-39

Reflection by Jenny Blamire

In almost every alpha group I’ve helped with, when we’ve been discussing God’s forgiveness, the question has been asked, “If God forgives all our sin, can we just go on doing wrong and then say sorry and he will forgive us?” It’s the same question St Paul is answering here in Romans.

Do you remember the Sunday of the August bank holiday last year?  It was one of the hottest days of the year. We were going to meet our family at Bracklesham Bay on the Sunday afternoon. Our son phoned at lunch time. “Don’t go via the Birdham Straight, you’ll never make it. We’re still trying to get home from morning church!” The traffic jams were memorable. The day for us was special for another reason. One of our grandsons was to be baptised in the sea. It was baptism by total immersion and as I read the Romans reading it reminded me of this happy occasion.

On the beach our grandson was declaring his desire to closely follow Jesus. He had given his life to Christ to be and do the things Jesus has planned for him.
When he went into the water he was as it were immersed into the death of Jesus. Paul describes this as “our old self being crucified with Christ”. When he came up from the water it was like rising to new life and just as Jesus had given his life for others, in baptism we are called to a new life of love and service to others.

Listen to some words from the baptism service.
              “In baptism, God calls us out of darkness into his marvellous light.
               To follow Christ means dying to sin and rising to new life with him.”

It wasn’t an easy option being a Christian at the beginning of the church. You could be in severe trouble with the Jews and the Romans and in many parts of the world today Christians suffer persecution. In our gospel reading Jesus was both warning his followers about what might happen and also offering them some encouragement.
In the first part of the text we’re told three times not to be fearful. It might seem an impossible command to obey, given that the oppression towards Christians could be a matter of life and death and the commitment he asked for could cause serious divisions in a family. Jesus wasn’t advocating being reckless and throwing caution to the wind but he was challenging their priorities to put him first.
There is so much we might be fearful about at this time? Coronavirus has certainly challenged us – our health and that of our loved ones, the uncertainty of jobs and livelihoods, the extra worry faced by health workers and key workers, those in care homes, those who have missed their treatment, our children’s education and so much more.
Why does Jesus say, “Don’t be afraid”? It’s a command repeated again and again in the Bible. It’s natural that we are fearful, so how do we understand this? God wants us to depend on him. He wants us to share our feelings with him. We can tell him what we’re afraid of and ask him to help us. He doesn’t promise us that we will be free of troubles but listen again to what he does say from the Gospel. We’re very precious to God. He knows all about us. If we put our trust in Him, Jesus will acknowledge us before the Father in heaven. In John 14:27 Jesus also said, “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. I do not give as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not be afraid.”
In my teenage years I lived in Essex. My parents often took us out to the beautiful village of Dedham. In a corner of the church was a little poem by Elizabeth Cheney that we always looked for and which I’ll end my reflection with.
Said the Robin to the Sparrow
“I should really like to know,
Why these anxious human beings
Rush around and worry so?”
Said the Sparrow to the Robin,
“Friend I think that it must be
That they have no Heavenly Father
Such as cares for you and me.”

Please remember in your prayers.
The church, those who lead, teach, pray and sing.
The world, especially those area’s where there is fear, violence, mistrust, hunger and injustice.
The queen, who has just celebrated her official birthday.
All those in positions of power.
Our local schools, especially those in year 6, who this year cannot have the normal leavers service of celebration.
Those who are unwell, our NHS, teachers, those who are afraid and those who have huge financial worries.
Marjorie’s daughters as they prepare her funeral.

The Lord’s prayer.
Our Father, who art in Heaven, hallowed be thy name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in Heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.
For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, For ever and ever, Amen.

Notices.
1.Many of you will be pleased to know that I think I have found a safe solution to opening the church for private prayer, I am working on it now, so hopefully it will happen very soon.
2.In recent years, many of you have been very generous with donations to help with the cost of the bibles that we give as a gift from the church to those who leave Fishbourne primary each summer. This year, although we can’t hold the normal leavers assembly, we will still be giving each child a bible, inscribed with a special message from us. The cost of this is just over £300, if any of you would like to give a small donation towards this, please can you contact Robert Christie on: 01243 532642, who will let you know how to get it to him. Thank you in advance.

We end by singing.
You shall go out with joy
and be led forth with peace,
And the mountains and the hills
Shall break forth before you.
There’ll be shouts of joy,
And the trees of the field
Shall clap, shall clap their hands,
And the trees of the field shall clap their hands,
And the trees of the fields shall clap their hands,
And the trees of the fields shall clap their hands,
And you’ll go out with joy.

The Blessing.
The God of hope fill us with all joy and peace in believing,
And the Blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit be with us this day and always. Amen.

‘Happy Father’s Day to all the Dad’s today.’

Be at peace with yourself, the world and God, keep well and safe, and always be kind to one another.

Love and prayers, from Moira

 

The First Sunday after Trinity

(From Rev’d David Hider – Sunday 14th June 2020).

THANK YOU for joining this short act of worship.
We trust that you and those dear to you are keeping well.

As we consider our failures, come, let us return to the Lord and say:
O King enthroned on high,
filling the earth with your glory:
holy is your name,
Lord God almighty.
In our sinfulness we cry to you
to take our guilt away,
and to cleanse our lips to speak your word,
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

May the God of love bring us back to himself,
forgive us our sins, and assure us of his eternal love in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

We pray today’s Collect (Special Prayer)
O God,
the strength of all those who put their trust in you,
mercifully accept our prayers
and, because through the weakness of our mortal nature
we can do no good thing without you,
grant us the help of your grace,
that in the keeping of your commandments
we may please you both in will and deed;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the Letter to the Romans, chapter 5, verses 1 to 8
Therefore, since we are justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have obtained access to this grace in which we stand; and we boast in our hope of sharing the glory of God. And not only that, but we also boast in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit that has been given to us.

For while we were still weak, at the right time Christ died for the ungodly. Indeed, rarely will anyone die for a righteous person – though perhaps for a good person someone might actually dare to die. But God proves his love for us in that while we still were sinners Christ died for us.

The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter 9, verse 35 to chapter 10, verse 8
Then Jesus went about all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues, and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom, and curing every disease and every sickness. When he saw the crowds, he had compassion for them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd. Then he said to his disciples, “The harvest is plentiful, but the labourers are few; therefore ask the Lord of the harvest to send out labourers into his harvest.”

Then Jesus summoned his twelve disciples and gave them authority over unclean spirits, to cast them out, and to cure every disease and every sickness. These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon, also known as Peter, and his brother Andrew; James son of Zebedee, and his brother John; Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus; Simon the Cananaean, and Judas Iscariot, the one who betrayed him.

These twelve Jesus sent out with the following instructions: “Go nowhere among the Gentiles, and enter no town of the Samaritans, but go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. As you go, proclaim the good news, ‘The kingdom of heaven has come near.’ Cure the sick, raise the dead, cleanse the lepers, cast out demons. You received without payment; give without payment.

We reflect upon today’s Message
‘I just cannot (still) believe it!’ That, somehow, ‘the gods’ conspired to let Moira off from having to produce a message for Trinity Sunday – again! I thought that, this year, there would be no option. Had it been ‘normal times’, I would have been ministering elsewhere (I don’t think Moira registered the date when I asked for her agreement!) and, even with the current restrictions, by our agreed alternating system for producing the Sunday website message, it was still her turn. But, no! Not this time – again! I wonder what will happen on Sunday 30th May 2021?

Still shaking my head over this a few days on, I turned to this week’s lessons and recoiled. St Paul’s Letter to the Romans! How I find this literary offering so difficult! St Paul-speak and I do not marry well. Maybe, it’s the translation; maybe, it’s the punctuation or lack of it; maybe, it’s the scholarly approach which goes way above my head. Whatever it is, I try to avoid the writing if at all possible. But, I read the text anyway, hoping that some of St Paul’s wisdom will jump out for us to share in these still difficult times. Today’s text is the beginning of St Paul’s comparison of the two-sided reality of the Christian life. On the one hand, we are complete in Christ – that is, our acceptance with him is secure – while, on the other hand, we are growing in Christ – that is, we are becoming more and more like him. St Paul goes on to say that Jesus will usher us into the very presence of God, the King of Kings. And, when the door into his presence is opened, what we will find is grace – not condemnation, not vengeance, but the sheer undeserved, incredible kindness of God. Because of this, we can come to know the calm of depending, not on what we can do for ourselves, but on what God has done for us. Truly comforting, yet challenging.

But, it was the word ‘grace’ that jumped out and grabbed my full attention and it is this that I want to focus on as, I reckon, a good dollop of God’s grace is something that we definitely do need at present. After all, it was God’s grace that brought the world into being and it was God’s grace that brought order out of chaos and light out of darkness. In our current times, we need both these qualities, order and light. We need good leadership from all sources to bring order from our chaos and light from our darkness, particularly over the steps being taken to lift the lockdown from its restrictions. As I reflect, some of this new guidance seems to me to be communicated in St Paul-speak! For instance, at the time that I write (and rules may have changed since!), while observing social distancing and good hygiene practices, should my middle daughter visit us, she has to stay in the garden. We could share food and she could even use the indoor toilet under the same conditions. But, if it should rain, she cannot come indoors and has to go home. However, as a single parent through bereavement, she could come into the house, ignore social distancing and even stay overnight – had not her eldest child just had his eighteenth birthday. Yet, if we employed a cleaner, that non-family person could have the run of the house! I rest my case!

But, let us meander off at a tangent for a few moments. I wonder, just how did the Jewish people cope with some of the Psalms? Take Psalm 100, for instance, the set Psalm for today. Be bold, say it out loud and with expression!
O be joyful in the Lord, all ye lands:
serve the Lord with gladness, and come before his presence with a song.
Be ye sure that the Lord he is God:
it is he that hath made us, and not we ourselves;
we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.
O go your way into his gates with thanksgiving,
and into his courts with praise:
be thankful unto him, and speak good of his Name.
For the Lord is gracious, his mercy is everlasting:
and his truth endureth from generation to generation.
I have deliberately quoted the version from the Book of Common Prayer as it will be familiar to many of those who fondly remember Matins and Evensong. (If you should find this version difficult, please find another one from your Bible or the internet.) Psalm 100, the Jubilate Deo, sings out the glimmerings of the Gospel – that it does not matter who we are, for God made us and we can be happy about it. This is a poem which opened its arms as wide as all the Jewish people and included them. The Jews liked that. Then, the poem opened its arms still wider and included everybody else as well. I wonder, did those special people still like it quite so much? And, were they right to think this way – and why?

Do we – that is, you and I – need to take note and reckon with the fact that, since everybody is special to God because ‘he that hath made us’, nobody is more special than anybody else, and that, nevertheless, because God’s love is limitless, it does not matter one little bit? ‘God’s love has been poured into (all) our hearts,’ says St Paul. This surely has something to say about the inequalities of our present day society, subject to much protest at the moment. While coming to terms with this can dent our complacency a little, it can also warm our hearts and set us wonderfully free.

Yet, there is a danger in this. We can slip into the thought that God is somehow just there, a warm, reassuring safety net to life and that we can waltz to our own merry tune if we wish – but, he will always be there, imperturbably smiling to pick us up if things go wrong. I wonder if that is really so? Has this been the case during this period of worry, lockdown and restriction? Has God brought order out of your chaos and light out of your darkness, I wonder? I hope so. The way that this might happen is described in the opening of our New Testament reading, where, St Paul writing to the Christians in Rome, tells them that God has reached out to all the world and has made available in Jesus all that any man or woman may need to face life with integrity and to face God with peace. But, for us as it was for the Jews of St Paul’s time, if it is to be a help in our lives, we have to make it our own.

Many years ago, one of my daughters came running home from her friend’s house, through a rainstorm. She arrived home soaking wet – but carrying her raincoat. Her indignant defence against the inevitable telling off was that, at least, she had had her raincoat with her, when she could well have left it at home! Here is modern St Paul-speak if ever there was any – but, then, one of her names is Pauline! But, it wasn’t quite the point. She had been provided with an excellent raincoat, but even an excellent raincoat is useless if one does not wear it. This helps to make clear what is needed to translate the general call of St Paul to faith and make it personal – we have to ‘wear it’ against life’s storms, if you like. So, is our faith in God just a hope that he is there and that he will see us alright at the end? Or, is it a glad and day-by-day engagement of trust, response, reliance and quiet thankfulness? For, it is into this that God invites us. It is here that the Gospel becomes real for us. It is from here that we can step out and face anything that evil can throw at us. It is here that order comes from chaos and light from darkness. It is here that we can live God’s victory.

God loves each one of us so much and longs to be in a relationship with us just as a human father longs to be in a relationship with each of his children. It is not just that Jesus died for everyone. He died for you and for me. It is very personal. ‘It is no longer I who live, but it is Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me’ (Galatians 2:20). Just note that God values and loves each one of us so much that, if you or I had been the only person in the world, Jesus would have still died for us. Once we can see the Cross in these personal terms, our lives will be transformed. Chaos and darkness are banished; order and light become the new way of life. And, it is with this very thought – the transformation of our lives to live out God’s victory – that I recommend that you to take a moment to remind yourselves of Psalm 100 as a joyful response to these still difficult times. Rejoice in the fact that God values you (and me) and loves us so much that he gave Jesus to die for us. In return, the least we can do is to try to discover more about him so that we can learn to love him more and, with God’s grace, try to help bring order and light (and joy!) to those around us!

So, as we reflect, we pray:
Lord God, whose we are and whom we serve;
we place our lives afresh in your hands.
Take us as we are, and make us what you would have us to be;
and so fill us with your Holy Spirit that we may be strong for your service
and used wholly for your glory;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Please use these suggestions in your Prayers
Father God, we lift to you in prayer:
front-line staff within the NHS and all who support their work;
the residents and staff of our Care Homes;
any who are suffering from illness or who have been bereaved;
the people who bring food and essential supplies to our stores or doors;
the key workers in all areas that support our lives;
those working to develop a vaccine and using science to defeat coronavirus;
our Government, national and local, for wisdom and clarity of communication;
those planning a way out of lockdown to advise balanced risks;
the armed forces redeployed to various tasks within the nation;
our schools, businesses, transport systems, shops as they prepare to reopen;
for those pondering the challenges of returning to work or sending children to school;
for any known to us who, for any reason, need our prayers at this time;
for those who, through fear, are finding the release from restrictions difficult;
for Moira, churchwardens and others with responsibility for reopening our churches.

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Eternal Father,
we thank you for nourishing us with your many heavenly gifts:
may our togetherness strengthen us in faith,
build us up in hope,
and make us grow in love;
for the sake of Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Father God,
Hear our prayer for all whose lives are impoverished and beset
by the problems of the current time.
Guide those in central and local government,
including the decision-makers, the administrators, the planners,
to see the welfare of all the nation’s citizens as the highest priority.
Raise up in such areas men and women of integrity and energy
as leaders and educators to serve:
in industry and commerce, in health and social services,
in the emergency services, in all the work of industrial relations,
in the commitment to local communities.
This we ask for Jesus Christ’s sake. Amen.

God of truth,
help us to keep your law of love
and to walk in ways of wisdom,
that we may find true life
in Jesus Christ your Son;
and the blessing of God Almighty,
the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones,
this day and for evermore. Amen.

 
Trinity Sunday
(From Rev’d Canon Moira Wickens – Sunday 7th June 2020)
 

Good morning everyone, I hope you are all keeping well. Welcome to our service today.

Please say or sing:

Father, we adore you,
Lay our lives before you:
How we love you.

Jesus, we adore you,
Lay our lives before you:
How we love you.

Spirit, we adore you,
Lay our lives before you:
How we love you.

We say sorry to God.

In the wilderness we find your grace; you love us with an everlasting love.
Lord have mercy.

There is none but you to uphold our cause.
Christ have mercy.

Heal us, O Lord, and we shall be healed, restore us and we shall know your joy.
Lord have mercy.

May Almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life. Amen.

The Gloria, (tune, Ode to joy).

Glory be to God in Heaven,
Peace to those who love Him well;
On the earth let all His people
Speak His grace, His wonders tell:
Lord, we praise you for your glory,
Mighty Father, heaven’s king;
Hear our joyful adoration
And accept the thanks we bring.

The Collect (special) prayer.

Almighty and everlasting God,
You have given us your servants grace, by the confession of a true faith,
To acknowledge the glory of the eternal Trinity and in the power of the divine majesty, to worship the Unity;
Keep us steadfast in this faith, that we may evermore be defended from all adversities; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.

Today’s Readings:

2 Corinthians 13, 11-End
Matthew 28, 16-20

Reflection written by John Sheppard.

This is Trinity Sunday, perhaps one of the less well-known high spots of the Church Year.  Generally, our festivals (Christmas, Easter, Ascension etc.) remember particular events of the life of Jesus.  Trinity is unique in that it focuses instead on Christian doctrine. Don’t let that put you off, please keep reading!  

I’m sure it doesn’t need saying that we have all been going through difficult times, which seem likely to continue for weeks to come.  Some might say that it’s a strange moment to focus on the Trinity, the human view of the nature of God.  Perhaps though, thinking deeply about things which have passed us by before is a natural response to situations like the one we find ourselves in right now.  Could Trinity Sunday be just what we need?  

God is something we can never hope to fully understand.  If we did, would it still feel like God?  As Rowan Williams once said, perhaps we should “let God be God”.  But we were given enquiring minds, so working to increase our understanding and experience of God is natural.  The idea of the Trinity is designed to help us do this.  

So what’s it all about?  We start with God we read about in the Old Testament.  God involved in creation, setting up the patriarchs, encouraging people in those early times and doing everything to help them to behave properly.  All rather parental, God the Father.  Then comes God we experience on earth, in the form of Jesus Christ, living as a human being, sharing our experience, dying a human death to take away our sins, God the Son. Then there is God with us today.  Living in our hearts, sustaining us and revealed in some of the wonderful aspects of human nature brought out by lock-down.  An incredible force we call the Holy Spirit.  So there it is, Creator Father, Redeemer Son, and Sustainer Holy Spirit.  3 equal persons, one God.  A tiny step towards understanding that which is impossible to understand.          

Finally, it’s worth saying ideas about Trinity evolved in the centuries after the bible was written so it’s not directly mentioned.   Having said that, Paul, in the final verse of today’s first reading, came close with words familiar to us still.  The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all (2 Cor 13, 13).

Keep safe and God Bless

Please remember in your prayers.

The church, especially our own church families in Fishbourne and Apuldram.
Those who lead the nations of the world, may they be wise and courageous in the decisions they make.
For area’s of the world where there is unrest, fear, and anger.
All who are struggling from illness, with worry about the future, and financial concerns.
Our local schools as they continue to welcome children back.
Children who are struggling with the separation from their friends and their grandparents.
For those who are near the end of their earthly lives, and those who have recently died.

In a moment of quiet, do offer your own prayer of thanks for all the blessings you have received this last week. Amen.

Our Father, who art in Heaven, hallowed be thy name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.
For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory.
For ever and ever, Amen.

We say or sing a couple of verses of the hymn:

Holy, holy, holy; Lord God Almighty;
Early in the morning our song
Shall rise to thee;
Holy, holy, holy, merciful and mighty,
God in three persons, blessed Trinity.

Holy, holy, holy; Lord God Almighty,
All thy works shall praise thy name
In earth and sky and sea,
Holy, holy, holy, merciful and mighty,
God in three persons, blessed Trinity.

Almighty and eternal God,
You have revealed yourself as Father, Son and Holy Spirit,
And live and reign in the perfect unity of love;
Hold us firm in this faith,
That we may know you in all your ways,
and evermore rejoice in your eternal glory,
Who are three Persons yet one God, now and forever. Amen.

God the Holy Trinity make you strong in faith and love,
Defend you on every side, and guide you in truth and peace,
And the blessing of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit be upon you this day and in the days to come. Amen.

Go and be at peace, with God, your community and with yourself.

Just one more thing: For many years it has been a running joke that the Rector (Moira) delegates preaching on Trinity Sunday to somebody else. This year, when David and I worked out the rota, he was filled with disbelief that I had done it again, as Trinity would have been his week. I laughed.
But then, we re-checked the weeks and realised we had got it wrong. I in fact, would have to do Trinity Sunday, David laughed.

But wait for it, John then said he would like to do the reflection part now and again, so I sent him the upcoming dates, (all of them), and he chose the 7th June. Of course I agreed, and how I laughed.
David however, said ‘I don’t believe it’, ‘I don’t believe it’. ……….

 

 

Day of Pentecost

(From Rev’d David Hider – Sunday 31st May 2020).

THANK YOU for joining our short act of worship for the Day of Pentecost.

Alleluia! Christ is Risen. He is Risen indeed, alleluia!

As we consider our failures, come, let us return to the Lord and say:
Lord our God, in our sin we have avoided your call.
Our love for you is like a morning cloud, like the dew that goes away early.
Have mercy on us; deliver us from judgement; bind up our wounds and revive us;
in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

May the God of love bring us back to himself,
forgive us our sins, and assure us of his eternal love in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

[If you want to sing along to the Gloria below, the tune is Ode to Joy]
Glory be to God in heaven,
peace to those who love him well;
on the earth let all his people
speak his grace, his wonders tell:
Lord, we praise you for your glory,
mighty Father, heaven’s king;
hear our joyful adoration
and accept the thanks we bring.

Only Son of God the Father,
Lamb who takes our sin away,
now with God in triumph seated
for your mercy, Lord, we pray:
Jesus Christ, most high and holy,
Saviour, you are God alone
in the glory of the Father
with the Spirit: Three-in-One!

Today’s Collect (Special Prayer)
God, who as at this time taught the hearts of your faithful people
by sending to them the light of your Holy Spirit:
grant us by the same Spirit to have a right judgement in all things
and evermore to rejoice in his holy comfort;
through the merits of Christ Jesus our Saviour,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A Reading from the Acts of the Apostles, chapter 2, verses 1 to 21
When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.

Now there were devout Jews from every nation under heaven living in Jerusalem. And at this sound the crowd gathered and was bewildered, because each one heard them speaking in the native language of each. Amazed and astonished, they asked, “Are not all these who are speaking Galileans? And how is it that we hear, each of us, in our own native language? Parthians, Medes, Elamites, and residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya belonging to Cyrene, and visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, Cretans and Arabs – in our own languages we hear them speaking about God’s deeds of power.” All were amazed and perplexed, saying to one another, “What does this mean?” But others sneered and said, “They are filled with new wine.”

But Peter, standing with the eleven, raised his voice and addressed them, “Men of Judea and all who live in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and listen to what I say. Indeed, these are not drunk, as you suppose, for it is only nine o’clock in the morning. No, this is what was spoken through the prophet Joel:
‘In the last days it will be, God declares, that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh,
and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy,
and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams.
Even upon my slaves, both men and women, in those days I will pour out my Spirit;
and they shall prophesy.
And I will show portents in the heaven above and signs on the earth below,
blood, and fire, and smoky mist.
The sun shall be turned to darkness and the moon to blood,
before the coming of the Lord’s great and glorious day.
Then everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.’

The Gospel according to John, chapter 20, verses 19 to 23
When it was evening on that day, the first day of the week, and the doors of the house where the disciples had met were locked for fear of the Jews, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” After he said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples rejoiced when they saw the Lord. Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, so I send you.” When he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven them; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained.”

Today’s Message
Just what was the disciples’ state of mind as they waited in that Upper Room in accordance with Jesus’ instructions some ten days earlier – the same Upper Room that they had retreated to after Jesus’ crucifixion and where Jesus made his first two appearances, a week apart, after his resurrection? We are told, on these earlier occasions, that the disciples were afraid because they thought that they might be next on the hit list of the ruling Jewish hierarchy. Today’s episode is only about seven weeks later, not quite as long as the period of time that we have been in lockdown. Did the disciples still feel threatened? Had the Jews softened their stance? My guess is that fear was still a significant emotion among them as they waited and, if not because of the threat from the Jews, but because they did not know what they were waiting for.

It’s a bit like us really – there is a definite parallel here. Fear is a dominant quality among many people of these times. Even I admit to feeling fear. To give you an example, Janet likes a few solar lights to illuminate the border opposite the French doors as we sit in our lounge in the growing dark. Last year’s ones have refused to light and no matter how much faffing I put into them, nothing could persuade them to even glimmer. So, they had to go. Normally, in situations like this, my reaction would have been, at the first opportunity, to leap onto a 700 bus, alight at Fishbourne, walk out to Homebase, purchase replacements, reverse the journey and commission new lights. I’d expect to complete the whole task inside three hours, give or take the 700 bus timings. ‘Not worth the risk’, I decided. Fear! Why? Well, we have been fed a continuous media diet of: ‘If you go out, you will likely die or get very ill. Or you’ll likely cause someone else to do so. And, then, it’ll be your fault that someone in the NHS frontline will die or become ill. And, by the way, because we are ‘listening to the science’ over this, we know these things to be true!’ Yes, the slogan is snappier than this, but the meaning is the same. And, when that same authoritarian message is being pumped out, not just in official briefings, not just via the TV / radio news, not just across the Home Pages of tablet/computer/phone, but also craftily inserted amongst the advertisements of TV programmes, it is bound to have an impact. Even with the easing of some of the restrictions (which would make my trip to and from Homebase entirely possible), the message has changed to ‘the science tells us that the easing of the lockdown will cause a second spike of the virus which will be worse than the first.’ In a simplistic view, it’s brain-washing. People’s psyches have been imprinted with such a negative message, now not easily shaken off. Fear, I would suggest, seems to have become a dominant force in current human life, as I suspect it was for the disciples pre-Pentecost. [My fear, by the way, is that, should my venturing out to get something as trivial as solar lights cause Janet to get ill (or worse!), I could never forgive myself.] Fear! Paralytic fear. So, how do we move on from this? Let us take a look at today’s Bible texts.

But, first, as it is such a long time since we have been able to gather for worship, the sequence of events that we have missed out on goes like this:
Palm Sunday (April 5th): Jesus’ triumphant ride into Jerusalem.
Maundy Thursday (April 9th): Jesus’ call to be servants to each other and the institution of Holy Communion.
Good Friday (April 10th): Jesus was crucified at Passover time.
Easter Day (April 12th): Jesus’ Resurrection
Ascension Day (May 21st): Jesus ascended into heaven, forty days after his Resurrection.
Pentecost (today!): The Holy Spirit came fifty days after Passover, ten days after Jesus’ Ascension.
Pentecost is also called the Feast of Weeks and is one of three major Jewish feasts (Deuteronomy 16:16), a festival of thanksgiving for harvested crops. And, this is exactly why Jews of many nations were gathered together in Jerusalem when the events of today’s Bible reading from Acts took place. The Day of Pentecost was an occasion of celebration for all nations, all peoples. St Luke wrote (Acts) from his experience of travelling. He had seen the Gospel take root in amazingly-different cultures. He knew the Spirit’s power to touch people across the known world. There would be no boundaries in the future, no Jews and Gentiles, no slave and free, no babble of Babel – but, one language for all, a language which was Good News of great joy for all peoples (as the angels had sung at the beginning of his Gospel).

And, at this time, I suggest that this is exactly what we need to experience – joy. Joy to combat fear. The coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost signals:
a transforming power stopping us in our tracks, enabling us to get our life into order.
a resurrecting energy, bringing the new life of Christ into our deepest being.
a gentle breeze bringing comfort and security, confidence and light, offering gifts of reflection and understanding to what we experience.
God, vibrant and universal, going ahead of us to touch lives and situations beyond the boundaries of our knowledge.
God is ‘on the go’ – opening doors, creating opportunities, softening hearts, achieving break-throughs that we thought impossible. God’s Spirit is that persistent power which breaks down barriers and creates peace and justice where prejudice and fear have ruled the earth. Just the antidote to our experiences at the current time.

It is God’s nature to warn us ahead of time if something is coming up that he wants us seriously to attend to. The disciples had taken Jesus’ prophecy to heart – and, they waited watchfully and prayerfully for nine days following his Ascension. So often, we miss the outpouring of God’s Spirit in our lives because we are not expecting him to act. Yet, as soon as we set ourselves faithfully and expectantly to ask for it and wait for it, God honours the honesty of our longing and makes his presence known. So it was that, at that first Pentecost celebration, the force of the Holy Spirit came in great power, surging like wind and fire into the place where the disciples were expectantly waiting – and completely ‘drenched’ them in waves of God’s energising love. What this experience of the elements of God’s natural power did was to replace any fear and fill the disciples with excitement and joy – to go and tell others about Jesus and the way God loves us. The disciples went running out into the street telling the crowds that Jesus of Nazareth – who had been crucified – was the promised Messiah, the Christ, the Son of God. The result of all this activity was that many people came forward to be baptised to become followers of Jesus. The band of disciples grew from the one hundred and twenty (Acts 1:15) in the Upper Room by another three thousand (Acts 2:41)! The Church had been ‘born’ and, today, we celebrate its birthday.

Today, that same power of God’s Holy Spirit is still at work. It might be knocking on the door of your heart, my heart, asking us to throw away any fears which are weighing us down and replacing them with the love and joy of knowing Jesus. If we would allow him to invade our spirits, we, too, might be tempted to run into the streets to show people that we are followers of Jesus, though people would probably think that we are mad or drunk which was the experience of those first disciples (NB social-distancing might have to be observed for us to comply with the law!). And, we ought embrace the knowledge that – even in lockdown and restriction – the Holy Spirit might be rushing round ‘the Church’ at this very moment, challenging its members to go out into their local community to tell or show others about Jesus – in word and/or deed. Perhaps, we might just being asked to encourage someone we know to prepare for the commitment of baptism / confirmation which is the way the Church still works today (and will do in the future, though methods may have to change) to add to the number of those who are already part it (Acts 2:47). The question is: “Are you, am I, ready to abandon any fears that we might currently be feeling and accept the particular challenge of the ‘God-on-the-go’ to bring joy and excitement both into our own lives and into the lives of those around us?”

Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your people with the fire of your love.

Prayers
Please remember in your prayers:
front-line staff within the NHS and all who support their work;
any who are suffering from illness or struggling with the restrictions of daily life;
the residents and staff of our Care Homes;
the people who bring food and essential supplies to our stores or doors;
key workers in all areas that support our lives;
those working to develop a vaccine and to use science to defeat coronavirus;
our Government, national and local, and those planning a way out of lockdown;
the armed forces, especially those redeployed to various tasks within the nation;
our schools, businesses, transport systems, shops preparing to reopen;
for those pondering the challenges of returning to work or sending children to school;
for any known to us who our prayers at this time;
for those who fear that they might find the release and joy that Pentecost brings.

Father God, we thank you for all the good gifts around us
which add so much joy to our family lives:
for the sun which warms us and the air that gives us life;
for the loveliness of the natural world;
for the changing seasons, each in its beautiful order;
for our homes and families and friends;
for health of body and soundness of mind;
for music and books and works of art;
for the land of our birth, the land we love;
for the lives and examples of good and saintly souls.
Father God, for these manifold blessings and for all your love,
we give you heartfelt thanks; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Faithful God,
who fulfilled the promises of Easter
by sending us your Holy Spirit
and opening to every race and nation the way of life eternal:
open our lips by your Spirit,
that every tongue may tell of your glory;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Lord Jesus, we thank you that you have fulfilled your promise
and given us your Spirit to abide with us for ever:
grant us to know his presence in all its divine fullness.
May the fruit of the Spirit be growing continually in our lives;
may the gifts of the Spirit be distributed among us as he wills
to equip us for your service;
and may the power of the Spirit be so working in us
that the world around may increasingly come to believe in you.
We ask it, Lord, in your victorious name. Amen.

From Easter Day until today, we make this proclamation of Christ’s victory over death. This does not simply mean that Christ will live for ever, but that resurrection is for all who trust in him by faith. So, for the final time this season:

Alleluia! Christ is Risen. He is Risen indeed, alleluia!

Holy Spirit, sent by the Father,
ignite in us your holy fire;
strengthen your children with the gift of faith,
revive your Church with the breath of love,
and renew the face of the earth;
and the blessing of God Almighty,
the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and your loved ones,
this day and for evermore. Amen.

 

 

Sunday after Ascension Day.

(From Rev’d Canon Moira Wickens – 24th May 2020).

Good morning, and welcome to this short service.

We begin today by either singing or saying the following. As you do, accept that you really are, in your own homes, in the awesome presence of God.

Be still for the presence of the Lord,
The Holy One, is here,
Come, bow before Him now,
With reverence and fear.
In Him no sin is found,
We stand on Holy ground.
Be still, for the presence of the Lord,
The Holy One is here.
The Lord be with you:
Jesus said, “Before you offer your gift, go and be reconciled”. As brothers and sisters in God’s family we ask our Father for forgiveness.
In the wilderness we find your grace, you love us with an everlasting love:
Lord have mercy.
There is none but you to uphold our cause, our sin cries out and our guilt is great.
Christ, have mercy.
Heal us, O Lord, and we shall be healed, restore us and we shall know your joy.
Lord have mercy.
May almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life. Amen

Let us pray: This is a special prayer which you will be invited to use each day this week, more details after the readings.

Almighty God, your ascended Son has sent us into the world to preach the good news of your kingdom: inspire us with your spirit and fill our hearts with the fire of your love, that all who hear your Word may be drawn to you, through Christ our Lord. Amen

Readings: Acts 1 v.6-14 and John 17 v. 1-11.

Today, we find ourselves in between two very special events in the church year. On Thursday we celebrated the Ascension, and next Sunday is of course Pentecost, the birthday of the church.
So, instead of giving you just one reflection this morning, I would like to offer you a short reflection for each day this week, so that together we are ready and prepared to receive the life changing gift of the Holy Spirit next Sunday.

Each day, I invite you to begin with the special prayer at the start of this service, then reflect on the given subject, finishing with, ‘Come, Holy Spirit, Come’. Please don’t rush ahead to the next day, but enjoy being in the present moment each day of the week. You do not have to spend very long on each one, but please do take a moment at whatever time suits you.

Sunday 24th. God the creator.
We say the special prayer. Then: Our gospel reading today is part of the great prayer of Jesus, in it He assures us that He prays for us always. With this in mind, let us simply rest in God’s presence. Let us acknowledge just how much we are loved by the one who created all things. Let this love fill your hearts and your minds.

‘Come Holy Spirit, come’.

Monday 25th: We are unique.
We say the special prayer. Then: Yesterday we reflected on how much God loves us, today we pause to ponder that if God loves us then we must be quite nice people really. So today, as you take a few moments out from home schooling, housework or work, acknowledge to yourself that you are indeed a unique and special person. Think about the things that you are good at, think about the way you are made, and give thanks.

‘Come Holy Spirit, come’.

Tuesday 26th. The created world
We say the special prayer: Today we ponder on the created world, the world that we see in daylight hours and the world we see at night. Then, choose just one thing from outside that you really love. It may be a flower, a tree, a blade of grass, a bird, or even a little tiny bee or a star. Then simply pause long enough so that you become deeply aware of its beauty, its colour, texture and if a flower its perfume, wonder at its perfection. The created world, so awesome, so wonderful, created by God, continued to be cared for, by us.

‘Come Holy Spirit, come’.

Wednesday 27th. Our families.
We start with the special prayer. At some time during this day, let us sit for a moment and think about our families. Let us name them one by one; and acknowledge how much we miss them, and what they mean to us. Take time over this, as each name comes to mind, imagine their face, their laughter and their hugs.

‘Come Holy Spirit, come’.

Thursday 28th. Our friends.
Again, we say the special prayer. Our friends are those we choose to spend time with, during these last few weeks, despite phone calls we will have found ourselves missing our friends a great deal. Today, I invite you to give thanks for just 5 of your friends, and as you do, bring to mind why they are special, and let us all pray that we too can be a good friend to them.

‘Come Holy Spirit, come’.

Friday 29th. Letting go.
The special prayer. Today, we spend a short time letting go of past hurts that may be clogging up our hearts. Some we may not realise that they are still there. Letting go is not the same as forgetting, but it is really important that we do this. And so, as we sit for a few moments, let us bring to mind the people that have hurt us in our lives, either deliberately or unintentionally. We place the hurt before God, asking him to take them from us so that our hearts are ready for Him. On this day, we also acknowledge any worries, concerns, anxiety or even anger that we experience during this time. We remember that Jesus prays for us, every single moment of every day, and He knows our needs.

‘Come Holy Spirit, come’.

Saturday 30th. Be kind.
For the last time, we say the special prayer. The voice most of us listen to more than any other, is the voice in our own minds. The person we find most difficult to forgive, is ourselves. So today, Be kind to yourself. You are wonderfully made, yes, we all make mistakes and fall down, but God lifts us up, sets us on our feet, and encourages us to try again. The one who thinks they have never made a mistake is the one who makes the biggest mistake of all. Today, we pray for the courage to forgive ourselves, to be kind to ourselves, and then let us sit for a few moments in silence, before saying once more:

‘Come Holy Spirit, come’

Please remember in your prayers this week:

Our local school as they prepare for some of their children to return to lessons after half term.
For Naomi and all the staff.
For parents and children.
For those who feel lonely, anxious or worried about loved ones or their jobs.
We pray for the bereaved who may feel very alone at this time.
And let us give thanks for our community, the wonderful weather we have been able to enjoy, and for our family, friends and neighbours.
 
Our Father in heaven, Hallowed be your name, Your kingdom come,
Your will be done; on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.
For the kingdom, the power and the glory are yours, now and forever. Amen.

God has made us one in Christ, He has set His seal upon us and, as a pledge of what is to come, has given us the Spirit to dwell in our hearts.

The Peace of the Lord be always with you.

Notices.
As we continue to live a new ‘normal’ way of life, enormous thanks are given to the Fishbourne Volunteer Squad who continue to be available to shop, or collect prescriptions for those who need a little bit of help during this time. Please do not hesitate to call them, there are about 100 willing folks in this team, so no one is being a burden.

If you have some photo’s, or would like to write about what you have been doing during these last weeks, do send them to Alan, it really would be lovely to hear some news from more of you.

Finally, Happy Birthday to Janet Hider who celebrates her ??th birthday on Friday.

Let us pray:
Eternal God, giver of love and power, your Son Jesus Christ has sent us into all the world to preach the gospel of His kingdom; confirm us in this mission, and help us to live the good news we proclaim, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Blessing
The Spirit of Truth lead us into all truth, give us grace to confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, and strengthen us to proclaim the word and works of God. And the blessing of God almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit be with us all today and always. Amen.

Be at peace, stay safe, and hang on in there, we will meet again, this time will not last forever. Love and prayers to you all, from Moira.

Ascension Day. (From Rev’d David Hider – 21st May 2020)

Thank you for joining us in this short act of worship for Ascension Day.

Alleluia! Christ is Risen. He is Risen indeed, alleluia!

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ, for forty days we have been celebrating with joyful hearts the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ, his bursting from the tomb and his defeat of the power of sin and death. He appeared to his disciples many times and told them about the Kingdom of God. Today, we recall how he left this earth and returned to his Father, ascending into heaven to take his throne over all dominions and powers. Trusting in his reign over all creation, and submitting to his kingly yet loving rule, let us hear again the story of his parting.

But, first, let us pause to bring before God any failures which we now regret:
Lord Jesus, you suffered a cruel death on the cross for our redemption,
yet we have forgotten your pain and stayed in the realm of the evil you defeated.
Lord, have mercy.

Lord Jesus, you were raised from death to bring us new life,
yet we have preferred the comfort of the familiar,
and the empty promises of a sinful world.
Christ, have mercy.

Lord Jesus, you have ascended to your Father and our Father, your God and our God;
plead there at the right hand of God
for our forgiveness and entry into the fullness of his presence.
Lord, have mercy.

May the God of love bring us back to himself,
forgive us our sins, and assure us of his eternal love in Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

Today’s Collect (Special Prayer)
Grant, we pray, almighty God,
that as we believe your only-begotten Son our Lord Jesus Christ
to have ascended into the heavens, so we in heart and mind may also ascend
and with him continually dwell;
who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

A reading from the Acts of the Apostles, chapter 1, verses1 to 11
In the first book, Theophilus, I wrote about all that Jesus did and taught from the beginning until the day when he was taken up to heaven, after giving instructions through the Holy Spirit to the apostles whom he had chosen. After his suffering he presented himself alive to them by many convincing proofs, appearing to them during forty days and speaking about the kingdom of God. While staying with them, he ordered them not to leave Jerusalem, but to wait there for the promise of the Father. “This,” he said, “is what you have heard from me; for John baptized with water, but you will be baptized with the Holy Spirit not many days from now.” So when they had come together, they asked him, “Lord, is this the time when you will restore the kingdom to Israel?” He replied, “It is not for you to know the times or periods that the Father has set by his own authority. But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” When he had said this, as they were watching, he was lifted up, and a cloud took him out of their sight. While he was going and they were gazing up toward heaven, suddenly two men in white robes stood by them. They said, “Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking up toward heaven? This Jesus, who has been taken up from you into heaven, will come in the same way as you saw him go into heaven.”

A reading from the Gospel according to Luke, chapter 24, verses 44 to 53
Then Jesus said to them, “These are my words that I spoke to you while I was still with you – that everything written about me in the law of Moses, the prophets, and the psalms must be fulfilled.” Then he opened their minds to understand the scriptures, and he said to them, “Thus it is written, that the Messiah is to suffer and to rise from the dead on the third day, and that repentance and forgiveness of sins is to be proclaimed in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. You are witnesses of these things. And see, I am sending upon you what my Father promised; so stay here in the city until you have been clothed with power from on high.” Then he led them out as far as Bethany, and, lifting up his hands, he blessed them. While he was blessing them, he withdrew from them and was carried up into heaven. And they worshiped him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy; and they were continually in the temple blessing God.

Today’s Message
As the vicar designate, I approached the door of the Church of the Ascension at Peacehaven for the first time, I noticed, right at the top of the concrete pillars on each side, part of a human foot disappearing into a cloud. It was an image that could have been drawn by a six-year-old at a Sunday School lesson and, once seen, could not be unseen during the fifteen or so years as the incumbent there. ‘Jesus was lifted up, and a cloud took him out of their sight’ must have been the text for that lesson. Yet, those images summed up for me, a modern-day Christian, that the Ascension story must be something of a test case – a test case for our ability to cope with the antique outlook of the ancient view of the universe that we find in the Bible. For many, including myself, it is difficult to understand the story of the Ascension in our modern, space-age time. The Bible uses the language of ‘taken up’ or ‘up there’, assuming the antique view of the world as a kind of three-decker sandwich:
heaven above,
earth, here in the middle,
and hell down below
– all within easy reach of each other, a cosy universe and, of course, entirely man-centred. However, in our day of space travel, of men on the moon, of telescopes and radio telescopes probing away into the vastness of the universe, we have a very different world picture. We know that our earth is simply a tiny speck in an immense vastness. We know it is not the centre of the universe – but, with apologies to any real scientists reading this, earth is a third-rate planet of a fourth-rate insignificant star on one of the remote fringes of a great galaxy – which itself only one of a huge army of galaxies that extends away and away into infinity. No longer can we believe, comfortingly, in the earth as the mid-point around which all else revolves – and, nor can we believe any more that the stars are bright pinholes in the floor of heaven above. So, we are forced, to ask ourselves what can we make of the Ascension story? What is it really about? What was, or is, the Ascension?

Firstly, the Ascension is not an account of a movement in space. The difference between an astronaut and Jesus Christ is that the astronaut comes back to earth at an appointed man-decided time, while the date and the time of Jesus’ return is known only to the Father in heaven. Secondly, the Ascension story is not describing a moment in time, a specific event which happened at a specific moment of time on the fortieth day after the Resurrection which is how the Church Calendar still represents it. Yet, our knowledge that the earth is round, a small speck in the vast universe, when added to the fact that God is a spiritual Being, means that we are not easily able to see Christ’s ascent as the start of a journey in the physical sense, just as our ancestors did.

But, all this does not lessen our belief that Jesus was rejoining his heavenly Father. There can be no doubt that the first disciples thought that Christ’s return would be soon – and, it was very natural that they should do so with the limited knowledge of the universe that they had. Indeed, with such expectation, some of them were affected in their attitude to daily life and they neglected routine duties. In others, feelings of disappointment – and, even of doubt – arose when they waited in vain. We should accept the fact that the time of our Lord’s return is something God does not mean us to know – and may be long delayed. For some Christians, this has resulted in their putting it out of their minds – or, at best, assuming that it is not likely to be in their earthly lifetime. So, if our belief is that Jesus was rejoining his heavenly Father, where did he go? St Luke tells us: ‘Up into heaven’. How did he go? St Luke says: ‘He was taken up, and a cloud hid him from view’. I submit that this is all God intends that we need to know. But, still, there are those who argue interminably about the logistics of the Ascension. It might be my failing, but I believe that the Ascension cannot be explained logically, reasonably or common-sensibly. Yet, we believe St Luke when he tells us how Jesus was crucified, dead and buried – and, how he rose from the dead. So, why should St Luke be any less believable when he goes on to tell us about the Ascension? Or, somehow, do we think that, with the Ascension story, St Luke is being inconsistent and losing his perspective of the events of that time?

We know that all the information that we hear and read is fed into these wonderfully articulate and muscular minds that God has given to us. We digest the data, interpreting and understanding according to our capacity, or our mood of the moment. Usually the healthier and happier we are – both physically and spiritually – the less sceptical we are. There is recorded the following inscription:
There is an old Christian tradition,
that God sends each person into this world
with a special message to deliver,
with a special song to sing for others,
with a special act of love to bestow.
No-one else can speak that message,
or sing that song,
or offer that act of love.
These are entrusted only to that one
very special person.
I like to believe that these words, as well as describing you and me, are also applicable to St Luke. A scholar, doctor, artist, missionary and author, Luke knew how to glean his data, sift his information, and write accordingly, in nicely manicured Greek, not wasting words, yet presenting an account comprehensible to a wide range of readers. The fact that Luke saw fit to record the Ascension twice – once in his Gospel and once in the Acts of the Apostles – is surely a measure of the importance that he and his source(s) attached to it. When Jesus ascended back to his Father, it did not really matter how, or even where, he went. He returned to glory – freeing the Holy Spirit for mission on earth, to live in the hearts of Christians the world over.
God the Father was not coming.
Jesus the Son had done his work.
So, the Spirit had to come (more of that another time).
And, we have Luke’s record in Acts that at the ‘end of the world’ – when the Spirit has finished his work – Jesus will return, as he left. What does it matter if we do not understand it? It will happen, whether we do or not!

Prayers
Please remember in your prayers:
front-line staff within the NHS and all who support their work;
any who are suffering from illness or struggling with the restrictions of daily life;
the residents and staff of our Care Homes;
the people who bring food and essential supplies to our stores or doors;
key workers in all areas that support our lives;
those working to develop a vaccine and to use science to defeat coronavirus;
our Government, national and local, and those planning a way out of lockdown;
the armed forces, especially those redeployed to various tasks within the nation;
our schools, businesses, transport systems, shops preparing to reopen;
Moira, the Churchwardens and PCC Members as they try to work out, when allowed, how best to re-awaken our Churches for people to gather again.

Jesus, our ascended and exalted Lord,
to whom has been given the name above all names:
we worship and adore you.
Jesus, King of righteousness, King of peace,
enthroned on the right hand of the Majesty on high:
we worship and adore you.
Jesus, our great High Priest, our Advocate with the Father,
who lives for ever to make intercession for us:
we worship and adore you.
Jesus, the Pioneer of our salvation,
bringing many to glory through your passion:
we worship and adore you.
To him who sits on the throne and to the Lamb,
be praise and honour, glory and power,
For ever and ever. Amen.

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

God our Father,
you have raised our humanity in Christ
and have fed us with the bread of heaven:
mercifully grant that, nourished with such spiritual blessings,
we may set our hearts in the heavenly places;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Alleluia! Christ is Risen. He is Risen indeed, alleluia!

Risen Christ,
you have raised our human nature to the throne of heaven:
help us to seek and serve you,
that we may join you at the Father’s side,
where you reign with the Spirit in glory,
now and for ever;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit,
be among you this day and for evermore. Amen.

 
 
Sixth Sunday after Easter. (From Rev David Hider – 17th May 2020)

WELCOME to this short act of worship. Thank you for joining in with us all.

Alleluia! Christ is Risen. He is Risen indeed, alleluia!

Lord Jesus, you raise us to new life.
Lord, have mercy.

Lord Jesus, you forgive us our sins.
Christ, have mercy.

Lord Jesus, you feed us with the living bread.
Lord, have mercy.

May the God of love and power forgive us and free us from our sins,
heal and strengthen us by his Spirit, and raise us to new life in Christ our Lord. Amen.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

Today’s Collect (Special Prayer)

God our redeemer,
you have delivered us from the power of darkness
and brought us into the kingdom of your Son:
grant, that as by his death he has recalled us to life,
so by his continual presence in us he may raise us
to eternal joy;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.     

New Testament Reading: Acts 17:22-31;

Then, Paul stood in front of the Areopagus and said, “Athenians, I see how extremely religious you are in every way. For as I went through the city and looked carefully at the objects of your worship, I found among them an altar with the inscription, ‘To an unknown god.’ What therefore you worship as unknown, this I proclaim to you. The God who made the world and everything in it, he who is Lord of heaven and earth, does not live in shrines made by human hands, nor is he served by human hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all mortals life and breath and all things. From one ancestor, he made all nations to inhabit the whole earth, and he allotted the times of their existence and the boundaries of the places where they would live, so that they would search for God and perhaps grope for him and find him – though indeed he is not far from each one of us. For ‘In him we live and move and have our being’; as even some of your own poets have said, ‘For we too are his offspring.’ Since we are God’s offspring, we ought not to think that the deity is like gold, or silver, or stone, an image formed by the art and imagination of mortals. While God has overlooked the times of human ignorance, now he commands all people everywhere to repent, because he has fixed a day on which he will have the world judged in righteousness by a man whom he has appointed, and of this he has given assurance to all by raising him from the dead.”

Gospel Reading: John 14:15-21

Jesus says: “If you love me, you will keep my commandments. And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Advocate, to be with you forever. This is the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it neither sees him nor knows him. You know him, because he abides with you, and he will be in you. “I will not leave you orphaned; I am coming to you. In a little while the world will no longer see me, but you will see me; because I live, you also will live. On that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you. They who have my commandments and keep them are those who love me; and those who love me will be loved by my Father, and I will love them and reveal myself to them.”

Today’s Message

Can you calculate the value of ‘x’ from the equation 2x+3=x+10? Now, don’t roll your eyes upwards and say that you cannot understand things like this. Surely, it is much easier to solve this very simple algebraic equation than to understand the new interpretations on social mixing where, apparently, one can invite a cleaner (or child nanny) from outside your household to come into your home, but not a relative (or friend). Or one can meet with one other person from outside your household in a public space, but not in your garden. Anyway, the answer to the algebraic sum is at the end of the article. But, the answers to the other conundrums …?

Deriving the answer to the above equation is a bit like explaining to people who God is. ‘What therefore you worship as unknown’ as St Paul said to the Athenians. It is as if people call God ‘x’, the unknown. We solve our mathematical ‘x’ mystery by working through, step by step, gradually getting a clearer idea of the value of ‘x’. In the end, it becomes quite clear to us. Similarly, as we take the newly-granted extension to our exercise regime during this period of restriction, we can extend the range of our travels to look closer at the beauty and order of our world – all the physics and chemistry of it, all the variety and colour and shape and sounds in it – and, in so doing, begin to work our way towards discovering what God is like. The sheer wonder of creation means that we can work out that God must be clever and thoughtful, and imaginative and faithful. ‘The God who made the world and everything in it, he who is Lord of heaven and earth,’ says St Paul as he continued his address to the Athenian audience. But, the Good News for us is that Jesus, by coming to earth and living among us, shows us exactly what God is like. We can now actually see who God is.

With Jesus’ life there in front of us through our reading of the Gospel texts and through trying to live in his company every day, we can build a very clear idea of what God is like. We can see:
that God is forgiving and totally honest and good;
that God is responsible and stands up for what is right (whatever happens to him and however much people sneer);
that God looks for the good in people and does not condemn them or give up on them;
that God’s love has been proved stronger than death.
If we put our faith in this God, whom Jesus has revealed to us in a new and clear way – and, if we claim to love him – then, as our Gospel text tells us, we will have to start doing as he says. In other words, be obedient to him by keeping his commandments!

In saying this, I wonder how many of us find it easy to be obedient? If you are anything like me, my guess is that most of us would admit to finding it very hard. Simply, we do not want to do what we are told – we want to do what we choose! I am sure that this is why ‘fear’ has been employed to ensure that we keep to the rules of the lockdown. However, Jesus says that the way we can tell if someone really does believe in him and love him is by whether they are obedient to him and obey what he says. Take the armed forces where everyone has to obey orders. One example is that to drill by marching and parading helps the soldiers get used to doing what they are told straight away. It just would not work, where there are guns and explosives around, to have soldiers who were not disciplined. Obedience, for such Services’ personnel and for others, could be a matter of life or death.

But, Jesus cannot use us as his soldiers in the battle against evil unless we are trained to obey him – in the same way that good soldiers obey their commanders. Jesus told his followers this: ‘If you love me, you will do the things I command. The one who knows my commands and obeys them is the one who loves me.’ But, Jesus is not getting hold of us in a half-Nelson and saying: ‘Now listen you, obey me or else!’ He would never, ever want to force us to do anything. He respects us too much for that. However, he is saying: ‘OK, you say that you love me and trust me as your Lord. If you really mean this, you would be doing what I told you out of love and respect for me. If you just go on pleasing yourself and doing what you want all the time, it shows that you do not really love me at all.’ If we are honest and think about it, he is right – and we cannot get away from it. If we do mean it when we say we love and trust Jesus – then, we will have to get in training to be more obedient. Here, we would do well to recall words said at the Baptism Service: ‘Fight valiantly under the banner of Christ against sin, the world and the devil, and continue his faithful soldier and servant to the end of your life.’ This means listening to God and saying ‘yes’ to him – whether it is what we want to do, or not. Make no mistake, this is a very hard thing to learn. But, it is worth learning because, being friends with Jesus, is the best and happiest thing that could ever happen to us. And, to be friends with Jesus, there are only two rules: ‘Love him’ and ‘Obey his commands’. It couldn’t be simpler.

N.B.    Answer to the algebraic equation: 2x+3=x+10.
           Take ‘3’ from each side gives: 2x+(3-3)=x+(10-3), i.e. 2x=x+7.
           Take ’x’ from each side gives: 2x-x=(x-x)+7, i.e. x=7.
Simples!!!

Prayers

Please remember in your prayers:
front-line staff within the NHS and all who support their work;
any who are suffering from illness or struggling with the restrictions of daily life;
the residents and staff of our Care Homes;
the people who bring food and essential supplies to our stores or doors;
key workers in all areas that support our lives;
those working to develop a vaccine and to use science to defeat coronavirus;
our Government, national and local, and those planning a way out of lockdown;
the armed forces, especially those redeployed to various tasks within the nation;
our schools, businesses, transport systems, shops preparing to reopen;
for those pondering the challenges of returning to work or sending children to school;
for any known to us who need our prayers at this time.

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.     
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.  
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.  
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

God our Father,
whose Son Jesus Christ gives the water of eternal life:
may we thirst for you, the spring of life and source of goodness,
through him who is alive and reigns, now and for ever. Amen.

Alleluia! Christ is Risen. He is Risen indeed, alleluia!

Risen Christ,
by the lakeside you renewed your call to your disciples:
help your Church to obey your command
and draw the nations to the fire of your love, to the glory of God the Father;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit,
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

PS    If, like me, you’re becoming a little confused about what day of the week it is (or even the date!), you might have missed the fact that Christian Aid Week has just finished. However, I am sure that they would still welcome a donation. This can easily be done via their website:

 

 

Fifth Sunday of Easter.

Alleluia Christ is risen.
He is risen indeed, Alleluia.

Good morning everyone. I hope you are all keeping safe and well.
Let’s worship God together.

God, be gracious to us and bless us, and make your face shine upon us.
Lord, Have mercy.

May your ways be known on the earth, your saving power among the nations.
Christ, have mercy.

You, Lord, have made known your salvation, and reveal your justice in the world.
Lord have mercy.

May the God of Love and power forgive us and free us from our sins, heal and strengthen us by His Spirit, and raise us to new life in Christ our Lord. Amen.

Glory to God, Glory to God, Glory to the Father, (repeat)
Glory to God, Glory to God, son of the Father, (repeat)
Glory to God, Glory to God, glory to the spirit. (repeat)

To God be glory for ever, To God be glory for ever.

Alleluia Amen, Alleluia Amen, Alleluia Amen.

Today’s special prayer.

Almighty God, who through your only-begotten Son Jesus Christ have overcome death, and opened to us the gate of everlasting life; grant that, as by your grace going before us you put into our minds good desires, so by your continual help we may bring them to good effect, through Jesus Christ our risen Lord, who is alive and reigns with you, now and forever. Amen.

Readings: Acts 7 v 55-60 and John 14 v 1-14.

Reflection:

Jesus said, “do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid”.
Those words at the beginning of our Gospel reading are very challenging, especially when they follow the first reading set for today which tells us about the stoning of Stephen. It’s almost as if Jesus is saying, “don’t panic, trust in me, it will be OK”.
And that surely is easier said than done, especially when life is painful.
It goes without saying that the heart can become profoundly troubled, and when the heart is troubled nothing seems right. And we’ve all been there at different times of our lives, some of us may be there right now.

Where we would normally go about our daily life with a certain eagerness and excitement, when our hearts are troubled, there’s a sense of fear that seems to overshadow almost everything, and there’s no escaping it until our hearts are at peace again.
So what do we do when we are troubled to the very depths of our souls, when we don’t even know if God is with us during those times.

There are many in the world today whose hearts are very troubled, filled with fear, worry, anxiety, perhaps even despair. Not one of us has ever experienced a global pandemic before, and so it is not surprising that so many feel uncertain and concerned about the future. And yet within this, the words of Jesus stand firm and true, we can be assured that we are not alone, that God is with us every step of the way, this time will come to an end.

We need to remember where and when Jesus spoke those words of encouragement. He was in the upper room with his disciples, enjoying a meal, having a bit of a party, just before heading out to the garden of Gethsemane, where he would be betrayed, arrested, flogged and crucified. He’d already told them that Peter would deny him 3 times and that Judas would betray him. Yet despite all that was to happen, he simply told them not to let their hearts be troubled or afraid, no matter what happens he said, trust in God.

Now this is not just a bit of comforting advice from Jesus, it is in fact a command, albeit a very strange command. Those words form the very basis of Jesus’ ‘sermon’ to his disciples which carries on right through chapters 14,15,16 and 17. It is a sermon in which Jesus gives His disciples, and us, reason after reason to believe in God, so that even when we hit rock bottom, our hearts will not be completely afraid.

He never gives us a preview of all the difficult moments that will come into our lives, but just as he did for his first disciples, he does for us to this very day. We must always remember that Jesus has promised that He will sustain us through every single one of them.
And like Peter, it doesn’t mean we will never make a mistake, or that our faith will never waiver, but it does mean that in the end, everything will get worked out.
No matter what happens in our own life, no matter what happens in the world, we need to hold on to the great truth, that Jesus is the way, the truth and the life.
And further on in chapter 14 he gives us this awesome gift,
“Peace I bequeath to you, my own peace I give you, a peace the world cannot give, this is my gift to you, do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid. So may we all be strengthened, encouraged and trustful. Amen.

This week we continue to pray for:

Our NHS staff and all front line workers.
All those who have volunteered to help others at this time.
Our local school, Naomi, the staff and the children of key workers. Let us remember families who are struggling financially.
For those who are finding this time difficult, the lonely, the bereaved, the anxious and the fearful.
We pray for our grand children and families.
For one another, our friends and neighbours.
And let us give thanks for those who give us a reason to smile, for those who are there for us and for those who help us to see the beauty in the created world.

Notices: With heavy hearts it has been decided to postpone this year’s Church and School Fete until next year. But be on the alert, Mike will be back, rounding up all you wonderful helpers.

The church has recently paid for some very special books for our local school, these books are to help any of the children who may be feeling worried or anxious during this time. The books are available for families to borrow, and I too have a set which can also be borrowed by any of you.

What a great day Friday turned out to be, so very different to what was planned, but as always, the people of this country rose to the challenge in the most spectacular ways.

If you wish to, let us sing:

This little light of mine, I’m gonna let it shine,
This little light of mine, I’m gonna let it shine,
This little light of mine, I’m gonna let it shine,
Let it shine, let it shine, let it shine.

Final prayer and Blessing.

Eternal God, whose Son Jesus Christ is the Way, the Truth and the Life, grant us to walk in His way, to rejoice in His truth, and to share His risen life, who is alive and reigns, now and forever. Amen.

May the Father from whom every family on earth and in heaven receives its name, strengthen us with His spirit in our inner being, so that Christ may dwell in our hearts by Faith. And the Blessing of God Almighty, the Father, Son and Holy Spirit be with us all. Amen.

Be at peace, Do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid. Love and prayers from Moira

 

 

Many of you will have been aware that plans were being put in place for a great community event on this day. Obviously this can’t go ahead now, and so I offer you this service to use as you wish.

V.E. Day. 8th May 2020. A short Act of Remembrance.

Jesus said: “ Greater love has no one than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends”. John 15 v13.
“This is my commandment, Love each other”. v.17.

Let us pray.
Lord God our Father, we pledge ourselves to serve you and all humankind, in the cause of peace, and for the relief of want and suffering, and to the praise of your name. Guide us by your spirit, give us wisdom, courage and Hope, and keep us faithful, now and always, Amen.

If you like, you could now sing:,
Make me a channel of your peace, where there is hatred, let me bring your love, where there is injury, your pardon Lord, and where there’s doubt, true faith in you.

O master, grant that I may never seek, so much to be consoled as to console, to be understood, as to understand, to be loved as to love with all my soul.

Act of Remembrance.

They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old. Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn, from the going down of the sun, and in the morning, We will remember them.

A time of silence. You may wish to light a candle to help you focus.
Then we say:
I believe in the sun, even when it does not shine.
I believe in love, even when I cannot feel it,
I believe in God, even when He is silent.

If you are able to, we stand to sing:

God save our gracious Queen, long live our noble queen, God save the queen. Send her victorious, happy and glorious, long to reign over us, God save the queen.

Let us pray.
Let us give thanks for the selfless and courageous service and sacrifice of those who brought peace to Europe, and for the good example they have given to us.
We pray for nations still devastated by war, for those who suffer the effects of past wars and for all innocent victims whose lives have been shattered by the cruelty of others.
As we pray for all world leaders, let us remember those who this day will lay down their lives for the good of others, we pray for the weary, the lost and for those who have lost hope, may they glimpse God’s love through the actions and words of others.
We pray for the young people of our own day and for all who will shape the future of this nation and the nations of the world, may they be inspired by those who have gone before them to serve as they have been served.

The Lord’s prayer.

Blessing.

May the road rise up to meet you, the wind be always at your back. the sun shine warm upon your face, the rains fall gently on your fields, and, until we meet again, May God hold you, in the Palm of His hand. Amen.
Finally, a couple of things to sing during this day as you celebrate in your own homes and gardens, we may be physically apart, but we are together in spirit.

We’ll meet again.

We’ll meet again, don’t know where, don’t know when,
But I know we’ll meet again some sunny day.
Keep smiling through, just like you always do, til the blue skies drive the dark clouds far away.

So will you please say “hello”,
To the folks that I know?
Tell them I won’t be long,They’ll be happy to know.
That as you saw me go, I was singing this song.

We’ll meet again……………………………………..

You’ll never walk alone.

When you walk through a storm,
Hold your head up high,
And don’t be afraid of the dark,

At the end of a storm,
There’s a golden sky,
And the sweet silver song of a lark.

Walk on through the wind,
walk on through the rain, though your dreams be tossed and blown,

Walk on, walk on,
With Hope in your heart,
And you’ll never walk alone,
You’ll never walk alone.

May God Bless you all, and may the souls of those who have died in recent weeks rest in peace.

 

The Fourth Sunday of Easter. (From Rev David Hider – 3rd May 2020)

Alleluia! Christ is Risen. He is Risen indeed, alleluia!

Lord Jesus, you suffered a cruel death on the cross for our redemption,
yet we have forgotten your pain and stayed in the realm of the evil you defeated.
Lord, have mercy.

Lord Jesus, you were raised from death to bring us new life,
yet we have preferred the comfort of the familiar,
and the empty promises of a sinful world.
Christ, have mercy.

Lord Jesus, you have ascended to your Father and our Father,

your God and our God;
plead there at the right hand of God
for our forgiveness and entry into the fullness of his presence.
Lord, have mercy.

May the God of love and power forgive us and free us from our sins,
heal and strengthen us by his Spirit, and raise us to new life in Christ our Lord. Amen.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

Today’s Collect (Special Prayer)
Almighty God,
whose Son Jesus Christ is the resurrection and the life:
raise us, who trust in him,
from the death of sin to the life of righteousness,
that we may seek those things which are above,
where he reigns with you
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Readings: Acts 2:42-47; John 10:1-10

Today’s Message
There are shepherds and there are shepherds – and, it matters which kind we have. Jesus was the One who pointed this out. There are thieves out there who are masquerading as shepherds who are ready to do violence for their own ends – and there are hirelings out there who are masquerading as shepherds, who do not care what happens to the sheep so long as they get their wages. Neither of these will do. However, we do have a Good Shepherd who will lay down his life for us, if necessary, to protect us. He leads us to green pastures and still waters – and we love him for his gentleness. But, underneath the gentleness, is a will of iron. Nobody, but nobody, will take us from his care. We are absolutely secure. This does not mean that nothing bad will ever happen to us. It means that, even when the worst the world can do is happening, we are still totally safe. Nothing can take us from him. Surely, this is something to hang on to as we struggle to cope with coronavirus, the lockdown and its long-lasting future effect on our daily lives.

At the same time, the tyrants of the world may continue to strut around like they own the place – but, their time will pass. Much of what goes on out there in the world is just bluster. We spend so much time and energy proving things. But, to whom? To the people around us? More often, it is just to ourselves. And, nearly always, these are things that never needed proving in the first place – not if we believe in a God who knows. In normal times, we hurry, hurry, hurry to get someplace and, having got there, wait anxiously until it is time to hurry someplace else – and, often spend whole days and weeks never actually having been anywhere. We need take one step back from all that frantic importance to learn what is important in life and not let ourselves get hooked on any of the rest. And, now, in this time of restriction, is a good opportunity to do just this.

In the face of the world’s pain at this time of pandemic – and not forgetting (as we seem, conveniently, to have done) the places in the world where hunger rages, disease rampages and conflict dominates – what is really needed are people who are focused, calm, alert, open.
People who listen.
People who have dealt with the anger inside themselves.
People who know they are loved.
People who breathe deeply of greenness, who drink deeply of still waters, until greenness and stillness become gifts they themselves can offer to the world.

So, here is an invitation. Here, in our often too-busy lives, there is a calling that I think we sometimes miss – a calling just to be. Our spirits need it for themselves – to bring recovery and renewing and refreshment. But, more than that, the world also needs it from us. In this sense, to be serene is to be prophetic.
It is to call the world’s bluff, when forces out there try to whip us into some new frenzy or panic.
It is to witness in word and deed to the reality and presence of God in Jesus Christ.
It is faith, founded not on sweetness and light and all the things one sees through rose-tinted spectacles – but, on a world literally made new by the death and resurrection of Christ.

Recall what Jesus said to Peter, by that lakeside in Galilee, after he had risen from the dead. “Do you love me, Peter?” he asked. “Then feed my sheep.” (John 21:17) In other words: ‘Do you appreciate what I have done and been for you? Then, go out and be a shepherd yourself. Green pastures. Still waters. Give them to the world in its need. Do it in my name.’ And, today, Jesus invites us – that is, you and me – to do just the same. As Moira said last week: “although it may seem that we can’t ‘be’ there for others, actually we can, just in a different way.” So, go on and ‘phone a friend’ (as the TV Game Show suggested), or send an email / use social media / post a card / write a letter to someone who might need to know that there is, at least, one person who cares. Be the ‘shepherd’ to a ‘sheep’ who, because of current circumstances, may be feeling separated from the flock. And, remember to check that they are not ‘in need’ of anything through their enforced isolation and be prepared to act should there be such a problem. Jesus does not abandon us in our need and neither should we abandon others of his flock in theirs. Green pastures. Still waters. Nothing beats kindness – and that’s what good shepherds are all about. Aren’t they?

Prayers
Please remember in your prayers:
front-line staff within the NHS and all who support their work;
the residents and staff of our Care Homes and Hospices;
the volunteers making scrubs and other PPE equipment;
those who are working to develop a vaccine against coronavirus and various other devices to help life return to its next level of normal;
the people who bring food and essential supplies to our stores or doors;
key workers in all areas that support our lives;
any who are suffering from illness or struggling with the restrictions of daily life, especially any known to us;
our Government, national and local, and their advisors;
the armed forces who serve in the hot-spots of the world and those redeployed to various tasks within the nation.

We also remember in your prayers John Gostling, former Churchwarden at Apuldram, who died in the early hours of Tuesday 28th April. Please pray for his wife Mary at this very difficult time. John had spent the last six weeks of his life in a Nursing Home. Very sadly, Mary was not allowed to visit him. Thanks are given to the Nursing Home who arranged for her to have an hour long phone call with him the night before he died. May he rest in peace.

On Thursday, the Bishop of Chichester announced the following:
The Revd Ruth Bushyager, currently Vicar of St Paul’s, Dorking in the Diocese of Guildford will serve as Bishop of Horsham.
The Revd William Hazlewood, currently Vicar of the United Benefice of Dartmouth and Dittisham in the Diocese of Exeter will be the next Bishop of Lewes.
Please pray for Bishops Ruth and William and their families as they make plans to leave their current parishes, move and take up life in their new settings.

A Prayer for VE Day on Friday 8th May (from the Act of Commitment for Peace)
[PS You might like to display banners/flags in your windows for this 75th anniversary.]

Lord God our Father,
we pledge ourselves to serve you and all humankind, in the cause of peace,
for the relief of want and suffering,
and for the praise of your name.
Guide us by your Spirit;
give us wisdom;
give us courage;
give us hope;
and keep us faithful, now and always. Amen.
We pray in the words that Jesus taught his first disciples:
Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Merciful Father,
you gave your Son Jesus Christ to be the good shepherd,
and in his love for us to lay down his life and rise again:
keep us always under his protection,
and give us grace to follow in his steps;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

If there is righteousness in the heart, there will be beauty in the character.
If there is beauty in the character, there will be harmony in the home.
If there is harmony in the home, there will be order in the nation.
If there is order in the nation, there will be peace in the world.
So, let it be. Amen.

Alleluia! Christ is Risen. He is Risen indeed, alleluia!

The God of peace, who brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus,
that great shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the eternal covenant,
make you perfect in every good work to do his will,
working in you that which is well-pleasing in his sight;
and the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit,
be with you and your loved ones, this day and for evermore. Amen.

 

The Third Sunday of Easter. (From Moira – 26th April 2020)

Alleluia! Christ is Risen, He is risen indeed, Alleluia.

Let us sit in silence for a moment as we acknowledge that although we are physically apart, we do come together each week to worship God.

Every Sunday, this short service goes out to about 90 households, which means at least 140 plus people are reading it, so although we are apart, our hearts are together in Spirit.

Lord Jesus, you raise us to new life,
Lord, have mercy.

Lord Jesus, you forgive us our sins,
Christ have mercy.

Lord Jesus, you feed us with your grace and love.
Lord have mercy.

May the God of Love and power forgive us and free us from our sins, heal and strengthen us by His Spirit, and raise us daily to new life in Christ Jesus. Amen.

Sing: He’s got the whole world in His hands. (I can’t hear you)

Readings: Acts 2, 14a then 36-41, Luke 24. v 13-35.

Reflection.
They were so downcast, everything it seemed, had gone wrong. So why, did Jesus simply not say, “hello, it’s me”, why did he let them keep walking for seven miles, why didn’t he just put them out of their misery and answer their questions. Rarely do any of the gospels give us a straight answer to what we should believe or what we should do. And today’s is no different, we are not given any answers, rather the whole story raises several questions, and invites us to reflect.

The road to Damascus is such a well known story and many different sermons have been preached about it. Today, I invite you to think about it in a slightly different way. To see it as your story.

Instead of Jerusalem and Emmaus being actual places, let us see them as representing human life and moments of real experience. Jerusalem is the place of heartbreak, loss, pain, hopelessness the times when everything has gone wrong.
Emmaus, represents the place of healing, of restoration, the place where new life and hope is discovered. The seven miles inbetween them is not simply about how far they had to walk, but that the journey had to be complete. The number 7 represents this.

Overall, this reading is an amazing story of shattering and restoration. The road to Emmaus is in fact our story.
If your life has ever been shattered, then this is your story. If your life has ever been restored, then this is your story. And if you’ve been in that in between place, then this is your story also.

It is not however about a one time journey, we take it time and time again throughout our lives.

We all know those moments in life when we feel such pain, loss and brokedness, those times when things didn’t quite work out in the way we wanted them to, it is at those times that we too can feel just like those disciples on that first Easter Day.

All their expectations had been shattered, they felt completely lost, sure they had heard some rumours that Jesus was alive, but it all sounded like an idle tale. So there was nothing to keep them in Jerusalem, they desperately needed to get away from the pain while they tried to make sense of what had happened.

Why they chose to go to Emmaus is unclear, but I guess it was a case of anywhere would be better than staying where they were.

And so Emmaus becomes the escape from life, or so those first disciples thought and we, may think, What we don’t know, and what Cleopas didn’t know at the time, is that actually the place of Emmaus is also the way back to life. Ultimately, it wasn’t an escape from life that took them along the road, but a hunger for life. It wasn’t brokenness that took them there, but a hunger for wholeness.

Hunger is far more that just physical, it is also spiritual and emotional. We all hunger for life, for love and for wholeness, we hunger for community, meaning and purpose. Today’s reading reminds us that all those hungers are met and filled by the person of Jesus. We are reassured that it is ok to feel lost and hopeless, we are reminded that the journey we need to take will be as long as it needs to be, and we are given the certainty that we will be restored to wholeness.

And this is where we need each other, we are called to be the one who walks alongside those who are hurting, avoiding the temptation to give easy answers or to hurry the person along. But to walk with them for as long as it takes. And we must never forget, that we are also called to be the one who allows others to walk with us in our time of need, we don’t ever have to do it alone.

The great truth is, our brokenness is not an ending. There is always more to it than we see or know. It can in fact be the breaking open of a new way of life, a new way of seeing the world around us, a fresh understanding of who we are and who God is. The sufferings and difficulties that we experience are not just wiped away as if they never happened, but they are given value by each step we take on our road through life, and we are changed by each and every one of them.

Perhaps this is so very true for all of us at this time. ‘Normal’ life has been shattered, it is scary, and it can be so very hard, difficult and painful. But perhaps amid this pandemic, a new way of living is breaking through. We are all learning what is really important, what we truly need, and daily we are given a renewed way of looking at the world around us.
We see the beauty in small things, we find joy in simply being, rather than doing. Every single one of us will be changed by the experiences that we are going through. And although it may seem that we can’t ‘be’ there for others, actually we can, just in a different way. Picking up on David’s reflection from last week, we are still the church, we can still be there for each other, we just need to continue discovering new and exciting ways to do this. Let us all see the signs of Hope and new life all around us as we take this journey from this ‘Jerusalem’, to the place of ‘Damascus’ which undoubtably lies ahead of us. Amen

Prayers:

This week, let us pray for our local school, and the staff who continue to care for children of key workers.
For the residents in Manor Barn, Cornelius House and all care homes, and for all who care for them.
For the sad, the lonely and those who feel afraid.
Let us give thanks for all those who are giving their time to help neighbours in need. And for all those who have survived this terrible pandemic.
Finally, let us rejoice in the knowledge that Jesus walks with us every step of the way.

Lord’s Prayer.
Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever, Amen.

Notices. (Just in case you were missing them).
Good new, both Beau and Luke will be starting Fishbourne school in September. Where does the time go.
If you are having to isolate, don’t hesitate to ask for help from the Fishbourne Volunteer Squad, details on the website.
Finally, the answers to the mid-week questions.
The photo of the deer was taken in the back garden of Gordon and Gillian’s house.
And Mark was planting a tree. Not just any tree though, a special one in memory of those who have died.
Well done to John and Gay who were very quick with the right answers.

Let us pray:
Living God, Your Son made himself known to His disciples in the breaking of the bread, open the eyes of our faith, that we may see him in all His redeeming work: for He is alive and reigns, now and forever. Amen.

Blessing.
God, who through the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ has given us the victory, give us joy and peace in our faith each and every day. And the Blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit be upon us and all whom we love. Amen.

So be at peace, let love fill your hearts, and be kind to yourselves.
I miss you all, Moira.

 

Alleluia! Christ is Risen. He is Risen indeed, alleluia! (From Rev’d David Hider – 19th April)

Like Mary at the empty tomb,
we fail to grasp the wonder of your presence.
Lord, have mercy.

Like the disciples behind locked doors,
we are afraid to be seen as your followers.
Christ, have mercy.

Like Thomas in the upper room,
we are slow to believe.
Lord, have mercy.

May the God of love and power
forgive us and free us from our sins,
heal and strengthen us by his Spirit,
and raise us to new life in Christ our Lord. Amen.

Glory to God in the highest, and peace to his people on earth.
Lord God, heavenly King, almighty God and Father,
we worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father, Lord God, Lamb of God,
you take away the sin of the world: have mercy on us;
you are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord,
you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

Today’s Collect (Special Prayer)
Almighty Father,
you have given your only Son to die for our sins
and to rise again for our justification:
grant us so to put away the leaven of malice and wickedness
that we may always serve you
in pureness of living and truth;
through the merits of your Son Jesus Christ our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Readings: Acts 4:14a,22-32; John 20:19-31

Today’s Message
The disciples were in lockdown for ‘fear of the Jews’. We are in lockdown for ‘fear of catching/spreading the virus’. To the disciples, Jesus came ‘and stood among them and said: “Peace be with you.”’. Likewise to us, Jesus comes, stands alongside us and says: “Peace be with you.” The setting of about two thousand years ago and ours today are very similar. So, what else does Jesus go on to say and is it relevant today?

Our Bible story tells us that the disciples are meeting together – perhaps, in the Upper Room where they had held the Last Supper – after the remarkable events of that Easter morning. We are told that they are scared. Scared that they might be the next to lose their lives now that the religious authorities have taken Jesus’ life? Scared that they might be hunted down and killed? So, the doors are locked.

But, locked doors hold no problems for the risen Christ. Suddenly, he is there among them! He shows them his hands with the tell-tale marks of his crucifixion. He greets them in his normal calm fashion: ‘Peace be with you!’ They have scarcely taken in his appearance when they are given the first of a number of remarkable commands. There is no time for niceties – it is time to be moving. Jesus says to them: ‘As the Father has sent me, so I send you.’ They are to be sent out to do God’s work. Jesus has completed his task – he has made it possible for his disciples to continue with his Father’s work. And, he will be with them always. Through him, they receive the power to do God’s work. Here are the first priests being sent forth – out into the world to continue the work that Jesus started. Here, too, are the first Christians being sent forth out into the world to carry the good news of love, hope and peace.

It all sounds so simple. And, yet, with all this time for reflection as at the present, I wonder whether there is something essentially wrong with ‘the Church’ today and, without criticism, I even wonder whether there might also something wrong with ‘our’ church. So much of our leadership focus and so many of our programmes are concerned with trying to bring people into church to worship. A good example of this is the current fuss about churches not being open for Services during this time of pandemic. All would do well to note that Jesus’ words to his disciples are about going out to take the message of God into the world – not of bringing people in to worship. ‘As the Father has sent me, so I send you,’ says Jesus.

So, as I see it, the challenge is to see how – and whether we are willing – to change ‘our’ church to ‘look outward’ and not ‘inward’. How? When? These are the real questions. What we do know is that if we do nothing – that is, in effect, maintain the status quo – the Church, as we know it, will probably ‘die’, become extinct. Not this year – but, more likely, it will happen within the lifetime of our grandchildren. Thinking on, perhaps the pandemic has a positive side (and, golly, doesn’t it need one!). Church worship has not stopped since the Churches closed their doors! It has continued, albeit in a different format and setting. And, if numbers are to be believed, Churches up and down the country are reporting larger numbers of people ‘connecting’ with their ‘new’ worship offerings than would normally attend their regular Services. Surely, in the words of the Archbishop of Canterbury (as Moira quoted last week), this says that ‘we cannot be content to go back to what was before.’ Indeed, the effects of dealing with the pandemic have affected – and will continue to affect – so many aspects of our lives that it is inconceivable we could ever return to doing exactly what was done pre-coronavirus – with the result things will have to change come what may. Strategies for social distancing; physical touching; sharing the common cup (chalice); use of Service/hymn books; use of face masks (?); and so on, will need to be addressed, at the very minimum, before we can worship together again in Church. Messy Church, PCC and other Church Committee meetings, Jumble Sales and other fund-raising events, Book Fayres, Social gatherings (including refreshments after Services) will need re-thinking before they can resume. This is not evolution but ‘revolution’, so please pray for Moira and the Churchwardens who will have to take the prime role in leading us through it.

This also places an enormous responsibility on each one of us. I think that there is a unique opportunity to use the enforced lockdown period to stand back to reflect.

Firstly, given the call of Jesus to look outward and not inward with the Gospel message, can we identify any selfish needs that we, personally, might have of the way the Church works and how it does things? Can we, then, put that selfishness aside to help us reach out to enable others to become part of the Jesus story?

Secondly, thankfully, there has been good in the public reaction to the coronavirus lockdown in that neighbourliness has become much more pronounced. ‘Love your neighbour …’ is the stuff of the Gospel. This is the part of the ‘go and tell’ which does not actually require words. Showing a loving act or a helpful hand is part of the DNA of the Christian. The trick will become as to how as both a Church and as individual Christians, post-lockdown, we might continue / even enhance such acts as a way of reaching out to take the love of Jesus into the community.

When viewed like this, the call of Jesus is relatively simple! And, I think that is what he always intended it to be! Jesus still tells his disciples of all ages: ‘As the Father has sent me, so I send you.’ This is echoed by the priest at the end of each Communion Service: ‘Go in peace to love and serve the Lord’ – to which the communal reply is: ‘In the name of Christ. Amen.’

Alleluia! Christ is Risen. He is Risen indeed, alleluia!

Prayers
Please remember in your prayers:
front-line staff within the NHS, their families and all who support their work;
any who are suffering from illness or struggling with the restrictions of daily life;
the residents and staff of our Care Homes;
the people who bring food and essential supplies to our stores or doors;
other key workers in all areas that support our lives;
our Government, national and local;
the armed forces redeployed to various tasks within the nation;
those whose plans for marriage, baptism and funerals have had to be deferred.

Our Father in heaven. Hallowed be your name. Your Kingdom come.
Your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins, as we forgive those who sin against us.
Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.
For the Kingdom, the power and the glory are yours; now and forever. Amen.

Lord God our Father,
through our Saviour Jesus Christ
you have assured your children of eternal life
and in baptism have made us one with him:
deliver us from the death of sin
and raise us to new life in your love,
in the fellowship of the Holy Spirit,
by the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.

Alleluia! Christ is Risen. He is Risen indeed, alleluia!

Risen Christ,
for whom no door is locked, no entrance barred:
open the doors of our hearts,
that we may seek the good of others
and walk the joyful road of sacrifice and peace,
to the praise of God the Father.
And the blessing of God Almighty,
the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit
be with you and those whom you love, this day and for evermore. Amen.

 

ALLELUIA, CHRIST IS RISEN.
HE IS RISEN INDEED, ALLELUIA. (From Moira – 12th April)

Happy Easter everyone.
Just under 2000 years ago, all the powers of Hell could not stop the Resurrection of Christ. And nothing, not even the corona virus will prevent it today.

And so may the light of Christ, rising in glory, banish all darkness from our hearts and minds.

I invite you to light a candle, and as you do so, say, ‘the Light of Christ, has come into the world’, knowing that this light burns brightly in each one of your hearts.

Let us pray.

Lord of all life and power, who through the mighty resurrection of your Son, overcame the old order of sin and death to make all things new in Him: grant that we, being dead to sin and alive to you in Jesus Christ, may reign with him in glory, to whom with you and the Holy Spirit be praise and honour, glory and might, now and in all eternity. Amen.

Let us on this most extra-ordinary Easter Day, with our brothers and sisters across the world, affirm our faith.

Do you believe and trust in God the Father, source of all being and life, the one for whom we exist?.
All: We believe and trust in Him.

Do you believe and trust God the Son,who took our human nature, died for us and rose again?.
All: We believe and trust in Him.

Do you believe and trust in the Holy Spirit who gives life to the people of God, and makes Christ known in the world?
All: We believe and trust in Him.

This is our Faith, we believe and trust in one God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

Readings for today. Acts 10. v 34-43 and Matt. 28 v.1-10.

Reflection.
Some words from Justin Welby. ‘After so much suffering, so much heroism from key workers and the NHS, we cannot be content to go back to what was before, as if all is normal’.
Although those words were spoken for this present time, they hold a truth about every Easter, we cannot, having experienced the Resurrection of Christ, ever go back to the way we were. There is no doubt that this year everything feels very different, some of you I know have struggled, others are deeply worried about what the future will be like, all of us will have been deeply affected by so many deaths in recent weeks. It is as if we are living through a horror film. But the promises and mystery of Easter stand just as firm and strong as they always have, the darkness will be overcome, this time will pass, we will see one another again, oh and how we shall sing, laugh and cry together.
In Mark’s account of the Resurrection there are two words which often get overlooked. The message given to the women who had gone to the tomb was as we know, ‘go and tell the disciples’, but Mark then adds, ‘and Peter’. Peter who had recently denied Christ three times and was probably not feeling so good about himself, was now to get a special message, a message of profound healing. This healing is offered to all of us as well. May it also bring healing to the whole world at this time, for the world desperately needs it.
Today we have the most amazing truth to share with others, Jesus is indeed alive, we are changed, filled with renewed Hope, Joy, Peace and Love. So let us rejoice, not in the way we have done so in previous years, but in this special and unique way that we are offered this year. And may many more in the world catch a glimpse of God’s glory this Easter time, so that their lives too will be changed forever. Amen

Prayers.
Today, let us pray for those who feel alone and bereft at having to stay away from loved ones.
Let us pray for those in our nursing homes and all care workers.
We continue to pray for all in hospital and for the doctors and nurses who give so much of themselves.
Let us also pray for Thomas, who would have been baptised this morning.
And let us Thank God for one another, we may be physically apart, but our hearts are united as one.

God of Life, who for our redemption gave your only begotten Son to the death of the cross, and by His glorious resurrection have delivered us from the power of our enemy: grant us so to die daily to sin, that we may evermore live with him in the joy of His risen life, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The peace and joy of the risen Lord be with each one of you.

Before we ask for God’s Blessing, let us either sing, or listen to:
Thine be the Glory. You will be able to find this on Google or if you have Spotify. if you don’t have this access, just sing it as best you can.

The God of peace, who brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, that great shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the eternal covenant, make you perfect in every good work to do His will, working in you that which is well-pleasing in His sight; and the blessing of God Almighty, Father, Son and Holy Spirit be with each one of us this day and in the days to come. Amen.

And so go and be in peace, with God and with yourself.
Shine as a light in the world, to the Glory of God the Father.

One more thing, just to remind you, may bring my Easter eggs to church when next we meet, I am really going to miss my chocolate this week-end.

This afternoon, at 3.00 p.m, do pour yourself a glass of wine or beer, go into your garden, or to the front of your house, invite the neighbours and together let us raise a glass as we celebrate this unique Easter Day.

Love and prayers to you all. Moira

 

GOOD FRIDAY. A CELEBRATION OF THE CROSS. (From Moira – 10th April)

Dear friends, today we are reminded just how much God loves us, and the whole world. As you read through this, please, if you are able to, place a small cross in front of you. This could be a palm cross, a wooden one or one that you create yourself.. I invite you to join with me in the prayers, hymns and readings that follow, and then at 3.00 p.m, the time that Jesus died, to pause for a moment so as to hear those awesome words from God, ‘I love you this much’.

Prayer.
God of eternal love, we approach you with a sense of deep wonder. Your love reaches out to us in the face of rejection, pain and loneliness. You continue to suffer in the conflicts and failures which are our lives. And yet, still you love us. Open our hearts and minds to contemplate your passion, assure us again of forgiveness and acceptance, and so fill us with your love that we may recognise and answer the call to share your passion in the world. This we ask, through him in whom your amazing love is revealed. Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

Please do take time now to read The Passion of our Lord Jesus Christ, according to John. John chapter 18-chapter 19 v30.

After you have read this, do sing the following, (you can sing quietly), to the tune of Abide with me.

Christ, Son of God, we recognise your claim,
No one but you dare speak the holy name,
This great I AM will bear love’s awesome cost,
Not one of those who love you shall be lost.

Christ, by your friends in daily life denied,
Bruised by the fall which follows sinful pride,
You, only you, can pardon and restore,
Reach out your wounded hand to us once more.

Truly ‘bar Abbas’, Christ the Father’s Son,
Sinless, you die for every guilty one,
Call us to witness truth, and hear your voice
Justice and righteousness, shall be our choice,

Christ, Priest and Victim, this is now your hour,
Victim of priests, and princes lust for power,
Help us destroy the god’s of pow’r and pride,
And stand with you among the crucified.

Christ, Son of Mary,, Brother of us all,
Give us the grace to answer to your call.
Grant us to live by faith, that when we die,
Your ‘It is finished’, is our final cry.

Reflection . And then he kissed him.
There is no greater betrayal than the one that is done by a friend. None of us will ever be nailed to a cross like Jesus, but perhaps we can relate to the hurt that Jesus must have felt after being betrayed by Judas, when he had kissed him so that the soldiers knew who to arrest.
It hurts when a friend lets us down, it can be agony and we may want to hurt back, to justify ourselves. But Jesus did not react to what Judas did, he silently gave himself over to the authorities, and now hung on the cross. He willingly made himself vulnerable, knowing that humanity would make a choice, accept his love, or reject him. We know which choice was made.
And so he came to his death almost alone, his friends had run away in fear, the crowds had dispersed as the’ fun’ was now over. But not everyone had left. As Jesus gazed down, he saw his Mother and the disciple he loved so much. From the depths of agony he continued to create and to give. With just a few words he gave his mother and the disciple to one another as a wonderful gift. And he continues to give each one of us to others as precious gifts as well.
As we reflect on those who stayed by the cross, stayed with the agony and pain that was right in front of them, we are reminded of all those who this day stay close to those who are in agony, and to those who will die. Our doctors and nurses have witnessed so much death during these last few weeks, they must be afraid, they may at times want to run away, but they do not, they stay, and make bearable that which is unbearable. In their lives, they reveal by all they do, the love, strength and compassion that surely comes from God.
The cross, at one and the same time a sign of horrific suffering and a symbol of hope and love. As we gaze at our own cross, let us be assured that it is the way to freedom, to life, and may we re-discover the love and glory of God. As we acknowledge that the man who died on that cross did so for each one of us, let us say, ‘sorry’, but let us hear once more those beautiful words’, ‘I love you this much’.

Prayers.

Father of the crucified, hear our prayer for all who are fearful, and who are moved by that fear to strike out at others, that they may learn the joy of letting go and accept your gift of love.

Father of the crucified, we pray for all who are fearful due to the corona virus, we pray for all those who are suffering from this terrible illness and for their families and friends. Be with those who feel alone or abandoned, and with those who are separated from their grand children and loved ones.

Father of the crucified, bless all those who work for the NHS, especially those who have given their life for others, we pray for all care workers, post men and women, dustbin men and all those who continue to work, so as to serve the needs of others. Help us all to be mindful of those who do not have a safe place to stay in, and of those who do not have enough to eat.

Father of the crucified, on this Good Friday, we remember all those who will die this day, help us all to let go of fear, give us grace and courage to face what ever the next few weeks or months might bring.

Thanks be to thee, O Lord Jesus Christ, for all the benefits, which thou hast given us. For all the pains and insults which thou hast borne for us:
O merciful Redeemer, Friend and Brother, may we know you more clearly, love thee more dearly, and follow thee more nearly. Amen.

‘There is no greater love than to lay down one’s life for others’.

Now we all wait, just for a little while, for that day when we will re-discover that the events of this day were not the end of the story.

 

MAUNDY THURSDAY – from Moira (Posted 9th April)

Dear Friends, as we begin this most unusual three days before Easter, here is the first part of the unfolding drama that took place all those years ago, and continues to take place to this very day.
As is the normal practise, there will be no Blessing at the end of this nor on Good Friday, our Blessing will come on Easter Day.

The Lord be with you all.

Remember Lord, your compassion and love, for they are everlasting.
Lord have mercy.
Remember not the sins of my youth, but think on me in your goodness,
Lord have mercy.
O keep my soul and deliver me, for I have put my trust in you.
Lord have mercy.

May almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins and bring us to everlasting life. Amen.

The Collect Prayer.
God our Father, you have invited us to share in the supper which your Son gave to his church to proclaim his death until he comes, may he nourish us with his presence, and unite us in his love, who is alive and reigns with you, in the unity of the holy spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Bible Readings: 1 Cor.11. v.23-26 and John 13, 1-17.

A Reflection.
On the night before he died, Jesus invited his friends to a life changing party. As they ate and drank, he took some bread, broke it and shared it among them, saying, do this to remember me. In that action he gave to his church that great gift of Holy Communion. This year, although we cannot physically come together to celebrate this in church, we can perhaps remember Jesus in a different, special, way. Today, as you sit down for a meal, either by yourself or with your family, take some bread, break it, and as you do, remember that Christ is with you, at your very own table. As we do this our hearts will be united in Christ’s love.
A love that he revealed in the most unusual meal. When the disciples arrived for this meal, their feet were very dirty and covered in dust from the road. Normally a servant would have washed the feet, but not on this night. It was Jesus himself who took a bowl of water and a towel, knelt down and washed the dirt away. In this one action, it was as if God himself had knelt, looked those disciples in the eye, and said, ‘this is how much I love you’, as he met their basic need.
We are reminded that Jesus continues to kneel down, to look us in the eyes with such compassion and love. He continues to meet us at our point of need. So many people are feeling anxious and afraid at this time, there is loneliness, sadness and great loss all around, none of us have ever experienced anything quite like what the world is now facing. Let us be assured, that whatever we feel, Jesus cares very much, he is with us, and he will gentle wipe away our fears, in the same way as he wiped the dirt from the feet of his first disciples. I promise you, He will fill our hearts with his peace, as we acknowledge his presence with us.

Today, let us pray for all those who ‘kneel’ down to care for others.
Let us pray for those who are unwell.
Let us pray that this terrible virus will be stopped.
And let us pray for one another, remembering especially those who live on their own.

Our Father, who art in Heaven, hallowed be thy name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil, for thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.

They came to a place called Gethsemane, and Jesus said, ‘stay here, while I pray’. Then he took Peter, James and John with him. A sudden fear came over him, he threw himself on the ground and prayed, ‘Abba Father, everything is possible for you, take this cup from me, but let it be your will that is done’.
When he came back, he found the disciples sleeping, he woke them and said, ‘could you not stay awake for just one hour’.
Again he went away and prayed the same words to his Father.
When he returned he again found them asleep, he said, ‘You can sleep on now, and take your rest, It is all over, The hour has come.

THE WAY OF THE CROSS – from Moira (Monday 6th April)

Dear friends, as we begin this most unusual Holy Week, I thought I would share with you some reflections and prayers based on the journey Jesus himself took to the Cross. Some of you will be familiar with this, for others it may be very new, please do use it as you wish.

Prayer.
Lord God, the Cross reveals the mystery of your Love, a stumbling block indeed for unbelief,
But the sign of your power and wisdom to those who do believe.
Teach us to contemplate your Son’s glorious passion that we may always believe and glory in His Cross, and in whose name we pray, Amen.

JESUS IS CONDEMNED TO DEATH.

Pilate came outside and said, Look, I am going to bring him out to you, to let you see that I find no case. When the people saw him they shouted, ‘CRUCIFY HIM, CRUCIFY HIM. Pilate again said, ‘I find no case against Him’, but they replied, ‘We have a Law, according to which he ought to be put to death, because he claimed to to be the Son of God.

Reflection: Jesus is condemned to death, but who by, was it Pilate, the man who could find no case against him.
Was it by the crowd, whipped up by mass emotion, egged on by those whose loathing of Jesus had turned to determined hatred.
Or was it by us, by the rash judgments we make, by our failure to insist on justice or by our indifference in the face of injustice.

Lord Jesus, give us the strength to stand firm for what is right, and the courage to suffer injustice with dignity and compassion. For you are Lord, for ever and ever. Amen.

JESUS TAKES UP HIS CROSS.

Jesus said, ‘if anyone wants to be a follower of mine, let him renounce himself, take up his cross, and follow me’,

No one passes through this life without any burden. Some burdens are given to us, some we carry on behalf of of others, but the burden of the cross is surely a weight too heavy for anyone to bear. But that weight, was taken up by Jesus.

Lord, have mercy on us for adding to your burden.

JESUS FALLS.

Jesus would fall three times on this journey, each fall worse than the last. The cross is a contradiction, the weight of which bore down on Jesus’ bruised shoulders. There are many contradictions that accompany us through life. We are called to holiness, but often driven by our weakness, This Holy week, may we not despair of our strength to bear the stresses of life, because it is not our strength that will prevail, but the strength of Jesus.

Lord Jesus, as we fall as sure we ill, have mercy on us. When we fall as we surely will, give us strength and new hope.
When we fall, as we surely will, forgive us and make us yours. Amen.

JESUS MEETS HIS MOTHER.

At Cana, Jesus had said to his mother, ‘Woman, why turn to me?, my hour has not yet come’. Now His hour had come and His mother is there for him, and with him. Mary did not always understand, but her trust in God, and her maternal love reached beyond any lack of understanding and way beyond the sorrow in her own heart.

Lord Jesus, when our minds do not understand, give us a trusting heart, that we may come to understand even as we will be understood, For you are Lord, for ever and ever. Amen.

SIMON HELPS CARRY THE CROSS.

As they were leading him a way, they seized on a man, Simon from Cyrene, and made him shoulder the cross and carry it behind Jesus.

Simon did not volunteer to help carry the cross, would we have done?. Yet, having helped in this unique and holy way, his life and the lives of many others were changed. So that this imposed duty came to be seen as a wonderful and joyful privilege. None of us can take the place of Jesus, Simon did not take the cross from him, but he did help. None of us can take anyone else’s burdens from them, but we can help, and in helping we too are changed.

Lord Jesus, in this time of great uncertainty, when we witness so many stepping forward to help others, we ask you to Bless every single one of them so that their and our lives may be changed forever. Amen.

VERONICA WIPES THE FACE OF JESUS.

She stepped out from the crowd, knelt down in the dirt, and gently wiped the face of Jesus, this one small act of kindness reminds us all that there is great value in the smallest act of real kindness. As we think about Veronica, let us pause to acknowledge all in the NHS who this day give of themselves to wipe the faces of those in desperate need.

Perhaps you would like to say the Lord’s prayer here.

JESUS IS STRIPPED OF HIS GARMENTS.

These people stare at me and gloat, they divide my clothing among them, they cast lots for my robe.

As we imagine this scene, we cannot escape the contrast of the Armour of the soldiers and the nakedness of Jesus, But here we see the vulnerability and exposure, which is the cost of loving to the point of no return. In this self-divestment, Jesus is showing us the deepest nature of God.

Lord Jesus, you alone are our protection and comfort, may we wear the clothing of our Christian Faith with dignity and courage. For you are Lord, for ever and ever. Amen.

JESUS IS NAILED TO THE CROSS.

The hammer, a tool of the carpenter’s workshop, is now used to inflict the cruellest of blows, to bind the body of Christ to the hard wooden cross. The hammer hits hard, but the hammer does not strike on its own, it is wielded by another human hand. Our hands can do so much good, or so much harm, the choice is ours.

JESUS DIES.

Death is without doubt a dark moment, none so dark as this one. The Son of God dies, the human breath of God expires. The brutal finality of death casts a long and sorrowful shadow.
It is here that we see that the love of God takes hold of any known or imagined limits, and goes beyond them, through any suffering. Death is a silent moment, none so silent as this one where we hear the ‘silence of eternity, interpreted by love’.

Lord Jesus, As we reflect on your death, we pray for all those across the world who have died because of corona virus. Be with their families and friends, by your grace, may they know your love, and your lasting peace. Amen

THE RESURRECTION OF THE LORD.

The cross, a symbol of despair and failure, or a symbol of triumph and victory. Perhaps when we look at a cross we see both.
Ultimately, the glory of the Resurrection gives us hope, and reveals to us the mystery and triumph of the Cross.

Lord Jesus, the power of your Resurrection, which has won for us the victory over sin and death, makes the Cross a symbol of glory. May we always rejoice in that Glory, may we always hold fast to hope, and may we all be strengthened at this time of darkness and fear across the world. Amen.

“There is no greater Love, says the Lord, than to lay down your life for a friends”.